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Noob question: HDTV and AV Recievers

Last response: in Home Theatre
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Anonymous
September 21, 2005 6:08:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Please excuse the fact that I'm completely new to HDTV - I was hoping
that someone could shed some light on how a AV Receiver will work with
a HD set that I'm planning on purchasing. In a nutshell, here's my
delimma: I'm going to do a wall mount installation and I'm going to
bury the wires for the TV in the wall. I don't want to go through the
trouble of burying wires only to add another component to my home
theater setup and have to snake wires out in the open. What I was
hoping was, that by shelling out a little more money for a decent A/V
Receiver, any components that I have or want to add will plug into the
reciever instead of the TV so I'll have less wires to hide. Given
that information:

How do I know if a reciever will be able to handle HD signals from my
cable box?

What type of inputs and outputs should I need in my reciever and what
cables will I need to connect the receiver to the TV?

Thanks in advance
Anonymous
September 21, 2005 6:08:06 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On 21 Sep 2005 14:08:05 -0700, spilich@gmail.com wrote:

>Please excuse the fact that I'm completely new to HDTV - I was hoping
>that someone could shed some light on how a AV Receiver will work with
>a HD set that I'm planning on purchasing. In a nutshell, here's my
>delimma: I'm going to do a wall mount installation and I'm going to
>bury the wires for the TV in the wall. I don't want to go through the
>trouble of burying wires only to add another component to my home
>theater setup and have to snake wires out in the open. What I was
>hoping was, that by shelling out a little more money for a decent A/V
>Receiver, any components that I have or want to add will plug into the
>reciever instead of the TV so I'll have less wires to hide. Given
>that information:
>
>How do I know if a reciever will be able to handle HD signals from my
>cable box?
>
>What type of inputs and outputs should I need in my reciever and what
>cables will I need to connect the receiver to the TV?
>
>Thanks in advance

My wish list would include a receiver with at least two hdmi inputs
and one output to your HDTV. Use 2" dia conduit in the wall.
I used PVC from Home Depot. I would like to have had better access
to the rear of all that stuff that gets hooked up. If I had a closet
on a rear wall I would have busted thru and made hookups there.
I would have liked to keep the wire runs shorter by putting the
receiver, dvdplayer, cable box and vcr closer to the hdtv.
Anonymous
September 21, 2005 9:26:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

spilich@gmail.com wrote:
> Please excuse the fact that I'm completely new to HDTV - I was hoping
> that someone could shed some light on how a AV Receiver will work with
> a HD set that I'm planning on purchasing. In a nutshell, here's my
> delimma: I'm going to do a wall mount installation and I'm going to
> bury the wires for the TV in the wall. I don't want to go through the
> trouble of burying wires only to add another component to my home
> theater setup and have to snake wires out in the open. What I was
> hoping was, that by shelling out a little more money for a decent A/V
> Receiver, any components that I have or want to add will plug into the
> reciever instead of the TV so I'll have less wires to hide. Given
> that information:
>
> How do I know if a reciever will be able to handle HD signals from my
> cable box?
>
> What type of inputs and outputs should I need in my reciever and what
> cables will I need to connect the receiver to the TV?


Here's one companies thinking on that subject:

<http://www.press.ce.philips.com/apps/c_dir/e3379701.nsf...$File/Backgrounder_HDMI.pdf>

--
Matthew

"All you need to start an asylum is an empty room and the right kind of
people" -- Alexander Bullock ("My Man Godfrey" 1936)
Related resources
Anonymous
September 21, 2005 9:36:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

spilich@gmail.com wrote:

> Please excuse the fact that I'm completely new to HDTV - I was hoping
> that someone could shed some light on how a AV Receiver will work with
> a HD set that I'm planning on purchasing. In a nutshell, here's my
> delimma: I'm going to do a wall mount installation and I'm going to
> bury the wires for the TV in the wall. I don't want to go through the
> trouble of burying wires only to add another component to my home
> theater setup and have to snake wires out in the open. What I was
> hoping was, that by shelling out a little more money for a decent A/V
> Receiver, any components that I have or want to add will plug into the
> reciever instead of the TV so I'll have less wires to hide. Given
> that information:
>
> How do I know if a reciever will be able to handle HD signals from my
> cable box?
>
> What type of inputs and outputs should I need in my reciever and what
> cables will I need to connect the receiver to the TV?
>
> Thanks in advance

First, if you want to run wires through a wall, I would suggest you
consider running an open conduit so you can swap wiring as needed.

Your cable company HD set top boxes should (as far I know, they all
do) come with a digital audio output, ideally both a coaxial and an
optical port. You connect that digital audio line to the receiver,
confirm that both boxes are set up correctly, and you should be set for
5.1 sound. The cable STB will also have stereo audio RCA connectors, so
you can use those too.

For the video connections, odds are your receiver will only support
component cables. Receivers with HDMI ports are still few and currently
found only in the very high end receivers.

Alan F
Anonymous
September 21, 2005 11:27:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Thanks for the input: As for the open conduit, there's not much room:
The wall where the TV is going is sheetrock over brick, so all I can
really do is cut a strip in the sheetrock, run wires and plaster over
them. This means I won't be able to swap out wires: That's one of the
main reasons why I think the reciever is a good Idea: If I want to
add a component to my home theather, it plugs into the reciever.
Question: If my reciever doesn't have HDMI outputs, I'm assuming I'll
need a coax, optical, and RCA connections running from the reciever to
the TV. Will I notice the difference in the picture if I don't have
HDMI going to the TV? Will the picture still be in HD level quality?

Thanks
Anonymous
September 22, 2005 2:05:25 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

spilich@gmail.com wrote:
>
> Thanks for the input: As for the open conduit, there's not much room:
> The wall where the TV is going is sheetrock over brick, so all I can
> really do is cut a strip in the sheetrock, run wires and plaster over
> them. This means I won't be able to swap out wires: That's one of the
> main reasons why I think the reciever is a good Idea: If I want to
> add a component to my home theather, it plugs into the reciever.
> Question: If my reciever doesn't have HDMI outputs, I'm assuming I'll
> need a coax, optical, and RCA connections running from the reciever to
> the TV. Will I notice the difference in the picture if I don't have
> HDMI going to the TV? Will the picture still be in HD level quality?
>
> Thanks

Your HDTV wiring issue is more complex than you may think....

unless all your Audio/Video equipment supports HDMI, both ins &
outs..

If you look at most modern 'hook-ups', HDMI is 'boss',

DVI for video only, & lower component cables all allow HD video.

Picture in Picture needs either a S-Video or RF cable.....

Your internal HDTV tuner may need a co-ax or Optical

Digital audio out... DVD players, games, & VHS tape

players require different Ports with most all modern

HDTV units have placed at the rear.... or sides....

I wish A/V cabling was real simple too, it could be

if you map out your AV purchases with a higher end

equipment ' AV receiver/'switcher''.... And plan a lot..

You may want to put a 'pipe' in the wall rather than a groove...
Anonymous
September 22, 2005 2:37:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

spilich@gmail.com wrote:
> Question: If my reciever doesn't have HDMI outputs, I'm assuming I'll
> need a coax, optical, and RCA connections running from the reciever to
> the TV. Will I notice the difference in the picture if I don't have
> HDMI going to the TV? Will the picture still be in HD level quality?
>
> Thanks

Spilich,
Why don't you just reconsider your choice of TV? You can buy flat
panels now that operate as two seperate pieces. There's the screen(with
or without speakers attached)to hang on your wall. It hooks up with an
HDMI or other proprietary cable to the media box. The media box is an
outboard processor that you put with your other equipment. The box
changes the channels, does the picture-in-picture, and has all the
input and output jacks(component, composite, s-video, audio, etc.)on
the back. It sends everything through the one connecting cable, to the
screen. It even sends remote control signals back the other way. These
types of screens are usually thinner, to boot! How about it?
September 22, 2005 10:45:41 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

spilich@gmail.com wrote:
> Thanks for the input: As for the open conduit, there's not much room:
> The wall where the TV is going is sheetrock over brick, so all I can
> really do is cut a strip in the sheetrock, run wires and plaster over
> them. This means I won't be able to swap out wires: That's one of the
> main reasons why I think the reciever is a good Idea: If I want to
> add a component to my home theather, it plugs into the reciever.
> Question: If my reciever doesn't have HDMI outputs, I'm assuming I'll
> need a coax, optical, and RCA connections running from the reciever to
> the TV. Will I notice the difference in the picture if I don't have
> HDMI going to the TV? Will the picture still be in HD level quality?

Might I suggest an alternative....you are definitely going to need to
fiddle with the wiring at some point. If you can't bury it nicely
inside the wall, you might want to get some of that surface mount metal
(flat box type) conduit that people often use to run electrical work
along baseboards. That way, you can just pop the top off it when you
need access and you can paint it the same colour as the wall.

If you're running a home theater setup, your TV's speakers shouldn't be
doing anything so you'll only need to get a video connection to it. In
order to get minimal quality for HD content, you're going to have use AT
LEAST component cabling. My preference is for DVI or HDMI to avoid an
extra D/A-->A/D step which can result in quality loss.

As for Home theater processors/switchers, I've been very happy with this
one:

http://www.outlawaudio.com/products/990.html

I'm a big fan of the DVI switching ability (my Aquos LCD supports DVI
and HDMI). If your screen only does HDMI, there are cheap DVI-->HDMI
adapters available at Radioshack or here:

http://www.outlawaudio.com/products/cab_hdmi_about.html

Good luck!
!