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Should XP scandisk?

Last response: in Windows XP
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November 3, 2010 11:52:19 AM

It may seem like a stupid question, but I don't know a lot about XP.

This machine has never done a scandisk after a hard reset or even a power cut. Is it supposed to, or is the NTFS just that much more robust?

Thanks.

More about : scandisk

November 3, 2010 12:29:25 PM

Xp doesn't have the scandisk program.
you can disk check by dbl clicking My computer, right click the disk and select properties, next go to tools tab and select check now.
November 6, 2010 12:28:43 PM

mhelm1 said:
Xp doesn't have the scandisk program.
you can disk check by dbl clicking My computer, right click the disk and select properties, next go to tools tab and select check now.


Oh, okay then, "Check disk" :p 

Is "checkdisk" wildy different from scandisk? As you said, it seems near identical in terms of execution and function. Should XP checkdisk after a hard reboot?

Also, having manually run a scan (as you described) it simply says it is complete and gives me no information. It doesn't open a log file and I can't find one on the HDD. I've heard it's supposed to put the information in the Event Log, but I can't find anything there either.

Thanks.
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November 12, 2010 9:48:24 PM

Any help?

Also, if I try to run it to fix errors it won't run. It says it can't run and must run on restart, but then never does. I have tried setting it in safe mode, with the /X switch and then booting into safe mode via the boot.ini, but even then it does nothing.
November 15, 2010 11:01:06 PM

I'm sure "bumping" is frowned upon, but can no-one help? Has anyone else experienced this?

Or is there somewhere else I should be asking for help?
November 16, 2010 3:06:13 AM



There are some hardware devices that are set to load at the kernel initialization stage. This "locks" the boot drive, and causes chkdsk /f and any other program that requires exclusive access to the drive to fail as part of the BootExecute entry in the system registry.

You can manually set the dirty bit and reboot. Autochk should invoke chkdsk as a result. If chkdsk does start at reboot, allow it to run. Check status of the dirty bit after Windows is running again.

Set dirty bit: Start>run>cmd>fsutil dirty

After Windows is running again, check dirty bit status: Start>run>cmd>fsutil dirty query C׃

The dirty bit is a byte on the physical disk that is stored in the $volume metadata file in the MFT. There is no way to manually clear the dirty bit after it has been set from an unclean shutdown and prevent Autochk from running, other than to run Chkdsk in repair mode (chkdsk /f).





November 20, 2010 11:20:48 AM

I don't think I understood your reply, Tigsounds.

tigsounds said:
There are some hardware devices that are set to load at the kernel initialization stage. This "locks" the boot drive, and causes chkdsk /f and any other program that requires exclusive access to the drive to fail as part of the BootExecute entry in the system registry.
How do I find out if my hardware is doing this? This is a very basic machine, it doesn't have any special hardware in it. Would it still do this in safe mode, and with the /X switch? How do I get around this?


Quote:
You can manually set the dirty bit and reboot. Autochk should invoke chkdsk as a result. If chkdsk does start at reboot, allow it to run. Check status of the dirty bit after Windows is running again.
I have done this as you suggested, but obviously, checkdisk hasn't run (because it won't) and the dirty bit remains in place. What does this tell me?

Thanks for trying to help.
November 20, 2010 1:55:20 PM

It's pretty easy to run the chkdsk manually. Start-->run-->chkdsk /r-->this will schedule the chkdsk for the next time you restart.
November 20, 2010 4:44:02 PM



If you have the XP CD, boot computer with it. Choose to repair using the recovery console.
Choose installation #1, enter password if one exist.
At the blinking prompt, enter Chkdsk /f.
December 3, 2010 5:28:23 PM

Thankyou Tigsounds, I managed to get a scandisk done this way and it did find and fix some errors.

Unfortunately, it hasn't fixed the underlying problem of being unable to scandisk from within Windows (i.e. w/o having to go and dig out the Installation disk).
December 4, 2010 4:10:35 PM

You can't run chkdsk from within the OS on the boot drive because the drive is locked. You can schedule a disk check to happen the next time you boot the computer, but that's it. You can also scan any other drive attached to the system from within Windows... but you cannot scan your boot/system drive. This isn't a problem, it's by design.
December 8, 2010 9:49:20 AM

Well, a few days (and several boots) after the chkdsk, automatically did a chkdsk at startup, and since then, I have been able to run tham at will.

I told it to do a thorough scan and it ran, but only took an hour and said everything was fine. Could it really have done a surface scan in that time?

Thanks.
December 8, 2010 11:54:01 AM

Chkdsk times can vary a lot from computer to computer. It is possible that it did a full check in an hour. Did you run it with the /r option?
December 12, 2010 5:18:49 AM

Chkdsk will check the file system first, then scan the free space for errors... it is not a "surface scan" as such... but it does still check to make sure all areas of the disk are not damaged.
!