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Does Windows Vista Reduce Overclocking?

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July 22, 2008 8:03:29 PM

Out of Curiosity, Does Windows Vista Reduce how much you can overclock your CPU? Sometimes I receive the Blue Screen System halt, and sometimes when I'm doing intensive CPU stuff it doesn't.

Would I benefit from going back to XP or back to 32 bit??

Right now I have Windows Vista 64 Ultimate.

My specs are in my Signature.

It happens very rarely, but it happens when I'm surfing the net, but not when I'm playing COD4 or Half life 2 or Extracting for that matter....
July 22, 2008 8:18:52 PM

I got the impression it does. The overclock from the bios is the same but what is stable is a different story. Would like to see some tests on this but never have
July 22, 2008 8:23:23 PM

What is the error message in the blue screen?
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a b K Overclocking
July 22, 2008 8:26:58 PM

I suspect it's not related to the overclock, especially since it's not happening under load.

It's just that Vista has been around for fewer years than XP and has had fewer users, so the bugs haven't yet all been flushed out.

If it's mostly during surfing, try changing browsers, or getting rid of some plugins, or surfing to different sites. For example I love FireFox, but with some plugins/extensions it becomes prone to crashes. It's not Firefox's fault, it's just that some extension writers are less good than others.

You might also need newer drivers for something, especially video cards.
Read this:
http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20080325-vista-capable-lawsuit-paints-picture-of-buggy-nvidia-drivers.html

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July 22, 2008 8:29:54 PM

Try lossining the memory timings and also whats your memory voltage? Is there anything specific that the BSoD states such as a driver or anything?

I don't think it will make any difference XP or Vista.

I have yet to have Vista BSoD on me except when my memory voltage was too low or when my GPU driver decides to be crappy.
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July 22, 2008 8:40:16 PM

njalterio said:
What is the error message in the blue screen?


Specifically, is there a mention of nv4_disp.dll, by any chance? I used to get that one a lot when my 8800GTX was new, and it went away after a few driver upgrades.

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a c 324 K Overclocking
July 22, 2008 8:52:41 PM

If you OC in the BIOS, the system should run as that unless it becomes unstable and crashes due to FSB, RAM or voltage issues which would otherwise be present in XP, for example. There is a good chance that because Vista stresses components more than XP, you are seeing some limitation as to how they perform under load with those settings. I would think that loading up XP and running Prime95 or other stress benchmark would also lead to the same conclusion as when you are running Vista.

Overclocking is totally dependent on the stability of your components at specific settings and load, regardless of the OS. If the components aren't stable, the OS will likely not handle threads or memory processes correctly and crash.

I'm not saying I'm an expert, but in my experience, this is what seems to be the case. Software is only as stable as the hardware running it...unless there is software corruption. (Assuming a format/clean install)
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July 22, 2008 8:53:09 PM

^I used to get that on olde nVidia hardware on both Win 2K and XP. Used to bug the beJebus out of me.
July 22, 2008 9:02:03 PM

I assume you overclock through the bios. Probably your overclock isn't 100% stable. The 64bit OS will more thoroughly utilize and stress your cpu than the 32bit OS. So, that slight instability may only show up when you use 64bit Vista.
July 22, 2008 9:02:09 PM

Yes Vista does indeed require changes to your overclocking efforts. I had to make some voltage changes in my BIOS to get a stable system under Vista x64. My system would be solid as a rock under WinXP 32bit, but the same overclocking setting caused problems under Vista.

Think I just ended up bumping up NBv a couple of notches, and my DRAMv up a couple of notches. Now both are rock solid stable (can run Prime95 for days and/or 3DMark06/Vantage).

Overclocking is VERY dependant on the OS, espeically when going from 32bit to 64bit. 64bit instructions and data excution puts considerably more stress on a system than 32bit.
July 22, 2008 11:19:48 PM

V8VENOM said:
Overclocking is VERY dependant on the OS, espeically when going from 32bit to 64bit. 64bit instructions and data excution puts considerably more stress on a system than 32bit.


Please ignore this as it is pure nonsense. Overclockig is NOT dependant on the OS. Overclocking refers to running components at a level above the specs. These settings are (in the vast majority of cases, and generally if you do things the right way) are set in BIOS - and stored in the CMOS (legacy term for the non-volatile BIOS memory).

As you can see, the above is entirely independent of the OS - in fact, it is only dependent on the capabilities of the particular board and BIOS.

What happens when you switch systems, is that now you are using processor instructions and potentially memory addresses that went previously unused. So, switching to a different system could indeed reveal the instability that was always there to begin with, just was never exposed. In your case, it could be related to two things - use of the 64bit logic of the processor, or heavier use of the memory due to Vista's aggressive memory-managing practices (which are actually a good thing, contrary to what a lot of idiots would have you believe. If you have memory, you might as well use it).

Which it is - well, you have to test. But rest assured; all your system switch did was simply expose instabilities that were already there.
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July 23, 2008 12:06:32 AM

excellent reply russki
July 23, 2008 1:15:46 AM

Sorry just got back from work.

Memory timings are default, and the memory is synced with the CPU now.

The BSOD Message is something like " SYSTEM HAS HALTED" "CONTACT YOUR MANUFACTURER"

Voltage: Every AUTO

Except:

Memory 2.2 (default 1.8)
SB 1.6

I tried North Bridge 1.6 but it starts to get buggy in Bios after I do that.

My temps are 32 CPU, SB 47, NB 57, GPU: 57 GPU 2: 59

July 23, 2008 4:32:00 AM

hmm I wonder what I need to change....
July 23, 2008 5:07:22 AM

hmm...i think i read somewhere that BSOD can be related to ram? im not totally sure so don''t quote me on this, but recently i was helping a friend with BSOD problems and OC-ing, we took out 2 stick of his ram (he has 4), and now his computer is stable as ever. just a suggestion. other than that, if your voltages are at auto, and if your memory is rated to run at 2.2, i honestly can't think of anything that would BSOD ur comp. good luck with it!
July 23, 2008 5:46:29 AM

russki said:
These settings are (in the vast majority of cases, and generally if you do things the right way) are set in BIOS - and stored in the CMOS (legacy term for the non-volatile BIOS memory).
The changes are stored in memory that is volatile, that's why you need the battery to hold up the changes. The default BIOS is on an EEPROM which is nonvolitile.
July 23, 2008 6:22:18 AM

I don't think Vista reduces overclocking as much as being sensitive to unstable hardware. When my RAM chip started breaking down Vista became unstable long before XP did. Once the chip was out things where stable again.
July 23, 2008 7:09:59 AM

aevm said:
Specifically, is there a mention of nv4_disp.dll, by any chance? I used to get that one a lot when my 8800GTX was new, and it went away after a few driver upgrades.



I wish mine would go away with a few driver upgrades... sadly the newer drivers just make things worse! :( 
July 23, 2008 12:34:00 PM

L1qu1d said:
Sorry just got back from work.

Memory timings are default, and the memory is synced with the CPU now.

The BSOD Message is something like " SYSTEM HAS HALTED" "CONTACT YOUR MANUFACTURER"

Voltage: Every AUTO

Except:

Memory 2.2 (default 1.8)
SB 1.6

I tried North Bridge 1.6 but it starts to get buggy in Bios after I do that.

My temps are 32 CPU, SB 47, NB 57, GPU: 57 GPU 2: 59


You probably found your problem: your Northbridge is overheating, dude. Things are *REALLY* hot in there! Pay attention to your case/cooling, or else you might end up damaging your mobo. Anandtech states that 47C is the point between stability/instability for most chipsets. Most BSOD's are voltage or overheating related (regarding the hardware part).

(PS: Your SB is also running quite hot...)
July 23, 2008 2:07:55 PM

Zorg said:
The changes are stored in memory that is volatile, that's why you need the battery to hold up the changes. The default BIOS is on an EEPROM which is nonvolitile.

Technically you're right. I wasn't making that distinction. It is non-volatile (quasi) with respect to the system power cycles.
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July 23, 2008 2:26:30 PM

inquisitor03 said:
I wish mine would go away with a few driver upgrades... sadly the newer drivers just make things worse! :( 



For what it's worth: I'm using XP Media Center 32-bit with nVidia's WHQL-certified drivers from November 2007. If you're using Vista, I have no idea which version of those drivers is best, sorry.
July 23, 2008 3:32:37 PM

dattimr said:
You probably found your problem: your Northbridge is overheating, dude. Things are *REALLY* hot in there! Pay attention to your case/cooling, or else you might end up damaging your mobo. Anandtech states that 47C is the point between stability/instability for most chipsets. Most BSOD's are voltage or overheating related (regarding the hardware part).

(PS: Your SB is also running quite hot...)



Actually I called Asus, and they said that everything is running quite cooler than they thought. Usually Northbridges were are around 70 and South around 60. So I dunno.

Overall the MB Temperature is 32.
July 23, 2008 4:33:36 PM

L1qu1d said:
Actually I called Asus, and they said that everything is running quite cooler than they thought. Usually Northbridges were are around 70 and South around 60. So I dunno.

Overall the MB Temperature is 32.


Check this out: http://www.anandtech.com/mb/showdoc.aspx?i=3172&p=10

Quote:
North Bridge Voltage: Scale range is 1.25V-2.05v. NB temperatures greatly affect stability, and temps over 47C are prone to failures during longer Prime torture test runs. We recommend active cooling of the NB for overclocking. A combination of air- and water-cooling generates the best results when using the stock ASUS water block and heatsink combo. Voltages around 1.61V-1.65V are required for overclocking past 440FSB.


Also, if you go to ASUS' forums you will find tons of people having BSODs with "light" overclocking while having a NB temperature above 47C. There are thousands of topics regarding this at the "forbidden land" (xtremesystems' forums).

Specifically talking about the Maximus Extreme (my mobo), there were several guys having 2 or 3 BSODs per day, even when running at stock. Most problems were solved when they reduced the NB voltage a little (the ones that weren't overclocking, since the board overvolts by default), increasing the NB voltage a little (the ones that were overclocking), put a fan aimed at the NB, removed the stock cooling to change the stupid-cement-like-thing that ASUS pretends to be a thermal paste or water-cooled their boards. Just my 2 cents, anyway.
July 23, 2008 5:10:22 PM

So you think lowering the NB voltage might help?
!