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PSU for ATX Pent IV to replace orig Newton NPS-250EB A

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August 10, 2008 6:05:37 AM

Hi, All!
I am trying to replace the blown out Newton (NPS-250EB A) PSU in my older Gateway 710XL computer. The original PSU was only 250Watts and I would like to increase that to at least 350-400Watts with the replacement, if I could. My questions for the forum are:
1) Can I go from a 250W to a 400-450W PSU in this computer? Or is there such a thing as too much power?

2) The Dynex 400W PSU I bought as a replacement does not have the P10 connector that the Newton had. Thus, I am short one connection on the motherboard. Would this cause the PSU not to fire up at all when I tested it after having connected all other cables?

3) Where can I get a PSU with the extra P10 cable? Hardly any of the PSU's I have found online have it.

4) If I can't get a PSU that fits my case with the P10 cable, is it possible to get an adapter of some sort to that I can plug into one of the unused SATA connectors on one side and plug the other end into the P10 slot on the motherboard? Would this cause any power/heat problems?

5) The old Newton has a fan bolted to the external top. None of the PSU's I've seen on the market today have this. Is this necessary for cooling or just an added bonus that Gateway installed? It sits right next to the heat sink and I suppose it used to do a good job of blowing cool air right over the sink. But can I get away without this arrangement now?

Sorry to be so full of questions but I'm more of a software guru. I don't usually work on hardware. But I couldn't see paying $150 to the local teenager to install a new PSU when it's just a matter of a few snap in plugs! :kaola: 

Thanks! :) 

More about : psu atx pent replace orig newton nps 250eb

August 10, 2008 6:23:20 AM

Good PSU aren't Cheap.
Not really such a thing as too much power, its all 12v/5v the more watts, make it more upgradable later. You may want more like 600W for a High Power PCI-e GFX Card, assuming ur not on AGP, then 550W should do.
but a 300w will allow for more HDD's, fans, lights, etc..

You need to make sure that it has the right motherboard connection.
I'm guessing a (20pin) + (p4 which is 4pin).
Dunno what a P10 cable is? Think you mean p4? 4pin mobo connector?

http://www.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=2159142
They sell a 300w PSU that is compatible with ur old Newton (NPS-250EB A)

Check Specs for PSU temparatures, some have better cooling than others.
Try ThermalTake, OCZ, PC power & Cooling, Coolmaster.
They are all top brands, you pay for what you get though, and power can be the difference in a stable system and one that reboots when it feels like its overworked.

August 10, 2008 11:23:46 PM

Quote:
You need to make sure that it has the right motherboard connection.
I'm guessing a (20pin) + (p4 which is 4pin).
Dunno what a P10 cable is? Think you mean p4? 4pin mobo connector?


No, it's labled a P10 on my Newton or otherwise called an Auxiallary connection or AUX X1 on most other graphics I've seen.

Quote:
http://www.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=2159142
They sell a 300w PSU that is compatible with ur old Newton (NPS-250EB A)


The AUX X1 connection on this graphic is the connection I need. I have not been able to find it on anything other than the "cheaper" models like Dynex that are only up to 300Watts.

Quote:
Check Specs for PSU temparatures, some have better cooling than others.
Try ThermalTake, OCZ, PC power & Cooling, Coolmaster.
They are all top brands, you pay for what you get though, and power can be the difference in a stable system and one that reboots when it feels like its overworked.


I'd LOVE to get a ThermalTake or CoolMaster. Unfortunately, I am limited to a 5.5" x 3.5"x 6" size and all the higher wattage and better brands are just slightly too large. I made that mistake already by already purchasing the ThermalTake 450W and trying to shoe-horn it into the space alloted; it just would not fit. Upon returning it, I found the only one in the entire store that would fit was the Best Buy Dynex 400W which gets lousy reviews on every message board I read. Lucky me! :cry: 

Any other suggestions?

Thanks.
October 21, 2008 6:24:07 PM

Try this link for pigtail adaptor:

http://www.atxpowersupplies.com/6-pin-aux-connector-adapter.php

or this one

http://www.power-on.com/connectors-adapters.html

The second item on the page titled "ATX to ATX12V Adapter" has the P10 (also known as Aux, Aux 1 or P2 on some power supplies) connector you need. It also has the 4 pin P4 connector that you may already have comming from your power supply. Here is the picture of it.



The power supplies that conform your system were originaly the ATX12V 1.0 thru ATX12V 1.3. The conector is a Molex 90331-0010 6 pin connector which is the same connector as the old AT P8 or P9 power connectors. Some power supplies say they are ATX12V 1.3 but are missing the Aux Power Connector.

Replacement power supplies with the Aux plug can be found here:

http://www.atxpowersupplies.com/300-watt-power-supply-fsp-atx-300-gu.php 300W
http://www.atxpowersupplies.com/300-watt-power-supply-fsp300-60pln.php 300W
http://www.atxpowersupplies.com/400-watt-power-supply-ap-mps3atx40.php 400W*
*(only 4 inches in length, so may be to short as in my St Francis case that does not have screws to hold it in unless you drill your own holes for it.)


If you want to checkout the power supply design guides, try:

http://www.formfactors.org/search.asp?q1=ATX12V

As a side note, I have a Gateway 700S that uses this same connector, but when I asked the tech support if it was required, they informed me:

"Thank you for using Gateway's Online email support. Please note that connecting the P10 connector is optional. If the computer works properly using the alternative connection, you can ignore this connection."

You might just send a support request to the company or the maker of the motherboard and ask if it is needed.

Or you could just plug it in and see if the system boots.

Aloha! :sol: 
!