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1920x1200x60 PC monitor on HDTV?

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  • Monitors
  • Home Theatre
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Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 17, 2005 12:25:20 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Gang -

I've been waiting for entrepreneurship to provide a way to get a
1920x1200x60 PC monitor onto an HDTV. Can anybody tell me if such a
capability exists?

This is in a corporate environment, so I can spend more than one would
for a home installation. For instance I could by a projection system if
that's the answer. I haven't yet found a scaler that goes that big a
screen size.

Thanks for any interest.

....best, Hash

More about : 1920x1200x60 monitor hdtv

Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 17, 2005 12:58:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

(Hash@example.org) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
> I've been waiting for entrepreneurship to provide a way to get a
> 1920x1200x60 PC monitor onto an HDTV. Can anybody tell me if such a
> capability exists?

If you can live with 1920x1080, there are quite a few very large (45-60")
fixed pixel displays (LCD, DLP, LCoS) that you can just plug a PC into
(either VGA or DVI).

If you must have 1920x1200, about 30" is the biggest PC monitor that
has that many pixels.

--
Jeff Rife | "Tragedy struck today in Sector Nine as rebel
| terrorists blew up the Death Star, killing
| thousands. The Rebel Alliance, a fringe group
| of anti-Empire fanatics, has claimed
| responsibility for the terrorist act.
| Fortunately, Lord Vader escaped without harm.
| Our hearts go out to the families of the
| victims."
| -- "NewsRadio"
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 17, 2005 5:14:56 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Hash@example.org wrote in news:QnJWe.24279$8q.23961@lakeread01:

> Gang -
>
> I've been waiting for entrepreneurship to provide a way to get a
> 1920x1200x60 PC monitor onto an HDTV. Can anybody tell me if such a
> capability exists?
>
> This is in a corporate environment, so I can spend more than one would
> for a home installation. For instance I could by a projection system
if
> that's the answer. I haven't yet found a scaler that goes that big a
> screen size.
>
> Thanks for any interest.

I don't quite understand what you want to do here. Do you want your
computer to display on a 1080i TV device? I've done that already here
and can put a 1920x1080 signal on my HDTV from the computer (don't do it
often, but throw a switch or two and it's there).

Or are you trying to display an HDTV source of some sort on a computer
monitor? That's a bit tougher, unless you can get the source to put out
a proper firewire signal or directly decode off the air HDTV signals.

I've not seen anything that would convert component video HDTV to any
kind of VGA, though.

--
Dave Oldridge+
ICQ 1800667
Related resources
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 17, 2005 4:30:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Fri, 16 Sep 2005 20:25:20 -0400 Hash@example.org wrote:

| I've been waiting for entrepreneurship to provide a way to get a
| 1920x1200x60 PC monitor onto an HDTV. Can anybody tell me if such a
| capability exists?

Do you already have a 1920x1200x60 PC monitor?

Or are you shopping around for one with the antipation of using it for
both PC and HDTV?

Is that HDTV through the PC, or directly to the monitor?


| This is in a corporate environment, so I can spend more than one would
| for a home installation. For instance I could by a projection system if
| that's the answer. I haven't yet found a scaler that goes that big a
| screen size.

If money is no concern, you can go with real-pro broadcast gear, a lot
of which has both PC video and non-PC video inputs.

Many high end consumer monitors are in the 1920x1200 range or above with
both DVI and VGA type connections. Do you want CRT? LCD? I guess you
have not decided, yet.

What physical screen size do you need?

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Phil Howard KA9WGN | http://linuxhomepage.com/ http://ham.org/ |
| (first name) at ipal.net | http://phil.ipal.org/ http://ka9wgn.ham.org/ |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 17, 2005 7:17:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <MPG.1d953453e0d352f5989fc1@news.nabs.net>,
Jeff Rife <wevsr@nabs.net> wrote:

> (Hash@example.org) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
> > I've been waiting for entrepreneurship to provide a way to get a
> > 1920x1200x60 PC monitor onto an HDTV. Can anybody tell me if such a
> > capability exists?
>
> If you can live with 1920x1080, there are quite a few very large (45-60")
> fixed pixel displays (LCD, DLP, LCoS) that you can just plug a PC into
> (either VGA or DVI).
>
> If you must have 1920x1200, about 30" is the biggest PC monitor that
> has that many pixels.

Jeff -

Nope, constrained by contract specification to 1920x1200 real estate on
the PC. I want that, or a facsimile of that, as parallel output to an
HDTV. This is currently a 60" Zenith.

It's not the monitor that's the problem. The problem seems to be that
computer monitors make good HDTV's. HDTV's don't make good computer
monitors.

....best, Hash
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 17, 2005 7:20:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <Xns96D3B99F6F149doldridgsprintca@24.71.223.159>,
Dave Oldridge <doldridg@leavethisoutshaw.ca> wrote:

> Hash@example.org wrote in news:QnJWe.24279$8q.23961@lakeread01:
>
> > Gang -
> >
> > I've been waiting for entrepreneurship to provide a way to get a
> > 1920x1200x60 PC monitor onto an HDTV. Can anybody tell me if such a
> > capability exists?
> >
> > This is in a corporate environment, so I can spend more than one would
> > for a home installation. For instance I could by a projection system
> if
> > that's the answer. I haven't yet found a scaler that goes that big a
> > screen size.
> >
> > Thanks for any interest.
>
> I don't quite understand what you want to do here. Do you want your
> computer to display on a 1080i TV device? I've done that already here
> and can put a 1920x1080 signal on my HDTV from the computer (don't do it
> often, but throw a switch or two and it's there).
>
> Or are you trying to display an HDTV source of some sort on a computer
> monitor? That's a bit tougher, unless you can get the source to put out
> a proper firewire signal or directly decode off the air HDTV signals.
>
> I've not seen anything that would convert component video HDTV to any
> kind of VGA, though.

Dave -

The former, but I don't want 1920x1080, I want 1920x1200, from the PC
onto an HDTV. Easy to do if I could pick and choose PC resolutions I
admit. I'm not allowed to.

....best, Hash
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 17, 2005 7:28:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <dgh29042nlt@news1.newsguy.com>, phil-news-nospam@ipal.net
wrote:

> On Fri, 16 Sep 2005 20:25:20 -0400 Hash@example.org wrote:
>
> | I've been waiting for entrepreneurship to provide a way to get a
> | 1920x1200x60 PC monitor onto an HDTV. Can anybody tell me if such a
> | capability exists?
>
> Do you already have a 1920x1200x60 PC monitor?
>
> Or are you shopping around for one with the antipation of using it for
> both PC and HDTV?
>
> Is that HDTV through the PC, or directly to the monitor?
>
>
> | This is in a corporate environment, so I can spend more than one would
> | for a home installation. For instance I could by a projection system if
> | that's the answer. I haven't yet found a scaler that goes that big a
> | screen size.
>
> If money is no concern, you can go with real-pro broadcast gear, a lot
> of which has both PC video and non-PC video inputs.
>
> Many high end consumer monitors are in the 1920x1200 range or above with
> both DVI and VGA type connections. Do you want CRT? LCD? I guess you
> have not decided, yet.
>
> What physical screen size do you need?

Phil -

I have the Monitor (22 of them in fact). That isn't the problem. I
want to put the monitor's glass (1920x1200) into an HDTV in parallel
output from the workstation. I can't (as in "not allowed to") down-rez
the monitor. I can scale the HDTV input if I can find a way to do it.

....best, Hash
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 17, 2005 8:29:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

(Hash@example.org) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
> Nope, constrained by contract specification to 1920x1200 real estate on
> the PC. I want that, or a facsimile of that, as parallel output to an
> HDTV. This is currently a 60" Zenith.

I think you're gonna be stuck for a while, then, because everything larger
than 30" is going to be an "HDTV" and only handle 1920x1080. When somebody
decides that 3840x2160 can sell at 60", then you'll be in luck.

> HDTV's don't make good computer
> monitors.

Yep. The fixed-pixel displays work well as monitors because they pretty much
are. :) 

--
Jeff Rife | "She just dropped by to remind me that my life
| is an endless purgatory, interrupted by profound
| moments of misery."
| -- Richard Karinsky, "Caroline in the City"
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 17, 2005 9:42:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Ive go my Pc hooked up to my 86cm Toshibia Crt HD tv via componet. And
i view HD via a Tuner card.

I only watch the HD channels and SD it Poo Poo.

I have a Din out on my videocard. Which i asume you need as Svideo
can't do HD. Or you can use Vga or DVi out but your Tv would need to
have these for it to work. My onlyoption was componet as thats all i
had.

But it works GREAT. I record my shows to my HD and watch them later.
Ive setup all my divx movies and play them via a program called
meedio. has a remote and all FF/RW ect the works :0

Life is good.



On Sat, 17 Sep 2005 01:14:56 GMT, Dave Oldridge
<doldridg@leavethisoutshaw.ca> wrote:

>Hash@example.org wrote in news:QnJWe.24279$8q.23961@lakeread01:
>
>> Gang -
>>
>> I've been waiting for entrepreneurship to provide a way to get a
>> 1920x1200x60 PC monitor onto an HDTV. Can anybody tell me if such a
>> capability exists?
>>
>> This is in a corporate environment, so I can spend more than one would
>> for a home installation. For instance I could by a projection system
>if
>> that's the answer. I haven't yet found a scaler that goes that big a
>> screen size.
>>
>> Thanks for any interest.
>
>I don't quite understand what you want to do here. Do you want your
>computer to display on a 1080i TV device? I've done that already here
>and can put a 1920x1080 signal on my HDTV from the computer (don't do it
>often, but throw a switch or two and it's there).
>
>Or are you trying to display an HDTV source of some sort on a computer
>monitor? That's a bit tougher, unless you can get the source to put out
>a proper firewire signal or directly decode off the air HDTV signals.
>
>I've not seen anything that would convert component video HDTV to any
>kind of VGA, though.
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 18, 2005 4:48:29 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Sat, 17 Sep 2005 15:28:40 -0400 Hash@example.org wrote:

| I have the Monitor (22 of them in fact). That isn't the problem. I
| want to put the monitor's glass (1920x1200) into an HDTV in parallel
| output from the workstation. I can't (as in "not allowed to") down-rez
| the monitor. I can scale the HDTV input if I can find a way to do it.

Since you have the monitor(s), surely you can identify the model.

There has to be a reason for "not allowed to" down-rez the monitor (which
I take to mean you are being told to run the monitor at 1920x1200 and not
at 1920x1080 which I would think any 1920x1200 monitor could do). But is
it because some boss is just deciding to make life hard on you?

I don't know what you mean by "parallel output from the workstation". Is
that 2 monitors in parallel (one fed from the workstation and one fed from
the HDTV signal), or are you trying to somehow mix the two videos?

Computer monitors are very flexible devices. The CRT ones are especially.
If your monitors actually can be run at 1920x1080, it make little or no
sense to not do so. If in your case, you actually have such a reason,
then you'd be in an extreme minority trying to do something no one else
would ever need to do (I know the feeling, I've been in such situations
myself a few times). However, an HD video capture card and appropriate
software on a computer equipped with a good video card could up scale the
1920x1080 video in to 1920x1200.

I'm curious ... what is the aspect ratio of that 1920x1200? Is it 16:10,
or is it forced into 4:3 or 16:9 with non-square pixels?

I'm looking at a possible buy of a 1920x1440 CRT monitor with the hope of
being able to use it on HDTV video at times (between routine computer use).
It's a 4:3 display. But these monitors can readily reduce scanning size,
so there should be no problem letterboxing the 1920x1080 inside 1920x1440
and getting the correct aspect ratio.

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Phil Howard KA9WGN | http://linuxhomepage.com/ http://ham.org/ |
| (first name) at ipal.net | http://phil.ipal.org/ http://ka9wgn.ham.org/ |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 18, 2005 6:26:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <dgidgt01a75@news3.newsguy.com>, phil-news-nospam@ipal.net
wrote:

> On Sat, 17 Sep 2005 15:28:40 -0400 Hash@example.org wrote:
>
> | I have the Monitor (22 of them in fact). That isn't the problem. I
> | want to put the monitor's glass (1920x1200) into an HDTV in parallel
> | output from the workstation. I can't (as in "not allowed to") down-rez
> | the monitor. I can scale the HDTV input if I can find a way to do it.
>
> Since you have the monitor(s), surely you can identify the model.
>
> There has to be a reason for "not allowed to" down-rez the monitor (which
> I take to mean you are being told to run the monitor at 1920x1200 and not
> at 1920x1080 which I would think any 1920x1200 monitor could do). But is
> it because some boss is just deciding to make life hard on you?
>
> I don't know what you mean by "parallel output from the workstation". Is
> that 2 monitors in parallel (one fed from the workstation and one fed from
> the HDTV signal), or are you trying to somehow mix the two videos?
>
> Computer monitors are very flexible devices. The CRT ones are especially.
> If your monitors actually can be run at 1920x1080, it make little or no
> sense to not do so. If in your case, you actually have such a reason,
> then you'd be in an extreme minority trying to do something no one else
> would ever need to do (I know the feeling, I've been in such situations
> myself a few times). However, an HD video capture card and appropriate
> software on a computer equipped with a good video card could up scale the
> 1920x1080 video in to 1920x1200.
>
> I'm curious ... what is the aspect ratio of that 1920x1200? Is it 16:10,
> or is it forced into 4:3 or 16:9 with non-square pixels?
>
> I'm looking at a possible buy of a 1920x1440 CRT monitor with the hope of
> being able to use it on HDTV video at times (between routine computer use).
> It's a 4:3 display. But these monitors can readily reduce scanning size,
> so there should be no problem letterboxing the 1920x1080 inside 1920x1440
> and getting the correct aspect ratio.

Phil -

It's _not_ the monitors (16:10). They're fine and not my problem. I
want workstation output to two places: 1) a monitor that must be
1920x1200 as required by specification (doable and done) and 2) to a
HDTV. ie, Wye the video-out from the workstations, same signal going
two places.

I have the video cards and cables to do this, and can do it at the wrong
resolutions. I need to do it at 1920x1200.

So to speak, I don't want HDTV on a monitor, I want the monitor at
1920x1200 on HDTV.

....best, Hash
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 18, 2005 6:28:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <MPG.1d9646acf6b44611989fc5@news.nabs.net>,
Jeff Rife <wevsr@nabs.net> wrote:

> (Hash@example.org) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
> > Nope, constrained by contract specification to 1920x1200 real estate on
> > the PC. I want that, or a facsimile of that, as parallel output to an
> > HDTV. This is currently a 60" Zenith.
>
> I think you're gonna be stuck for a while, then, because everything larger
> than 30" is going to be an "HDTV" and only handle 1920x1080. When somebody
> decides that 3840x2160 can sell at 60", then you'll be in luck.
>
> > HDTV's don't make good computer
> > monitors.
>
> Yep. The fixed-pixel displays work well as monitors because they pretty much
> are. :) 

Jeff -

Thanks. Waiting for capitalism to solve my problem ;-)

....best, Hash
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 20, 2005 3:02:21 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Sun, 18 Sep 2005 14:26:51 -0400 Hash@example.org wrote:

| Phil -
|
| It's _not_ the monitors (16:10). They're fine and not my problem. I
| want workstation output to two places: 1) a monitor that must be
| 1920x1200 as required by specification (doable and done) and 2) to a
| HDTV. ie, Wye the video-out from the workstations, same signal going
| two places.
|
| I have the video cards and cables to do this, and can do it at the wrong
| resolutions. I need to do it at 1920x1200.
|
| So to speak, I don't want HDTV on a monitor, I want the monitor at
| 1920x1200 on HDTV.

Let me see if I understand what you are asking. You want to take an HDTV
set designed for 1920x1080 and run it with 1920x1200 output from a computer?

If my assumption is correct, I can say you may be finding blood from your
forehead on the brick wall. Computer monitors do tend to be very wide in
ability to adapt to different scanning rates. An HDTV set designed to be
used by a computer may have some or all of this ability, but others may
not. So I guess your need is to find someone who knows which HDTV sets
can do 1920x1200 when attached to a computer. On your own you may find
one by checking to see if it has VGA input. That connection is likely
(but even so, not 100% certain) to be there for computer input. However,
it could be rescaling that video up ... or down as the case may be ... to
the 1920x1080 it operates at. These are the things you will need to check
when you make your selections, depending on just what aspects you actually
need (if downscaling 1920x1200 to 1920x1080 is acceptable to you for this
application, then you may have a wider range of HDTV sets to choose from).

If it were me, I'd rather have a computer display monitor that runs right
at 1920x1080 (and can do so both interlaced and progressive) and then
configure my computer video for exactly 1920x1080p with the 16:9 aspect
ratio. Unfortunately, there isn't anything in the size I want right now.
So I'll have to settle for a 1920x1440 CRT monitor and letterbox HD video
either by some rescaler, or more likely, by vertical scanning size tweaks.
Of course, my needs are not the same as your needs.

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Phil Howard KA9WGN | http://linuxhomepage.com/ http://ham.org/ |
| (first name) at ipal.net | http://phil.ipal.org/ http://ka9wgn.ham.org/ |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
!