Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

"favourites" list

Last response: in Windows XP
Share
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 6:35:16 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Where would one find the "favourites" datafile (and/or, what is it called?)
I'd like to import my old one (on a different drive) to my new XPPro
installation, but "search" for "favourites" gives no results.

More about : favourites list

Anonymous
August 19, 2005 6:35:17 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

If American English, it's Favorites. If British or Canadian English,
substitute Favourites.

Internet Explorer...
[[To import bookmarks or favorites, on the File menu, click Import and
Export.
To export favorites to bookmarks or favorites on the same or another
computer, on the File menu, click Import and Export.

The exported favorites file is fairly small, so if you want to share the
favorite items with other people, you can copy it to a floppy disk or folder
on a network, or attach it to an e-mail message. ]]

To open Favorites folder...
Start | Run | Type: favorites | Click OK

%homepath%\Favorites

--
Hope this helps. Let us know.

Wes
MS-MVP Windows Shell/User

In news:E6mNe.11959$wh6.5611@newsfe2-win.ntli.net,
Silvabod <nospam@thank.you> hunted and pecked:
> Where would one find the "favourites" datafile (and/or, what is it
> called?) I'd like to import my old one (on a different drive) to my new
> XPPro installation, but "search" for "favourites" gives no results.
August 19, 2005 7:36:31 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Silvabod wrote:
> Where would one find the "favourites" datafile (and/or, what is it
> called?) I'd like to import my old one (on a different drive) to my
> new XPPro installation, but "search" for "favourites" gives no
> results.

That's because it's "favOrites" not "favOUrites"! I think in any case you
will have to allow Hidden and System Files in your search.

HTH
Related resources
August 20, 2005 12:18:54 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Wesley Vogel wrote:
> If American English, it's Favorites. If British or Canadian English,
> substitute Favourites.
>

I'm using Brit English and it's still "Favorites".....not "favourites"....
Anonymous
August 20, 2005 12:18:55 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Ya got me there, Gordon.

--
Hope this helps. Let us know.

Wes
MS-MVP Windows Shell/User

In news:eMZGaLPpFHA.3244@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl,
Gordon <gordon@gbpcomputing.co.uk.invalid> hunted and pecked:
> Wesley Vogel wrote:
>> If American English, it's Favorites. If British or Canadian English,
>> substitute Favourites.
>>
>
> I'm using Brit English and it's still "Favorites".....not "favourites"....
August 20, 2005 2:34:41 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Wesley Vogel wrote:
> Ya got me there, Gordon.

I'll check at work next Monday - they are all Brit English XP as well......

>
>
> In news:eMZGaLPpFHA.3244@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl,
> Gordon <gordon@gbpcomputing.co.uk.invalid> hunted and pecked:
>> Wesley Vogel wrote:
>>> If American English, it's Favorites. If British or Canadian
>>> English, substitute Favourites.
>>>
>>
>> I'm using Brit English and it's still "Favorites".....not
>> "favourites"....
Anonymous
August 20, 2005 4:48:42 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

DAMN!
I forgot that bloody Webster dictionary man.
"Favourite" (correct spellling, in any/every English dictionary) is spelt
"favorite" in his abominable dictionary that purports to be English, but
isn't.
No offense intended. I'm reasonably competent in my native language, but got
thrown on this occasion by deviant spelling.
Webster's dictionary "simplified" English spellings in the late 19th
century, to cater for educating the mass of non-English speaking US
immigrants and their children in "English".

Thanks, folks, for the pointer. It solved the problem, I found what I was
looking for.

My fault, should have remembered that Bill Gates and co. are US citizens,
not English (despite Bill's honourary [US, honorary] Knighthood bestowed by
H.M the Queen of England (also that "UK English" settings do not apply to
system files in MS products).

"Silvabod" <nospam@thank.you> wrote in message
news:E6mNe.11959$wh6.5611@newsfe2-win.ntli.net...
> Where would one find the "favourites" datafile (and/or, what is it
> called?)
> I'd like to import my old one (on a different drive) to my new XPPro
> installation, but "search" for "favourites" gives no results.
>
>
August 20, 2005 12:46:06 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Silvabod wrote:
> DAMN!
> I forgot that bloody Webster dictionary man.

ROTFL!

Two nations separated by a common language!
Anonymous
August 20, 2005 3:37:07 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

"Gordon" <gordon@gbpcomputing.co.uk.invalid> wrote in message
news:%230GB8sVpFHA.2472@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> Silvabod wrote:
>> DAMN!
>> I forgot that bloody Webster dictionary man.
>
> ROTFL!
>
> Two nations separated by a common language!

Agreed!
I'm lucky, I guess, that Ms Perspicacia Tick (that self-proclaimed defender
of "English" language and usage in ng's) didn't get in on this ... poor gal,
she owns only the one dictionary (Webster) and believes in it with faith
both absolute and unwavering.
If some-one was kind to her, and gifted her a real one, she would find not
only correct spellings, but also the deviant spellings too.
Last pronouncement I saw of hers was that the (only)plural of "forum" was
"fora" (per Webster, and her (US) English professor). Whilst (barely)
acceptable, it's defined as archaeic usage .... her rationale/lengthy
diatribe in correcting some poor (US) contributor who (correctly) used
"forums" had me ROTFL, too!
August 20, 2005 5:09:41 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Silvabod wrote:
> "Gordon" <gordon@gbpcomputing.co.uk.invalid> wrote in message
> news:%230GB8sVpFHA.2472@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> Silvabod wrote:
>>> DAMN!
>>> I forgot that bloody Webster dictionary man.
>>
>> ROTFL!
>>
>> Two nations separated by a common language!
>
> Agreed!
> I'm lucky, I guess, that Ms Perspicacia Tick (that self-proclaimed
> defender of "English" language and usage in ng's) didn't get in on
> this ... poor gal, she owns only the one dictionary (Webster) and
> believes in it with faith both absolute and unwavering.
> If some-one was kind to her, and gifted her a real one, she would
> find not only correct spellings, but also the deviant spellings too.
> Last pronouncement I saw of hers was that the (only)plural of "forum"
> was "fora"

I have to say as someone with a Classical education I would use "fora" as
well! (But not viri as the plural of virus......)
;-)
Anonymous
August 20, 2005 8:59:23 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

I had a pretty decent English education too, but "fora" !!?? I was over 60
years old before I ever saw the word (incidentally, it is NOT listed in my
dictionary as a stand-alone word, it is referenced only as a secondary
plural, under "forum"). Try Dictionary.com - it's referenced as a
middle-English word, i.e. archaeic. I rest my case.

I worked for DuPont for over 30 years, and IH before that. ... in a report
from a Belgian who spoke/wrote FIVE languages fluently (i.e, to business
standard) I kept getting lists with "idem" in data columns --- another
word/expression I'd never seen or heard. Looked it up - it means "referring
to a chapter/article previously cited" - but she was using it in lists,
instead of "ditto" (= "repeat of the column item immediately above")
..
I suggested that "ditto" was more appropriate, to avoid confusion - her boss
cited Webster and defended its usage as correct. That bloody Webster man
again!! Now he's invaded Belgium! :-)


"Gordon" <gordon@gbpcomputing.co.uk.invalid> wrote in message
news:o mG$OAYpFHA.420@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Silvabod wrote:
>> "Gordon" <gordon@gbpcomputing.co.uk.invalid> wrote in message
>> news:%230GB8sVpFHA.2472@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>>> Silvabod wrote:
>>>> DAMN!
>>>> I forgot that bloody Webster dictionary man.
>>>
>>> ROTFL!
>>>
>>> Two nations separated by a common language!
>>
>> Agreed!
>> I'm lucky, I guess, that Ms Perspicacia Tick (that self-proclaimed
>> defender of "English" language and usage in ng's) didn't get in on
>> this ... poor gal, she owns only the one dictionary (Webster) and
>> believes in it with faith both absolute and unwavering.
>> If some-one was kind to her, and gifted her a real one, she would
>> find not only correct spellings, but also the deviant spellings too.
>> Last pronouncement I saw of hers was that the (only)plural of "forum"
>> was "fora"
>
> I have to say as someone with a Classical education I would use "fora" as
> well! (But not viri as the plural of virus......)
> ;-)
>
Anonymous
August 20, 2005 9:14:13 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Salut/Hi Silvabod,

Just to be _thoroughly_ pedantic!

le/on Sat, 20 Aug 2005 00:48:42 GMT, tu disais/you said:-

>I forgot that bloody Webster dictionary man.
>"Favourite" (correct spellling, in any/every English dictionary) is spelt
>"favorite" in his abominable dictionary that purports to be English, but
>isn't.

(Well, to be fair Americans claim to speak English. As if American wasn't
good enough for them!!)

>My fault, should have remembered that Bill Gates and co. are US citizens,

No one who has anything to do with any Microsoft product can EVER forget
that any connection they may have with English is entirely accidental, and
largely by usurpation.

>not English (despite Bill's honourary [US, honorary]

here's my _real_ reason for writing, the previous remarks were entirely
tongue in cheek, not to be taken seriously and not intended to give offense
(or offence -UK). As I'm probably about to scream for help, it hardly
behoves (behooves US) me to antagonise (antagonize UK) most of the MVPs here
who are American!

Honorary is the correct spelling in the UK too!


--
All the Best
Ian Hoare
http://www.souvigne.com
mailbox full to avoid spam. try me at website
August 20, 2005 10:58:54 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Silvabod wrote:
> I had a pretty decent English education too, but "fora" !!?? I was
> over 60 years old before I ever saw the word (incidentally, it is NOT
> listed in my dictionary as a stand-alone word, it is referenced only
> as a secondary plural, under "forum"). Try Dictionary.com - it's
> referenced as a middle-English word, i.e. archaeic. I rest my case.

Forum -a Noun 4th Declension meaning a meeting place.

It's LATIN not English.
Anonymous
August 22, 2005 5:53:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

> Forum -a Noun 4th Declension meaning a meeting place.
>
> It's LATIN not English.

Oh, PLEASE! Given the subject/context has become "English" vocabulary, then
to say "fora" is Latin ....

Any reasonable "English" English dictionary includes upwards of 25,000
words, together with phonetic pronunciation AND the word's origin/probable
origin - (not possessing a "Webster", I am unaware whether he includes this
same level of information).
The "doyen" of dictionaries is of course the OED (Oxford English Dictionary)
which runs to about 5 volumes, (300,000+ words) updated frequently - it
lists EVERY word which has ever featured in the English language, and the
updates include the new ones embraced into English usage, whatever their
origin.

An English formal will reads "This is the last Will and Testament of ...."
(Did the Pilgrim Fathers import this form to the USA, I wonder?)
Did you know that this is a throwback to 1066 - (the last date that England
was successfully invaded)? William of Orange (from Normandy) defeated Harold
II (Saxon King of England) ... the relevance being that England was governed
from then on with both Norman and Saxon law running in parallel - "Will" and
"Testament" being Saxon and Norman legalese for one and the same thing?
And - that "duality" of law is still extant in English law, other than
wills?
Also, that the subsequent joining of the Kingdoms of England and Scotland
(King James VI of Scotland becoming James I of England) in 1601 led an
equally curious and still extant situation - despite the "United Kingdom"
thus created, the UK legal systems and courts set-up remain two-fold, one
for England and Wales, another for Scotland ? Legalese requires specific
words - all in the English dictionary.

Going back to the FIRST century AD - England was partly occupied by the
Romans for a couple of hundred years ... after that, we had invasions/raids
(and settlements) by the Vikings, and various other races. Plus, of course,
England (pre-1000 A.D.) was not a single kingdom, so had various languages
(from the Angles, Saxons, Picts, etc) and dialects (still does - try
understanding Geordie!). Not forgetting, of course, the influence of the
Galls - (Gaelic/Gallic depending on which exact location - still a living
language, it spans Scotland, Ireland, Wales, Cornwall and Brittany, in
France).

My point? - for over 2000 years, the English language has evolved/matured
from within these shores. Whatever their origin, we continue to import/use
words which have meaning/relevance, embracing them into the "English"
language.

Later, in the "Empire" centuries, we expanded our lexicon, taking in new
products/ideas (and descriptors) from the colonies/trading partners.
(Example - coffee. The English modified the Italian "caffe", which the
Eyties took from the Turkish "Kahve", who in turn took it from the Arabic
word "qahwah" (which actually means "coffee" or "wine").

Unlike the French language. General de Gaulle spent his post-war years
hating the Brits and the US for their refusal to recognise his "importance"
during WWII. As post-war President of France for many years, he consistently
blocked UK's entry into the Common Market (now, the EU) - but, in context
here, his main claim to fame is that he actually passed decrees FORBIDDING
and expunging "English" words which had crept into everyday usage in France.
Vive "le weekend!" (a survivor - there's no French word for it!)
But then, what do you expect from a nation which has the appalling disabilty
of being unable to count properly? Don't believe me? The French for "99" is
"quatre-vingts dix neuf" which literally translates to "Four 20's 10 9".
In Swiss-French - French used in Switzerland) , it's "Neufty-neuf" - an
Anglicised suffix to the "neuf"(9) to make "90"). True French hate it!

Back to US/English - I've an open mind on "234" as "two hundred and
thirty-four", or US "two hundred thirty four" - the English is an oddity.
"1234" is "One thousand two hundred and thirty four" ... no "and" between
the thousand and hundred, it only exists between the "hundreds" and "tens" -
but that's the beauty of the English language, it's FULL of such oddities!
Part of life's rich pattern (and that Webster man did his best to destroy
it!)

Silvabod
"Gordon" <gordon@gbpcomputing.co.uk.invalid> wrote in message
news:e%233rXDbpFHA.1204@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Silvabod wrote:
>> I had a pretty decent English education too, but "fora" !!?? I was
>> over 60 years old before I ever saw the word (incidentally, it is NOT
>> listed in my dictionary as a stand-alone word, it is referenced only
>> as a secondary plural, under "forum"). Try Dictionary.com - it's
>> referenced as a middle-English word, i.e. archaeic. I rest my case.
>
> Forum -a Noun 4th Declension meaning a meeting place.
>
> It's LATIN not English.
>
Anonymous
August 22, 2005 5:53:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Okeydoke, amigo.

Who cares about the French. How many French soldiers does it take to defend
Paris? No one knows, it has never been tried. ;-)

I was sitting on the patio looking at the remuda in the corral, took a bite
of my burrito wishing I had a taco instead, when I decided that I better hop
on my roan cow pony and go chase down some mavericks. Whoopee ti-yi-yo, git
along little dogies...

The Pilgrim Fathers "borrowed" all kinds of things from the English. 49 of
the 50 States have Counties, Louisiana has Parishes. Louisiana law is based
on Napoleonic law (Code Napoleon), not English common law. Louisiana
Purchase, doncha know. The Pilgrim Fathers just improved on everything that
they stole. US law includes all the good stuff from the English. We even
have William Blackstone books here in the Colonies.

BTW, interesting monologue. ;-)

--
Hope this helps. Let us know.

Wes
MS-MVP Windows Shell/User

In news:2NkOe.79$3n3.37@newsfe5-gui.ntli.net,
Silvabod <nospam@thank.you> hunted and pecked:
>> Forum -a Noun 4th Declension meaning a meeting place.
>>
>> It's LATIN not English.
>
> Oh, PLEASE! Given the subject/context has become "English" vocabulary,
> then to say "fora" is Latin ....
>
> Any reasonable "English" English dictionary includes upwards of 25,000
> words, together with phonetic pronunciation AND the word's origin/probable
> origin - (not possessing a "Webster", I am unaware whether he includes
> this same level of information).
> The "doyen" of dictionaries is of course the OED (Oxford English
> Dictionary) which runs to about 5 volumes, (300,000+ words) updated
> frequently - it lists EVERY word which has ever featured in the English
> language, and the updates include the new ones embraced into English
> usage, whatever their origin.
>
> An English formal will reads "This is the last Will and Testament of ...."
> (Did the Pilgrim Fathers import this form to the USA, I wonder?)
> Did you know that this is a throwback to 1066 - (the last date that
> England was successfully invaded)? William of Orange (from Normandy)
> defeated Harold II (Saxon King of England) ... the relevance being that
> England was governed from then on with both Norman and Saxon law running
> in parallel - "Will" and "Testament" being Saxon and Norman legalese for
> one and the same thing?
> And - that "duality" of law is still extant in English law, other than
> wills?
> Also, that the subsequent joining of the Kingdoms of England and Scotland
> (King James VI of Scotland becoming James I of England) in 1601 led an
> equally curious and still extant situation - despite the "United Kingdom"
> thus created, the UK legal systems and courts set-up remain two-fold, one
> for England and Wales, another for Scotland ? Legalese requires specific
> words - all in the English dictionary.
>
> Going back to the FIRST century AD - England was partly occupied by the
> Romans for a couple of hundred years ... after that, we had
> invasions/raids (and settlements) by the Vikings, and various other
> races. Plus, of course, England (pre-1000 A.D.) was not a single
> kingdom, so had various languages (from the Angles, Saxons, Picts, etc)
> and dialects (still does - try understanding Geordie!). Not forgetting,
> of course, the influence of the Galls - (Gaelic/Gallic depending on which
> exact location - still a living language, it spans Scotland, Ireland,
> Wales, Cornwall and Brittany, in France).
>
> My point? - for over 2000 years, the English language has evolved/matured
> from within these shores. Whatever their origin, we continue to import/use
> words which have meaning/relevance, embracing them into the "English"
> language.
>
> Later, in the "Empire" centuries, we expanded our lexicon, taking in new
> products/ideas (and descriptors) from the colonies/trading partners.
> (Example - coffee. The English modified the Italian "caffe", which the
> Eyties took from the Turkish "Kahve", who in turn took it from the Arabic
> word "qahwah" (which actually means "coffee" or "wine").
>
> Unlike the French language. General de Gaulle spent his post-war years
> hating the Brits and the US for their refusal to recognise his
> "importance" during WWII. As post-war President of France for many years,
> he consistently blocked UK's entry into the Common Market (now, the EU) -
> but, in context here, his main claim to fame is that he actually passed
> decrees FORBIDDING and expunging "English" words which had crept into
> everyday usage in France. Vive "le weekend!" (a survivor - there's no
> French word for it!)
> But then, what do you expect from a nation which has the appalling
> disabilty of being unable to count properly? Don't believe me? The
> French for "99" is "quatre-vingts dix neuf" which literally translates to
> "Four 20's 10 9".
> In Swiss-French - French used in Switzerland) , it's "Neufty-neuf" - an
> Anglicised suffix to the "neuf"(9) to make "90"). True French hate it!
>
> Back to US/English - I've an open mind on "234" as "two hundred and
> thirty-four", or US "two hundred thirty four" - the English is an oddity.
> "1234" is "One thousand two hundred and thirty four" ... no "and" between
> the thousand and hundred, it only exists between the "hundreds" and
> "tens" - but that's the beauty of the English language, it's FULL of such
> oddities! Part of life's rich pattern (and that Webster man did his best
> to destroy it!)
>
> Silvabod
> "Gordon" <gordon@gbpcomputing.co.uk.invalid> wrote in message
> news:e%233rXDbpFHA.1204@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>> Silvabod wrote:
>>> I had a pretty decent English education too, but "fora" !!?? I was
>>> over 60 years old before I ever saw the word (incidentally, it is NOT
>>> listed in my dictionary as a stand-alone word, it is referenced only
>>> as a secondary plural, under "forum"). Try Dictionary.com - it's
>>> referenced as a middle-English word, i.e. archaeic. I rest my case.
>>
>> Forum -a Noun 4th Declension meaning a meeting place.
>>
>> It's LATIN not English.
August 22, 2005 6:56:49 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

"Silvabod" <nospam@thank.you> wrote in message
news:2NkOe.79$3n3.37@newsfe5-gui.ntli.net
>> Forum -a Noun 4th Declension meaning a meeting place.
>>
>> It's LATIN not English.
>
> Oh, PLEASE! Given the subject/context has become "English"
> vocabulary, then to say "fora" is Latin ....

That's where the word came from - it's a DIRECT import from Latin.
Anonymous
August 23, 2005 2:32:55 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Why, thank'ee. kind Sir!
Good to see the product of aging brain cells and laborious 2-finger typing
(a skill I've never mastered, having a broken index one from youth doesn't
help) - is appreciated in the spirit it was composed. :-)
Silvabod

"Wesley Vogel" <123WVogel955@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:%23oUVnszpFHA.1480@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Okeydoke, amigo.
>
> Who cares about the French. How many French soldiers does it take to
> defend
> Paris? No one knows, it has never been tried. ;-)
>
> I was sitting on the patio looking at the remuda in the corral, took a
> bite
> of my burrito wishing I had a taco instead, when I decided that I better
> hop
> on my roan cow pony and go chase down some mavericks. Whoopee ti-yi-yo,
> git
> along little dogies...
>
> The Pilgrim Fathers "borrowed" all kinds of things from the English. 49
> of
> the 50 States have Counties, Louisiana has Parishes. Louisiana law is
> based
> on Napoleonic law (Code Napoleon), not English common law. Louisiana
> Purchase, doncha know. The Pilgrim Fathers just improved on everything
> that
> they stole. US law includes all the good stuff from the English. We even
> have William Blackstone books here in the Colonies.
>
> BTW, interesting monologue. ;-)
>
> --
> Hope this helps. Let us know.
>
> Wes
> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>
> In news:2NkOe.79$3n3.37@newsfe5-gui.ntli.net,
> Silvabod <nospam@thank.you> hunted and pecked:
>>> Forum -a Noun 4th Declension meaning a meeting place.
>>>
>>> It's LATIN not English.
>>
>> Oh, PLEASE! Given the subject/context has become "English" vocabulary,
>> then to say "fora" is Latin ....
>>
>> Any reasonable "English" English dictionary includes upwards of 25,000
>> words, together with phonetic pronunciation AND the word's
>> origin/probable
>> origin - (not possessing a "Webster", I am unaware whether he includes
>> this same level of information).
>> The "doyen" of dictionaries is of course the OED (Oxford English
>> Dictionary) which runs to about 5 volumes, (300,000+ words) updated
>> frequently - it lists EVERY word which has ever featured in the English
>> language, and the updates include the new ones embraced into English
>> usage, whatever their origin.
>>
>> An English formal will reads "This is the last Will and Testament of
>> ...."
>> (Did the Pilgrim Fathers import this form to the USA, I wonder?)
>> Did you know that this is a throwback to 1066 - (the last date that
>> England was successfully invaded)? William of Orange (from Normandy)
>> defeated Harold II (Saxon King of England) ... the relevance being that
>> England was governed from then on with both Norman and Saxon law running
>> in parallel - "Will" and "Testament" being Saxon and Norman legalese for
>> one and the same thing?
>> And - that "duality" of law is still extant in English law, other than
>> wills?
>> Also, that the subsequent joining of the Kingdoms of England and Scotland
>> (King James VI of Scotland becoming James I of England) in 1601 led an
>> equally curious and still extant situation - despite the "United Kingdom"
>> thus created, the UK legal systems and courts set-up remain two-fold, one
>> for England and Wales, another for Scotland ? Legalese requires specific
>> words - all in the English dictionary.
>>
>> Going back to the FIRST century AD - England was partly occupied by the
>> Romans for a couple of hundred years ... after that, we had
>> invasions/raids (and settlements) by the Vikings, and various other
>> races. Plus, of course, England (pre-1000 A.D.) was not a single
>> kingdom, so had various languages (from the Angles, Saxons, Picts, etc)
>> and dialects (still does - try understanding Geordie!). Not forgetting,
>> of course, the influence of the Galls - (Gaelic/Gallic depending on which
>> exact location - still a living language, it spans Scotland, Ireland,
>> Wales, Cornwall and Brittany, in France).
>>
>> My point? - for over 2000 years, the English language has evolved/matured
>> from within these shores. Whatever their origin, we continue to
>> import/use
>> words which have meaning/relevance, embracing them into the "English"
>> language.
>>
>> Later, in the "Empire" centuries, we expanded our lexicon, taking in new
>> products/ideas (and descriptors) from the colonies/trading partners.
>> (Example - coffee. The English modified the Italian "caffe", which the
>> Eyties took from the Turkish "Kahve", who in turn took it from the Arabic
>> word "qahwah" (which actually means "coffee" or "wine").
>>
>> Unlike the French language. General de Gaulle spent his post-war years
>> hating the Brits and the US for their refusal to recognise his
>> "importance" during WWII. As post-war President of France for many years,
>> he consistently blocked UK's entry into the Common Market (now, the EU) -
>> but, in context here, his main claim to fame is that he actually passed
>> decrees FORBIDDING and expunging "English" words which had crept into
>> everyday usage in France. Vive "le weekend!" (a survivor - there's no
>> French word for it!)
>> But then, what do you expect from a nation which has the appalling
>> disabilty of being unable to count properly? Don't believe me? The
>> French for "99" is "quatre-vingts dix neuf" which literally translates to
>> "Four 20's 10 9".
>> In Swiss-French - French used in Switzerland) , it's "Neufty-neuf" - an
>> Anglicised suffix to the "neuf"(9) to make "90"). True French hate it!
>>
>> Back to US/English - I've an open mind on "234" as "two hundred and
>> thirty-four", or US "two hundred thirty four" - the English is an oddity.
>> "1234" is "One thousand two hundred and thirty four" ... no "and" between
>> the thousand and hundred, it only exists between the "hundreds" and
>> "tens" - but that's the beauty of the English language, it's FULL of such
>> oddities! Part of life's rich pattern (and that Webster man did his best
>> to destroy it!)
>>
>> Silvabod
>> "Gordon" <gordon@gbpcomputing.co.uk.invalid> wrote in message
>> news:e%233rXDbpFHA.1204@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>>> Silvabod wrote:
>>>> I had a pretty decent English education too, but "fora" !!?? I was
>>>> over 60 years old before I ever saw the word (incidentally, it is NOT
>>>> listed in my dictionary as a stand-alone word, it is referenced only
>>>> as a secondary plural, under "forum"). Try Dictionary.com - it's
>>>> referenced as a middle-English word, i.e. archaeic. I rest my case.
>>>
>>> Forum -a Noun 4th Declension meaning a meeting place.
>>>
>>> It's LATIN not English.
>
Anonymous
August 24, 2005 9:01:30 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Salut/Hi Wesley Vogel,

le/on Mon, 22 Aug 2005 11:02:11 -0600, tu disais/you said:-

>Okeydoke, amigo.
>
>Who cares about the French. How many French soldiers does it take to defend
>Paris? No one knows, it has never been tried. ;-)

You ARE aware that the French lost some 3 million soldiers in the First
World War, are you?

--
All the Best
Ian Hoare
http://www.souvigne.com
mailbox full to avoid spam. try me at website
Anonymous
August 24, 2005 9:01:31 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

What does the French have to do with the "Favorites" list?
I think the 3 million mark must be a bit high that would be about the whole
country in WWI. The ones that were lost found their way to the USA or
Canada. But there must be a place to put these statistics other than the XP
Basics site. Maybe someone could post a link for them who are needing it

"Ian Hoare" <ianhoare@angelfire.com> wrote in message
news:3s2pg1lticeco43423pqg8vqd51u9crp8s@4ax.com...
> Salut/Hi Wesley Vogel,
>
> le/on Mon, 22 Aug 2005 11:02:11 -0600, tu disais/you said:-
>
>>Okeydoke, amigo.
>>
>>Who cares about the French. How many French soldiers does it take to
>>defend
>>Paris? No one knows, it has never been tried. ;-)
>
> You ARE aware that the French lost some 3 million soldiers in the First
> World War, are you?
>
> --
> All the Best
> Ian Hoare
> http://www.souvigne.com
> mailbox full to avoid spam. try me at website
!