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A+ Certified test

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June 19, 2008 2:07:11 AM

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My question is what is the cheapest way to get A+ Certitfied?

More about : certified test

June 19, 2008 2:09:03 AM

take it at a community college. or work for a company that allows you to take it for free in order to forward your 'career' with them.
June 19, 2008 2:18:11 AM

A+ Certification is worthless unless you want to make $15/hr in a repair shop or you want to teach it in a high school.
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June 19, 2008 2:22:00 AM

yeah its worthless, but its something you can put on your resume.
June 19, 2008 2:23:03 AM

BadMannerKorea said:
yeah its worthless, but its something you can put on your resume.


True enough. If you can get it free great, but its not worth the $290 or whatever CompTIA charges these days.
June 19, 2008 2:40:17 AM

I'm only 18 years old and I own my own business. Its a partnership structured business that's been going on for over 2 years. I need to be certified just for show. Plus $15 an hour doesn't sound bad to me. :) 

Ive searched google for A+ vouchers and all I can find is like $20 off original price.

Another question i would appreciate you guys help me on is what certification should i get?

CompTIA A+ 220-602
This is a certification for IT Technician. It targets those who work in mobile or corporate technical environment with a high level of face-to-face interaction. Job roles include IT admin, enterprise technician, field service technician, and PC support technician.

CompTIA A+ 220-603
For remote support technician. This is for individuals who intend to work in remote based work environment. Job roles include help desk technician, remote support technician, and call center technician.

CompTIA A+ 220-604
This is for depot technician. This targets those where their job has an emphasis on hardware. Job roles are bench technician and depot technician.

I think I should get the CompTIA A+ 220-604 but i think it might not even matter since all of them make you A+.
June 19, 2008 2:40:21 AM

If you don't get an A+ and get a D, you can still work at radio shack or the electronics dept. of walmart as an expert.
June 19, 2008 3:40:28 AM

I would also consider going to college and getting a degree. The certification is great as well, but where I'm working at, when I was interviewed, my bosses liked the fact that I had a degree. Though I had little professional experience, I had a 4 year degree, and what my boss told me was that most guys when they start college know that what they will learn is obsolete by the time they get out, but liked the fact that it showed I would be dedicated. I am loving my job. Been there about 6 months, it's wonderful. Something to consider as well, but like some 2 year technical colleges will try to get you certified before you leave.
June 19, 2008 3:42:45 AM

Another one to have may be Apple certification, at least later on. Probably not many people have that, and it would give you an edge. I actually possess that certification, and not bad to get, I think I had to take 2 tests at like 150 each or something? Can't remember, but my work paid for the first attempts, thankfully I passed them both on the first try. But the exams were all multiple choice.
June 19, 2008 3:43:29 AM

Wal-mart has experts? You don't say rc.
June 19, 2008 3:48:40 AM

shadowduck said:
Wal-mart has experts? You don't say rc.


lol...not REAL experts, just people that really really tech illiterate people THINK know something...lmao.

I heard a guy ask the difference between the -r and +r standards once and the kid said +r was better because it was newer ! rofl.
June 19, 2008 3:50:17 AM

Nice. Ask them what is the difference between front side bus and a on-die memory controller.
June 19, 2008 4:09:45 AM

If your a student, the Microsoft Exams are around $70. They're good certs since most companies run on Microsoft software and there's lots of study material for them :p 
June 19, 2008 4:14:46 AM

Actually, didn't MS just bring out a new certification? Or am I the only one that read that?
June 19, 2008 4:23:15 AM

shadowduck said:
A+ Certification is worthless unless you want to make $15/hr in a repair shop or you want to teach it in a high school.


What's so worthless about it? It's a certification and it'll look good on a resume and in the eyes of a customer.
June 19, 2008 4:32:58 AM

Uh..not really. Now when you have a list like this on your resume...A+ doesn't really stand out. And Yes I have all of them.

Certifications
Microsoft Certified IT Professional: Enterprise Administrator
Microsoft Certified IT Professional: Server Administrator
Microsoft Certified IT Professional: Consumer Desktop Support
Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist: Windows Server 2008 – Active Directory Configuration
Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist: Windows Server 2008 – Network Infrastructure Configuration
Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist: Windows Server 2008 – Application Platform Configuration
Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist: Windows Vista Configuration
Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer Windows Server 2003
Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator Windows Server 2003
Microsoft Certified Professional
CompTIA Security +
CompTIA A+
CompTIA Network+
June 19, 2008 4:47:31 AM

I agree with you, in fact I'm willing to go so far as to say not a single cert you have will necessarily stand out on its own merits without the others to back it up (unless your job requires you to have one of those certs). But, hey, I could be wrong.

Regardless, the OP is just starting out and doesn't have a certification. Clearly if A+ is your only certification then it will definitely stand out over someone who doesn't have a certification at all.
June 19, 2008 4:54:13 AM

But, for someone who's just starting out, and who's 18 years old, I think an A+ certification would be a good place to start. That said, it'd probably still also look good if you are intending to go to college down the road.

I know I started out just because I wanted to play video games. My first pc was a 200 mhz AMD K6 with 32 mb of ram, back in about 97? My first computer though was a commodore 64 at about the age of 5 or so. But I got into computers more with the AMD K6 system, wanted to game, and my system started getting too slow, I was probably 17 or so when I first got that computer. But dad and I got into this deal, he bought me for Christmas a year or 2 later a chip that was supposed to fit the mainboard I had and was supposed to be 400 mhz. Well, it didn't work. My birthday is 5 days after Christmas, so we ended up taking that back, heading to the micro center, and looked at a 400 mhz pentium 2 which was what I thought I wanted at the time. 200 bucks. Dad said no way.

I remember we decided to stop in at a best buy and they had these 450 mhz AMD K6 2 chips for like 100 bucks. Of course that was half what the intel was, so the rest is history. We started building our systems together, doing upgrades and stuff, always liked AMD though. Never actually owned but maybe 1-2 systems with intel chips. And they were laptops. Suffice it to say, I got married almost 2 years ago, but dad and I still have our hobby. Even though I live 8 hours away or so now, I was still on an Athlon 64 3500+. Wanted to upgrade, dad suprises me at Christmas with this new 5200 x2 chip, sli board, 2 gb of ram. New case and all except video card, but I had one to throw in. So we built another one.

Basically, I had started wanting just to play games, but it ended up as a career for me. Dad and I did upgrades and builds together, and I went to college, and about 6 months ago, was blessed with my 1st real IT job after working at walmart for a while. But hey, I was married, you do what you have to in order to make it work.

To some, one little certification may not be much, but to the op, get that certification, learn all you can dude, if you want to, maybe go to school for it. Anything you can put up there to show your customers you know what your doing. You show them that you care about them genuinely, and that you will stand behind your product and that you know what your doing, and I think you will do just fine. Again also consider the Apple Certification. If you can have the versatility of knowing Mac and Windows, you have a leg up on the guys that just do windows.

You guys may tell me macs are worthless, but I actually didn't care much for Macs either. But that's what 90% of my job deals with, so that's what I know, but I also know XP, Vista, windows 98, 95. So a bit of everything. Besides, it can be kind of fun to tear into one of those old ibook g4 notebooks. Had one today just replaced a busted lcd screen and a hard drive on it, it's now sitting at work charging the battery up ready to go back out asap.
June 19, 2008 4:58:18 AM

I say it is worthless because it will not improve the quality of the job he can get, the test is grossly outdated and its $290.

June 19, 2008 5:51:44 AM

Thanks ohiou_grad _06 I too got into computers via video games. A+ does sound like an ridiculous expense but anything for the customer. Oh well i got nothing to worry about my grandma said she would pay for the test.
June 19, 2008 5:55:40 AM

If you guys would please answer my question. For those of you that are new to the new A+ exam it works like this. You must take the A+ essentials and then from there you can take any of the three sub A+ test as follows:

CompTIA A+ 220-602
This is a certification for IT Technician. It targets those who work in mobile or corporate technical environment with a high level of face-to-face interaction. Job roles include IT admin, enterprise technician, field service technician, and PC support technician.

CompTIA A+ 220-603
For remote support technician. This is for individuals who intend to work in remote based work environment. Job roles include help desk technician, remote support technician, and call center technician.

CompTIA A+ 220-604
This is for depot technician. This targets those where their job has an emphasis on hardware. Job roles are bench technician and depot technician.

Which test should i take to get A+ ?
June 19, 2008 6:32:06 AM

I am actually studying for the A+ myself! Im only 15 and my dad said even though its not that important, its a place to start. Plus the fact he has all these CD's about it lol.
Yes its outdated, yes its old, yes there are many other certifications out there that are much more important, but its a good place to start.

To answer the question of the OP:
I personally am trying to do pass all the test, but from what ive read online, the first one to get is usually the 220-602. But ive also read that it depends on what your situation is, on which test to get first.

Also, in case your wondering, im not completely sure about this, but I believe to get "certified" you have to complete at least 2 out of the 4 test. Im not sure if im correct though. Go to comptia's web site and make sure.
June 19, 2008 6:36:06 AM

ohiou_grad_06 said:
I would also consider going to college and getting a degree. The certification is great as well, but where I'm working at, when I was interviewed, my bosses liked the fact that I had a degree. Though I had little professional experience, I had a 4 year degree, and what my boss told me was that most guys when they start college know that what they will learn is obsolete by the time they get out, but liked the fact that it showed I would be dedicated. I am loving my job. Been there about 6 months, it's wonderful. Something to consider as well, but like some 2 year technical colleges will try to get you certified before you leave.


I just have a quick question... what is your job exactly, and what did you get your degree in? Because I'm just going to start college at the end of the summer. And so far I have been hoping to work for Intel/AMD/Nvidia designing chips, because it really interests me and makes pretty good money. And trust me, I would have the mental capacity. But looking at this, really a more interesting and fun job for me might be just some kind of IT tech thing. I really enjoy working on and fixing computers... so I really don't know.

The money isn't completely important to me. I'd like to be financially comfortable (I think everyone would) but I also think it's more important to be doing something you love. And while I do think I'd love designing the chips.... it seems like it'd be pretty high stress.

computerman0416 said:
Uh..not really. Now when you have a list like this on your resume...A+ doesn't really stand out. And Yes I have all of them.

Certifications
Microsoft Certified IT Professional: Enterprise Administrator
Microsoft Certified IT Professional: Server Administrator
Microsoft Certified IT Professional: Consumer Desktop Support
Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist: Windows Server 2008 – Active Directory Configuration
Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist: Windows Server 2008 – Network Infrastructure Configuration
Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist: Windows Server 2008 – Application Platform Configuration
Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist: Windows Vista Configuration
Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer Windows Server 2003
Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator Windows Server 2003
Microsoft Certified Professional
CompTIA Security +
CompTIA A+
CompTIA Network+


I'm also interested in knowing what you do, if you both don't mind me asking.


June 19, 2008 6:42:34 AM

lasttarget said:
If you guys would please answer my question. For those of you that are new to the new A+ exam it works like this. You must take the A+ essentials and then from there you can take any of the three sub A+ test as follows:

CompTIA A+ 220-602
This is a certification for IT Technician. It targets those who work in mobile or corporate technical environment with a high level of face-to-face interaction. Job roles include IT admin, enterprise technician, field service technician, and PC support technician.

CompTIA A+ 220-603
For remote support technician. This is for individuals who intend to work in remote based work environment. Job roles include help desk technician, remote support technician, and call center technician.

CompTIA A+ 220-604
This is for depot technician. This targets those where their job has an emphasis on hardware. Job roles are bench technician and depot technician.

Which test should i take to get A+ ?


According to this, I would say go for the 220-602.

Just look at the chart thing
June 19, 2008 12:38:26 PM

Myself, I'm working for a school district as a computer tech. Though I'm learning more about everything there, I'm the only guy there now certified to do hardware repairs under warranty on our apple products. So I can actually save money by some things not having to be shipped back to apple.

But my degree is a Bachelor of Science in Communications. IT basically.
June 19, 2008 5:06:31 PM

Quote:
I am actually studying for the A+ myself! Im only 15 and my dad said even though its not that important, its a place to start. Plus the fact he has all these CD's about it lol.
Yes its outdated, yes its old, yes there are many other certifications out there that are much more important, but its a good place to start.


Suicide silence, this is off topic and presumptuous I know, please forgive me, but speaking for dads everywhere I am concerned that your nickname and avatar are going to scare your poor dad to death.
June 19, 2008 5:20:57 PM

Yadge,

If you want to work on chips you need to go school and major in electrical engineering at somewhere like VA Tech, NC State, GA Tech etc.

Be prepared to have no life for 4 years.
June 19, 2008 6:18:13 PM

notherdude said:
Quote:
I am actually studying for the A+ myself! Im only 15 and my dad said even though its not that important, its a place to start. Plus the fact he has all these CD's about it lol.
Yes its outdated, yes its old, yes there are many other certifications out there that are much more important, but its a good place to start.


Suicide silence, this is off topic and presumptuous I know, please forgive me, but speaking for dads everywhere I am concerned that your nickname and avatar are going to scare your poor dad to death.


HAHA yes Ive heard that before. SuicideSilence is a favorite band of mine. I listen to all kinds of music, but mostly hardcore/death metal. My avatar is a piece of there new CD lol. And yes my dad used to hate the music I listen too, he got used to it I guess. Im not some emo kid who cuts himself or any thing rofl. Thanks for asking though I really appreciate it! :hello: 

Just in case your wondering, this might scare you, but heres the link to SuicideSilence's my space page. Give them a listen. You might like it...
http://www.myspace.com/suicidesilence

June 19, 2008 6:57:42 PM

shadowduck said:
Yadge,

If you want to work on chips you need to go school and major in electrical engineering at somewhere like VA Tech, NC State, GA Tech etc.

Be prepared to have no life for 4 years.


Agreed. I know people in engineering school and its bad, so bad, they have a class to teach engineering students how to be more social LOL.

A+ is pretty much worthless unless you're young and in HS. If you are in HS, get it and make sure you keep up with certs and try to get as many as possible. It will help you when trying to find a job after HS. It sucks even more now that they have what, 3 different tests? I'm glad I got mine when it was just hardware/software.
June 19, 2008 10:02:34 PM

shadowduck said:
Yadge,

If you want to work on chips you need to go school and major in electrical engineering at somewhere like VA Tech, NC State, GA Tech etc.

Be prepared to have no life for 4 years.


Yeah, I wasn't sure if I should do Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering, or Computer Science. They're pretty similar....

But I think I can handle it.
June 19, 2008 10:54:42 PM

Myself, I just enjoy working on computers. Pays decently, and hey, where else can I have fun tearing apart laptops? lol. On a side note, we just got in some new 20 inch iMacs to play with. ought to be fun:) 
!