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Instructions for Repair Installation

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  • Recovery Console
  • Windows XP
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Anonymous
August 19, 2005 6:37:28 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

One of my hard drives has developed a problem.
When running as Slave, I have done defrag and
full chkdsk/r and it comes out clean.

But when booting as single drive, it stops quickly
with message:

Windows\System32\config\system is missing.
You can attempt a repair installation by using
Installation CD, type 'r' at first screen.

I tried that, type 'r', and it took me to the
Recovery Console, where I selected the only
Windows system existing. It then took me to
a C: prompt, where many commands are available.
Some time ago, I printed out the KB article on
Recovery Console, but as I recall it, it was no
help in answering the question as to what to do,
to get the 'missing file' installed. Or to do a
'Repair Installation".....
--
William B. Lurie

More about : instructions repair installation

Anonymous
August 19, 2005 6:37:29 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

billurie@nospam.org wrote:
> One of my hard drives has developed a problem.
> When running as Slave, I have done defrag and
> full chkdsk/r and it comes out clean.
>
> But when booting as single drive, it stops quickly
> with message:
>
> Windows\System32\config\system is missing.
> You can attempt a repair installation by using
> Installation CD, type 'r' at first screen.
>
> I tried that, type 'r', and it took me to the
> Recovery Console, where I selected the only
> Windows system existing. It then took me to
> a C: prompt, where many commands are available.
> Some time ago, I printed out the KB article on
> Recovery Console, but as I recall it, it was no
> help in answering the question as to what to do,
> to get the 'missing file' installed. Or to do a
> 'Repair Installation".....


How to Recover from a Corrupted Registry that Prevents Windows XP from
Starting
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;307545

Once you've recovered, you might want to look here, as well:

How to Troubleshoot Registry Corruption Issues
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;822705



--

Bruce Chambers

Help us help you:
http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
both at once. - RAH
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 6:37:29 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

How to Perform a Windows XP Repair Install
http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/XPrepairinstall.htm

XP In Place Upgrade
http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/xp_in_place_upgrade.h...

How to perform an in-place upgrade (reinstallation) of Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;[LN];315341

--
Hope this helps. Let us know.

Wes
MS-MVP Windows Shell/User

In news:e83Is1OpFHA.420@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl,
billurie@nospam.org <billurie@nospam.org> hunted and pecked:
> One of my hard drives has developed a problem.
> When running as Slave, I have done defrag and
> full chkdsk/r and it comes out clean.
>
> But when booting as single drive, it stops quickly
> with message:
>
> Windows\System32\config\system is missing.
> You can attempt a repair installation by using
> Installation CD, type 'r' at first screen.
>
> I tried that, type 'r', and it took me to the
> Recovery Console, where I selected the only
> Windows system existing. It then took me to
> a C: prompt, where many commands are available.
> Some time ago, I printed out the KB article on
> Recovery Console, but as I recall it, it was no
> help in answering the question as to what to do,
> to get the 'missing file' installed. Or to do a
> 'Repair Installation".....
> --
> William B. Lurie
Related resources
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 8:04:15 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Bruce Chambers wrote:
> billurie@nospam.org wrote:
>
>> One of my hard drives has developed a problem.
>> When running as Slave, I have done defrag and
>> full chkdsk/r and it comes out clean.
>>
>> But when booting as single drive, it stops quickly
>> with message:
>>
>> Windows\System32\config\system is missing.
>> You can attempt a repair installation by using
>> Installation CD, type 'r' at first screen.
>>
>> I tried that, type 'r', and it took me to the
>> Recovery Console, where I selected the only
>> Windows system existing. It then took me to
>> a C: prompt, where many commands are available.
>> Some time ago, I printed out the KB article on
>> Recovery Console, but as I recall it, it was no
>> help in answering the question as to what to do,
>> to get the 'missing file' installed. Or to do a
>> 'Repair Installation".....
>
>
>
> How to Recover from a Corrupted Registry that Prevents Windows XP from
> Starting
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;307545
>
> Once you've recovered, you might want to look here, as well:
>
> How to Troubleshoot Registry Corruption Issues
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;822705
>
>
>
Thank you, those several of you who have provided links to
a number of KB and other articles on this subject. Following
any of the processes they lead to, involves lengthy, time-
consuming, and hazardous procedures. One might be tempted to
ask the question, "The system has detected that a file is
missing, and knows where it belongs, and of course that file
is on the installation CD, why doesn't a simple batch file
exist which will read it off the Installation CD and file
it where it belongs?".

I'll study those documents, including the very loud warnings
in bold red lettering, but for now I will follow my old
brute-force procedure: Copy the recently-updated files from
the damaged drive to a CD, make a new working clone from my
most recent backup hard drive, and update its files from the
CD.

--
William B. Lurie
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 8:37:07 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

billurie@nospam.org wrote:

>>
> Thank you, those several of you who have provided links to
> a number of KB and other articles on this subject. Following
> any of the processes they lead to, involves lengthy, time-
> consuming, and hazardous procedures. One might be tempted to
> ask the question, "The system has detected that a file is
> missing, and knows where it belongs, and of course that file
> is on the installation CD, why doesn't a simple batch file
> exist which will read it off the Installation CD and file
> it where it belongs?".
>

Ah! But the missing/corrupt file (C:\Windows\System32\Config\System)
does not exist in any way shape or form on the installation CD. The
file in question is an essential part of the Windows registry, and is
unique to *your* current installation.


> I'll study those documents, including the very loud warnings
> in bold red lettering, but for now I will follow my old
> brute-force procedure: Copy the recently-updated files from
> the damaged drive to a CD, make a new working clone from my
> most recent backup hard drive, and update its files from the
> CD.
>

Suit yourself, of course, but that's the hard way.


--

Bruce Chambers

Help us help you:
http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
both at once. - RAH
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 10:48:35 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

<billurie@nospam.org> wrote in message
news:e83Is1OpFHA.420@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> One of my hard drives has developed a problem.
> When running as Slave, I have done defrag and
> full chkdsk/r and it comes out clean.
>
> But when booting as single drive, it stops quickly
> with message:
>
> Windows\System32\config\system is missing.
> You can attempt a repair installation by using
> Installation CD, type 'r' at first screen.
>
> I tried that, type 'r', and it took me to the
> Recovery Console, where I selected the only
> Windows system existing. It then took me to
> a C: prompt, where many commands are available.
> Some time ago, I printed out the KB article on
> Recovery Console, but as I recall it, it was no
> help in answering the question as to what to do,
> to get the 'missing file' installed. Or to do a
> 'Repair Installation".....
> --
> William B. Lurie

Hi Bill. It is for this very reason that you expended countless hours
learning how to make full system backups. I bet you are glad now that you
did.

--

Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
www.webtree.ca/windowsxp
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 11:39:47 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Bruce Chambers wrote:
> billurie@nospam.org wrote:
>
>>>
>> Thank you, those several of you who have provided links to
>> a number of KB and other articles on this subject. Following
>> any of the processes they lead to, involves lengthy, time-
>> consuming, and hazardous procedures. One might be tempted to
>> ask the question, "The system has detected that a file is
>> missing, and knows where it belongs, and of course that file
>> is on the installation CD, why doesn't a simple batch file
>> exist which will read it off the Installation CD and file
>> it where it belongs?".
>>
>
> Ah! But the missing/corrupt file
> (C:\Windows\System32\Config\System) does not exist in any way shape or
> form on the installation CD. The file in question is an essential part
> of the Windows registry, and is unique to *your* current installation.
>
Ah, so! That does splain why it simply can't be copied
back.
>
>> I'll study those documents, including the very loud warnings
>> in bold red lettering, but for now I will follow my old
>> brute-force procedure: Copy the recently-updated files from
>> the damaged drive to a CD, make a new working clone from my
>> most recent backup hard drive, and update its files from the
>> CD.
>>
>
> Suit yourself, of course, but that's the hard way.
>
Hard way, perhaps, but straightforward and logical,
comprehensible, safe, and guaranteed to work. As you
say, chacun à son gout.
>


--
William B. Lurie
Anonymous
August 20, 2005 10:58:36 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Harry Ohrn wrote:
> <billurie@nospam.org> wrote in message
> news:e83Is1OpFHA.420@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>
>>One of my hard drives has developed a problem.
>>When running as Slave, I have done defrag and
>>full chkdsk/r and it comes out clean.
>>
>>But when booting as single drive, it stops quickly
>>with message:
>>
>>Windows\System32\config\system is missing.
>>You can attempt a repair installation by using
>>Installation CD, type 'r' at first screen.
>>
>>I tried that, type 'r', and it took me to the
>>Recovery Console, where I selected the only
>>Windows system existing. It then took me to
>>a C: prompt, where many commands are available.
>>Some time ago, I printed out the KB article on
>>Recovery Console, but as I recall it, it was no
>>help in answering the question as to what to do,
>>to get the 'missing file' installed. Or to do a
>>'Repair Installation".....
>>--
>> William B. Lurie
>
>
> Hi Bill. It is for this very reason that you expended countless hours
> learning how to make full system backups. I bet you are glad now that you
> did.
>
Quite true, Harry. I have come to learn that a system like
XP is so horribly intricate and complex that one really can
not use simple logic to solve what appears to be a simple
problem (e.g., 'file xxx missing'). Reading the KB instructions
for many of these 'repair' processes ends up with nested KB
articles, pages and pages of printout, and hours and hours of
study, and all I want is a good system and a reliable backup
always on hand. I hope that my aired frustations will teach
other people. You MVPs have certainly done great work with
direct answers, but systems like XP do not always respond to
or offer a simple and viable solution. For me, starting with
a good copy of the system seems to be the most economical.

--
William B. Lurie
Anonymous
August 20, 2005 6:43:19 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Bill

A repair install involves booting from the CD, waiting for the screen that
tells you to press R for repair (not R for recovery), accepting the EULA,
entering the key code, setting the language, and after 40 minutes or so, one
has a working XP..

After the initial load, do all of the updates, and THEN take an image which
you keep for times when your system collapses (except that it really
shouldn't if handled correctly)..

Hours of study are not required, neither do you have to print loads of
pages.. you should try to make things easier for yourself.. there is nothing
more difficult than thinking makes it..


--
Mike Hall
MVP - Windows Shell/User


<billurie@nospam.org> wrote in message
news:%231cr7YXpFHA.3380@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Harry Ohrn wrote:
>> <billurie@nospam.org> wrote in message
>> news:e83Is1OpFHA.420@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>>
>>>One of my hard drives has developed a problem.
>>>When running as Slave, I have done defrag and
>>>full chkdsk/r and it comes out clean.
>>>
>>>But when booting as single drive, it stops quickly
>>>with message:
>>>
>>>Windows\System32\config\system is missing.
>>>You can attempt a repair installation by using
>>>Installation CD, type 'r' at first screen.
>>>
>>>I tried that, type 'r', and it took me to the
>>>Recovery Console, where I selected the only
>>>Windows system existing. It then took me to
>>>a C: prompt, where many commands are available.
>>>Some time ago, I printed out the KB article on
>>>Recovery Console, but as I recall it, it was no
>>>help in answering the question as to what to do,
>>>to get the 'missing file' installed. Or to do a
>>>'Repair Installation".....
>>>--
>>> William B. Lurie
>>
>>
>> Hi Bill. It is for this very reason that you expended countless hours
>> learning how to make full system backups. I bet you are glad now that you
>> did.
>>
> Quite true, Harry. I have come to learn that a system like
> XP is so horribly intricate and complex that one really can
> not use simple logic to solve what appears to be a simple
> problem (e.g., 'file xxx missing'). Reading the KB instructions
> for many of these 'repair' processes ends up with nested KB
> articles, pages and pages of printout, and hours and hours of
> study, and all I want is a good system and a reliable backup
> always on hand. I hope that my aired frustations will teach
> other people. You MVPs have certainly done great work with
> direct answers, but systems like XP do not always respond to
> or offer a simple and viable solution. For me, starting with
> a good copy of the system seems to be the most economical.
>
> --
> William B. Lurie
Anonymous
August 20, 2005 11:54:54 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Mike Hall (MS-MVP) wrote:
> Bill
>
> A repair install involves booting from the CD, waiting for the screen that
> tells you to press R for repair (not R for recovery), accepting the EULA,
> entering the key code, setting the language, and after 40 minutes or so, one
> has a working XP..
>
> After the initial load, do all of the updates, and THEN take an image which
> you keep for times when your system collapses (except that it really
> shouldn't if handled correctly)..
>
> Hours of study are not required, neither do you have to print loads of
> pages.. you should try to make things easier for yourself.. there is nothing
> more difficult than thinking makes it..
>
>
Mike, I have to defer to your obviously superior knowledge and
authority, but it did not work for me the way you say. I must have done
something wrong, although the steps are so simple, I don't see how.
One authoritative message told me to select F8 somewhere along the
way, and I never saw an F8, I'll try it again. I'm sure I have a
drive with an OS that refuses to start. More than one.


--
William B. Lurie
Anonymous
August 21, 2005 12:46:37 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Mike Hall (MS-MVP) wrote:

> Bill
>
> A repair install involves booting from the CD, waiting for the screen that
> tells you to press R for repair (not R for recovery), accepting the EULA,
> entering the key code, setting the language, and after 40 minutes or so, one
> has a working XP..
>
> After the initial load, do all of the updates, and THEN take an image which
> you keep for times when your system collapses (except that it really
> shouldn't if handled correctly)..
>
> Hours of study are not required, neither do you have to print loads of
> pages.. you should try to make things easier for yourself.. there is nothing
> more difficult than thinking makes it..
>
>
Mike, part of my problem is that I accept expert advice and
try to follow it literally. Compare the first paragraph above
with the following, which you sent me on August 8th:

"Bill

Put the XP CD that you will use for the repair install into the CD tray and
boot from it.. do NOT take the first option to press 'R' for repair.. just
continue as if you were going to load XP for the first time..

Eventually, you are given the option to do a new install or REPAIR the
incumbent.. press F8 to continue with the repair.. you MAY have to activate
your XP over the telephone, but it tells you how to do that.."

Both sets of instructions seem simple and clear enough, but the August
8th set just didn't work for me. As I said, I'm sure I have another
drive here that I can try today's instruction on. I'll start it from
the CD, and see if it leads me to a screen that tells me to press R
for repair (and not R for recovery).



William B. Lurie
Anonymous
August 21, 2005 12:46:38 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Bill Mike did get things a bit out of order. You have to press F8 to accept
the license agreement and the next screen should give you the option to
Repair. At that point you press 'r' and the install begins. The screen looks
exactly like this http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/images/02_repair.jpg (of
course if your version is Windows XP Home then that will be displayed at the
top of the screen and not Windows XP Professional)

However if you see this screen
http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/images/02_repair2.jpg then you have either
pressed Esc, gone too far in the setup process or you can't do a repair
install for some reason.

Here are the correct steps
1) Boot with the XP CD
2) Press any key to boot the cd
3) Select the option "To setup Windows XP now press Enter"
http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/images/01_welcome_setup...
4) Accept the End User License Agreement press F8
http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/images/02_eula.jpg
5) Press R to repair as seen here
http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/images/02_repair.jpg
6) Setup will continue, you will not be asked where to install or to
partition or format. You will be prompted for your Product Key and a few
other settings a long the way. When finished you will need to reinstall
Critical Updates

--

Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


<billurie@nospam.org> wrote in message news:4307CEED.6050701@nospam.org...
> Mike Hall (MS-MVP) wrote:
>
>> Bill
>>
>> A repair install involves booting from the CD, waiting for the screen
>> that tells you to press R for repair (not R for recovery), accepting the
>> EULA, entering the key code, setting the language, and after 40 minutes
>> or so, one has a working XP..
>>
>> After the initial load, do all of the updates, and THEN take an image
>> which you keep for times when your system collapses (except that it
>> really shouldn't if handled correctly)..
>>
>> Hours of study are not required, neither do you have to print loads of
>> pages.. you should try to make things easier for yourself.. there is
>> nothing more difficult than thinking makes it..
>>
>>
> Mike, part of my problem is that I accept expert advice and
> try to follow it literally. Compare the first paragraph above
> with the following, which you sent me on August 8th:
>
> "Bill
>
> Put the XP CD that you will use for the repair install into the CD tray
> and
> boot from it.. do NOT take the first option to press 'R' for repair.. just
> continue as if you were going to load XP for the first time..
>
> Eventually, you are given the option to do a new install or REPAIR the
> incumbent.. press F8 to continue with the repair.. you MAY have to
> activate
> your XP over the telephone, but it tells you how to do that.."
>
> Both sets of instructions seem simple and clear enough, but the August 8th
> set just didn't work for me. As I said, I'm sure I have another
> drive here that I can try today's instruction on. I'll start it from
> the CD, and see if it leads me to a screen that tells me to press R
> for repair (and not R for recovery).
>
>
>
> William B. Lurie
Anonymous
August 21, 2005 1:16:20 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Mike Hall (MS-MVP) wrote:
> Bill
>
> A repair install involves booting from the CD, waiting for the screen that
> tells you to press R for repair (not R for recovery), accepting the EULA,
> entering the key code, setting the language, and after 40 minutes or so, one
> has a working XP..
>
> After the initial load, do all of the updates, and THEN take an image which
> you keep for times when your system collapses (except that it really
> shouldn't if handled correctly)..
>
> Hours of study are not required, neither do you have to print loads of
> pages.. you should try to make things easier for yourself.. there is nothing
> more difficult than thinking makes it..
>
>
Okay, Mike, I tried a drive which needed repair. I followed first
paragraph. Booted from XP Installation CD. It loaded all the files it
needed, then it read Windows Setup and said it was Starting Windows, and
then there appeared a screen giving me three options:

To set up Windows now, press Enter.

To repair using Recovery Console, press R.

To quit, Press F3.

I did *not* get to a screen telling me to press R for repair.

I'll await your further advice....





--
William B. Lurie
Anonymous
August 21, 2005 1:43:37 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Harry

Yes, the order might be out slightly.. I must make a note.. my memory is not
what it was, especially in the minutes directly after I have done
something..

--
Mike Hall
MVP - Windows Shell/User


"Harry Ohrn" <harry---@webtree.ca> wrote in message
news:uYCHb%23epFHA.1048@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> Bill Mike did get things a bit out of order. You have to press F8 to
> accept the license agreement and the next screen should give you the
> option to Repair. At that point you press 'r' and the install begins. The
> screen looks exactly like this
> http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/images/02_repair.jpg (of course if your
> version is Windows XP Home then that will be displayed at the top of the
> screen and not Windows XP Professional)
>
> However if you see this screen
> http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/images/02_repair2.jpg then you have either
> pressed Esc, gone too far in the setup process or you can't do a repair
> install for some reason.
>
> Here are the correct steps
> 1) Boot with the XP CD
> 2) Press any key to boot the cd
> 3) Select the option "To setup Windows XP now press Enter"
> http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/images/01_welcome_setup...
> 4) Accept the End User License Agreement press F8
> http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/images/02_eula.jpg
> 5) Press R to repair as seen here
> http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/images/02_repair.jpg
> 6) Setup will continue, you will not be asked where to install or to
> partition or format. You will be prompted for your Product Key and a few
> other settings a long the way. When finished you will need to reinstall
> Critical Updates
>
> --
>
> Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
> www.webtree.ca/windowsxp
>
>
> <billurie@nospam.org> wrote in message news:4307CEED.6050701@nospam.org...
>> Mike Hall (MS-MVP) wrote:
>>
>>> Bill
>>>
>>> A repair install involves booting from the CD, waiting for the screen
>>> that tells you to press R for repair (not R for recovery), accepting the
>>> EULA, entering the key code, setting the language, and after 40 minutes
>>> or so, one has a working XP..
>>>
>>> After the initial load, do all of the updates, and THEN take an image
>>> which you keep for times when your system collapses (except that it
>>> really shouldn't if handled correctly)..
>>>
>>> Hours of study are not required, neither do you have to print loads of
>>> pages.. you should try to make things easier for yourself.. there is
>>> nothing more difficult than thinking makes it..
>>>
>>>
>> Mike, part of my problem is that I accept expert advice and
>> try to follow it literally. Compare the first paragraph above
>> with the following, which you sent me on August 8th:
>>
>> "Bill
>>
>> Put the XP CD that you will use for the repair install into the CD tray
>> and
>> boot from it.. do NOT take the first option to press 'R' for repair..
>> just
>> continue as if you were going to load XP for the first time..
>>
>> Eventually, you are given the option to do a new install or REPAIR the
>> incumbent.. press F8 to continue with the repair.. you MAY have to
>> activate
>> your XP over the telephone, but it tells you how to do that.."
>>
>> Both sets of instructions seem simple and clear enough, but the August
>> 8th set just didn't work for me. As I said, I'm sure I have another
>> drive here that I can try today's instruction on. I'll start it from
>> the CD, and see if it leads me to a screen that tells me to press R
>> for repair (and not R for recovery).
>>
>>
>>
>> William B. Lurie
>
>
Anonymous
August 21, 2005 1:46:57 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Bill

You press ENTER to set up Windows, then you have to accept the EULA by
pressing F8.. Harry has done a really good piece for you.. it really is a
very simple procedure..

--
Mike Hall
MVP - Windows Shell/User


<billurie@nospam.org> wrote in message news:4307D5E4.2060201@nospam.org...
> Mike Hall (MS-MVP) wrote:
>> Bill
>>
>> A repair install involves booting from the CD, waiting for the screen
>> that tells you to press R for repair (not R for recovery), accepting the
>> EULA, entering the key code, setting the language, and after 40 minutes
>> or so, one has a working XP..
>>
>> After the initial load, do all of the updates, and THEN take an image
>> which you keep for times when your system collapses (except that it
>> really shouldn't if handled correctly)..
>>
>> Hours of study are not required, neither do you have to print loads of
>> pages.. you should try to make things easier for yourself.. there is
>> nothing more difficult than thinking makes it..
>>
>>
> Okay, Mike, I tried a drive which needed repair. I followed first
> paragraph. Booted from XP Installation CD. It loaded all the files it
> needed, then it read Windows Setup and said it was Starting Windows, and
> then there appeared a screen giving me three options:
>
> To set up Windows now, press Enter.
>
> To repair using Recovery Console, press R.
>
> To quit, Press F3.
>
> I did *not* get to a screen telling me to press R for repair.
>
> I'll await your further advice....
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> William B. Lurie
Anonymous
August 21, 2005 2:28:32 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Mike Hall (MS-MVP) wrote:

> Bill
>
> You press ENTER to set up Windows, then you have to accept the EULA by
> pressing F8.. Harry has done a really good piece for you.. it really is a
> very simple procedure..
>
Thank you both, Mike and Harry. Tomorrow I'll try the links
and more detailed instructions. I'm sure you understand how
I can get frustrated when I try to follow instructions
ostensibly from "the horse's mouth" and find that I can't
get to the screens and options they have given me. It's a
shame that the rest of the World has to see all this back and
forth chatter, with numerous false starts........but that's
what these blind bulletin boards are all about. Well, maybe
it will guide others. By the way, with all the Microsoft
genu-wine KB articles around, doesn't this specific task....a
"Repair Installation" deserve one.

--
William B. Lurie
Anonymous
August 21, 2005 3:54:10 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Bill

Michael Stevens did an excellent website more or less devoted to the various
installation methods for XP.. I gave you the link but it left you in a state
of confusion.. I recommend his site to everybody who asks about the various
ways to install XP, and the only person that has come back with questions is
you..

A quote out of one of your replies to me

".... and then there appeared a screen giving me three options:

To set up Windows now, press Enter.

To repair using Recovery Console, press R.

To quit, Press F3.

I did *not* get to a screen telling me to press R for repair.

I'll await your further advice...."

You get to the screen telling you to press R for repair by continuing to
install Windows.. common sense should tell you that you have to press ENTER
to continue to install Windows.. this is basic stuff.. you didn't want to
quit, and I told you not to do the R for recovery, and that only left the
one option to press ENTER to continue the install, which is your goal,
yes?..


--
Mike Hall
MVP - Windows Shell/User


<billurie@nospam.org> wrote in message
news:o WvVogfpFHA.1412@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Mike Hall (MS-MVP) wrote:
>
>> Bill
>>
>> You press ENTER to set up Windows, then you have to accept the EULA by
>> pressing F8.. Harry has done a really good piece for you.. it really is a
>> very simple procedure..
>>
> Thank you both, Mike and Harry. Tomorrow I'll try the links
> and more detailed instructions. I'm sure you understand how
> I can get frustrated when I try to follow instructions
> ostensibly from "the horse's mouth" and find that I can't
> get to the screens and options they have given me. It's a
> shame that the rest of the World has to see all this back and
> forth chatter, with numerous false starts........but that's
> what these blind bulletin boards are all about. Well, maybe
> it will guide others. By the way, with all the Microsoft
> genu-wine KB articles around, doesn't this specific task....a
> "Repair Installation" deserve one.
>
> --
> William B. Lurie
Anonymous
August 21, 2005 2:40:51 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

billurie@nospam.org wrote:
> Mike Hall (MS-MVP) wrote:
>
>> Bill
>>
>> You press ENTER to set up Windows, then you have to accept the EULA by
>> pressing F8.. Harry has done a really good piece for you.. it really
>> is a very simple procedure..
>>
> Thank you both, Mike and Harry. Tomorrow I'll try the links
> and more detailed instructions. I'm sure you understand how
> I can get frustrated when I try to follow instructions
> ostensibly from "the horse's mouth" and find that I can't
> get to the screens and options they have given me. It's a
> shame that the rest of the World has to see all this back and
> forth chatter, with numerous false starts........but that's
> what these blind bulletin boards are all about. Well, maybe
> it will guide others. By the way, with all the Microsoft
> genu-wine KB articles around, doesn't this specific task....a
> "Repair Installation" deserve one.
>
Harry and Mike:

Did as Harry outlined in Aug 20 PM posting. It worked (of course).
After it completed, I installed SP2 from CD, not without some
glitches,'File may not have been installed or it has
been corrupted'.....I clicked 'OK', having no alternative, and
not knowing if this would cause an abort later.
'Software Installed...has not passed Windows Logo test for
compatibility'.....again, I had no choice but to accept.

It did not give me the option to Activate later, so I did it and
it accepted my Product Key immediately.

I did all this on a backup hard drive. In a week, waiting for the
Activation to cool down, I expect to do the same on my Master Drive.
For some reason, the simple keychanger would not accept the Product
Key which obviously is valid, since it activated fine as stated above.

Thank you again, Harry.....it's too bad I somehow couldn't manage
to do the Repair Installation with any other set of instructions,
but it really only takes one, when it's specific enough.

It did not give me the

--
William B. Lurie
Anonymous
August 29, 2005 5:30:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

One more time, Mike. I was forced to do a Repair Installation
today.....on a Recovered Drive Image that just
didn't want to boot. Followed simple steps, took three tries
to get it to accept the key code, but then it slogged on to
completion.

When I booted the drive, it came on like a new installation....
all of the files and folders and applications were there,
even in Program Files. But no icons, no startup loading....
when of course I was hoping to have both. Were my expectations
too high, or did I overlook something?

Bill Lurie

Mike Hall (MS-MVP) wrote:
> Bill
>
> A repair install involves booting from the CD, waiting for the screen that
> tells you to press R for repair (not R for recovery), accepting the EULA,
> entering the key code, setting the language, and after 40 minutes or so, one
> has a working XP..
>
> After the initial load, do all of the updates, and THEN take an image which
> you keep for times when your system collapses (except that it really
> shouldn't if handled correctly)..
>
> Hours of study are not required, neither do you have to print loads of
> pages.. you should try to make things easier for yourself.. there is nothing
> more difficult than thinking makes it..
>
>


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