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Transfer RAID-0 Array?

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November 1, 2009 6:12:17 PM

Okay, so I think my 680i SLi motherboard has reached the end of its days.

I have enough vital data on RAID 0 arrays on the board to warrant suicide.. or at least listening to a Bob Marley album.

I have heard that it is possible to transfer a RAID 0 array from one controller to the same, on a different motherboard. Such as going from a 680i SLi motherboard to a 750i SLi.

So, is this possible? If so, how is it done? When I create a new array, it automatically asks me to erase the data on the two drives, correct?

Thank You!

More about : transfer raid array

November 1, 2009 10:12:09 PM

you don't have to create a new array, all you have to do is to plug in the array and enable RAID in BIOS. The controller will look for the RAID data on the drive and configure itself.
November 2, 2009 3:57:42 AM

And you're sure this will work?

With what chipsets?!
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a b V Motherboard
a c 127 G Storage
November 2, 2009 4:00:36 AM

Quote:
I have enough vital data on RAID 0 arrays on the board to warrant suicide..

If that's the case, no other option exists than buying new disks and transferring the data there so you have at least 2 valid copies of your "vital" data.

Any other option would always have the risk of something going wrong, and having crucial data without any backup or redundancy is a big no-no to begin with.
November 2, 2009 4:12:30 AM

sub mesa said:
Quote:
I have enough vital data on RAID 0 arrays on the board to warrant suicide..

If that's the case, no other option exists than buying new disks and transferring the data there so you have at least 2 valid copies of your "vital" data.

Any other option would always have the risk of something going wrong, and having crucial data without any backup or redundancy is a big no-no to begin with.


Um.. how exactly am I supposed to back up my data without a motherboard?

I just need to know what is the cheapest board I can buy that will sustain my RAID 0 arrays. What is it - 610i, 630i.. maybe even nForce 4?!
a b V Motherboard
a c 127 G Storage
November 2, 2009 4:19:48 AM

You can do two things:

- buy a motherboard of the same chipset so you can migrate your existing RAID without any form of backup (dangerous)
- recover your RAID using read-only techniques and put it on new harddrives (safe)

The second option would work with any chipset, preferably those who do not support RAID, using any Linux or BSD system. For example, Ubuntu Linux would recognise your nVidia MediaShield soft-RAID array and apply its own RAID engine. This would allow you to copy all the data to new/other HDDs which you can access in Windows again. This operation is safe because it does not write a single byte to your existing disks with all the valuable data on it, so its a non-destructive procedure.

In either case, be very careful what you do. Its not that hard to screw things up and lose all your data in just one mouse click - especially on Windows when it prompts you to "initialize" the disks.
November 2, 2009 4:33:55 AM

sub mesa said:
You can do two things:

- buy a motherboard of the same chipset so you can migrate your existing RAID without any form of backup (dangerous)
- recover your RAID using read-only techniques and put it on new harddrives (safe)

The second option would work with any chipset, preferably those who do not support RAID, using any Linux or BSD system. For example, Ubuntu Linux would recognise your nVidia MediaShield soft-RAID array and apply its own RAID engine. This would allow you to copy all the data to new/other HDDs which you can access in Windows again. This operation is safe because it does not write a single byte to your existing disks with all the valuable data on it, so its a non-destructive procedure.

In either case, be very careful what you do. Its not that hard to screw things up and lose all your data in just one mouse click - especially on Windows when it prompts you to "initialize" the disks.


So you're saying I can install Linux and somehow the magical powers of Linux will get me my data back?

If so, let me just TRY to use a different board, as if it doesn't work, the procedure is completely reversible. Just tell me which to use.. then explain to me how Linux works, as I've never used it before. Also, what do you think of Raid 2 Raid?
a b V Motherboard
a c 127 G Storage
November 2, 2009 4:53:17 AM

Magical powers indeed!

RAID can be called a specification. The reason RAID arrays can't just be 'migrated' between different controllers is because each controller use its own configuration format, this configuration contains:
- stripe size
- disk order
- offset
- raid level

With these 4 basic settings, any RAID is accessible. That's exactly what Linux and BSD Software RAID does: it reads the "metadata format" so it knows the 4 basic settings your RAID is created with, and applies its own RAID engine. This works. :) 

In fact, this RAID configuration is just 512 bytes of data - 1 sector that is located on each disk that is a member of a RAID array, and is located at the very end of each disk - the last sector. By reading that sector, it knows all it needs to know to access your RAID array.

So in fact all RAIDs are compatible as long as you can read the "format" of this metadata configuration sector. Linux knows all popular formats: Intel, nVidia, Promise, Silicon Image, JMicron, Adaptec and others.

To try this, simply:
1) download and burn Ubuntu 9.10
2) insert CD in drive and boot from the CD
3) Go to System -> Administration -> Synaptic Package Manager and install the "mdadm" package - this is the software RAID configuration utility you need
4) open a terminal and execute:
sudo mdadm --detail /dev/md0

This should list information about your RAID array. If this works, it means Linux has already configured your RAID array and you can use it to read data from. The next step would be mounting and copying the data to another disk, preferably a single large disk that can hold all data currently on the RAID.

I would guide you to this process if you like. Try the 4 steps above and paste the output here and i'll give further instructions to help you recover your data.

Cheers. :) 
November 2, 2009 5:09:21 AM

sub mesa said:
Magical powers indeed!

RAID can be called a specification. The reason RAID arrays can't just be 'migrated' between different controllers is because each controller use its own configuration format, this configuration contains:
- stripe size
- disk order
- offset
- raid level

With these 4 basic settings, any RAID is accessible. That's exactly what Linux and BSD Software RAID does: it reads the "metadata format" so it knows the 4 basic settings your RAID is created with, and applies its own RAID engine. This works. :) 

In fact, this RAID configuration is just 512 bytes of data - 1 sector that is located on each disk that is a member of a RAID array, and is located at the very end of each disk - the last sector. By reading that sector, it knows all it needs to know to access your RAID array.

So in fact all RAIDs are compatible as long as you can read the "format" of this metadata configuration sector. Linux knows all popular formats: Intel, nVidia, Promise, Silicon Image, JMicron, Adaptec and others.

To try this, simply:
1) download and burn Ubuntu 9.10
2) insert CD in drive and boot from the CD
3) Go to System -> Administration -> Synaptic Package Manager and install the "mdadm" package - this is the software RAID configuration utility you need
4) open a terminal and execute:
sudo mdadm --detail /dev/md0

This should list information about your RAID array. If this works, it means Linux has already configured your RAID array and you can use it to read data from. The next step would be mounting and copying the data to another disk, preferably a single large disk that can hold all data currently on the RAID.

I would guide you to this process if you like. Try the 4 steps above and paste the output here and i'll give further instructions to help you recover your data.

Cheers. :) 


That would be nice, but unless Linux can run without a motherboard, I'm going to have to buy another. Now, if you can assure me that a P35 board will work just fine with the Linux method, that would be an option. But as it seems, wouldn't it be twice as safe to try this on an nVidia chipset? In which case, which ONE?
a b V Motherboard
a c 127 G Storage
November 2, 2009 5:18:38 AM

Any motherboard with plain SATA ports with RAID mode disabled can use the procedure i posted above. Be sure to disable RAID support in the BIOS; you will be using Software RAID instead. Do not boot windows while having the drives connected and RAID support disabled. At least not until you have your data safely backupped on a separate disk.
November 2, 2009 5:32:36 AM

sub mesa said:
Any motherboard with plain SATA ports with RAID mode disabled can use the procedure i posted above. Be sure to disable RAID support in the BIOS; you will be using Software RAID instead. Do not boot windows while having the drives connected and RAID support disabled. At least not until you have your data safely backupped on a separate disk.


Okay, okay. But that's the back-up plan. I want to try an nVidia chipset first.
I see that 610i/630i do support Wolfdale, but I doubt they overclock well.
a b V Motherboard
a c 127 G Storage
November 2, 2009 7:00:42 AM

Good luck, but as i said this is the dangerous route. If you do something wrong, you might lose all data.
November 2, 2009 7:54:51 AM

sub mesa said:
Good luck, but as i said this is the dangerous route. If you do something wrong, you might lose all data.


I found a cheap 630i board. Going out to buy it. Will post results.
a b V Motherboard
a b G Storage
November 2, 2009 11:58:01 AM

If you get it up and running, might I suggest you save all your data to a single external drive somewhere? Then you don't have to worry about this next time.
If you want to run RAID 0, you MUST have a good backup in place.
November 2, 2009 6:21:59 PM

jitpublisher said:
If you get it up and running, might I suggest you save all your data to a single external drive somewhere? Then you don't have to worry about this next time.
If you want to run RAID 0, you MUST have a good backup in place.


That's the plan. I bought a 1.5TB external drive. I will transfer the files onto that and then move the RAID-0 array to my new motherboard, one by one and two in all. Then, I'll only be upgrading to X58 (from P45), so I won't have to worry about losing my data again. Besides, by then there will be 4TB-5TB drives and 2TB drives will be cheap.
November 10, 2009 11:34:04 AM

How did you get on?

After a google search i cant belive im in the same position, Im running XFX 680i LT with a Raid0 and put my motherboard down to fault not touched it for a few weeks i would like to try enabling the raid0 drives in a XFX 750i SLI mobo and hopefully the new board will see the raid array.
December 26, 2009 7:23:31 AM

Thanks for this. I'm having a similar problem only mine is not motherboard related. I have an Iomega external hard drive and the power supply is only putting out 11.24 volts now from the power supply itself. No voltage drop on the circuit board inside that powers the drives. They Tick when I turn the external drive on.

It just happened out of nowhere. I shut the computer down and the drive for a couple hours.... then just decided it didn't have the power to spin up the drives. I take the drives out and put them in my computer just to power up but not hook up, and they spin up fine. Computer power supply is putting out a little over 12 volts.

The Iomega external uses two seagate 500 gig hard drives ran in a raid-0 array so computer sees one external 1 TB drive. Unless I can repair the power adapter it'll be about $40 for a new one.

I've installed linux before, but am not sure if the package you mention is also available with other distro's. Time for a little research.

sub mesa said:
Magical powers indeed!

RAID can be called a specification. The reason RAID arrays can't just be 'migrated' between different controllers is because each controller use its own configuration format, this configuration contains:
- stripe size
- disk order
- offset
- raid level

With these 4 basic settings, any RAID is accessible. That's exactly what Linux and BSD Software RAID does: it reads the "metadata format" so it knows the 4 basic settings your RAID is created with, and applies its own RAID engine. This works. :) 

In fact, this RAID configuration is just 512 bytes of data - 1 sector that is located on each disk that is a member of a RAID array, and is located at the very end of each disk - the last sector. By reading that sector, it knows all it needs to know to access your RAID array.

So in fact all RAIDs are compatible as long as you can read the "format" of this metadata configuration sector. Linux knows all popular formats: Intel, nVidia, Promise, Silicon Image, JMicron, Adaptec and others.

To try this, simply:
1) download and burn Ubuntu 9.10
2) insert CD in drive and boot from the CD
3) Go to System -> Administration -> Synaptic Package Manager and install the "mdadm" package - this is the software RAID configuration utility you need
4) open a terminal and execute:
sudo mdadm --detail /dev/md0

This should list information about your RAID array. If this works, it means Linux has already configured your RAID array and you can use it to read data from. The next step would be mounting and copying the data to another disk, preferably a single large disk that can hold all data currently on the RAID.

I would guide you to this process if you like. Try the 4 steps above and paste the output here and i'll give further instructions to help you recover your data.

Cheers. :) 

January 14, 2010 4:16:45 AM

that is funny tomaso1z, my evga 680i lt board died a couple weeks ago and so i bought an asus 780i (being a complete idiot and not knowing that raid 0 are read different on each chipset), i got it running today and the raid gets up to the screen where i can choose either my xp or vista partition, when i run xp it loads up then blue screens, when i try vista it just continually loads never getting to the desktop. I haven't tried adding 780i drivers mostly because I cant get on to windows and I'm not sure how you would do it through the boot.

I've heard a few people be able to get away with going to a 680i to 780i with there raid 0 intact though they never explain how.

unless I find some new info I think I'm just going to play it safe from here, buy another hard drive and put all my info on that using sub mesas method hoping that i didn't already destroy something.
January 18, 2010 9:13:58 AM

I just wanted to add that the person that said you just enable raid in bios and the board will recognize the array is INCORRECT unless like they said you are using the exact same chipset. I just went through this 2 days ago. I knew that would be the case though so I backed up what I needed and formatted my drives when I resetup the array.

I guess that is one of the several pitfalls of raid is the inability to transfer it to any old controller like you would with a standard single sata drive. Especially when most people end up upgrading their board when it fails years down the line.
January 19, 2010 7:14:47 PM

sub mesa said:
Magical powers indeed!

RAID can be called a specification. The reason RAID arrays can't just be 'migrated' between different controllers is because each controller use its own configuration format, this configuration contains:
- stripe size
- disk order
- offset
- raid level

With these 4 basic settings, any RAID is accessible. That's exactly what Linux and BSD Software RAID does: it reads the "metadata format" so it knows the 4 basic settings your RAID is created with, and applies its own RAID engine. This works. :) 

In fact, this RAID configuration is just 512 bytes of data - 1 sector that is located on each disk that is a member of a RAID array, and is located at the very end of each disk - the last sector. By reading that sector, it knows all it needs to know to access your RAID array.

So in fact all RAIDs are compatible as long as you can read the "format" of this metadata configuration sector. Linux knows all popular formats: Intel, nVidia, Promise, Silicon Image, JMicron, Adaptec and others.

To try this, simply:
1) download and burn Ubuntu 9.10
2) insert CD in drive and boot from the CD
3) Go to System -> Administration -> Synaptic Package Manager and install the "mdadm" package - this is the software RAID configuration utility you need
4) open a terminal and execute:
sudo mdadm --detail /dev/md0

This should list information about your RAID array. If this works, it means Linux has already configured your RAID array and you can use it to read data from. The next step would be mounting and copying the data to another disk, preferably a single large disk that can hold all data currently on the RAID.

I would guide you to this process if you like. Try the 4 steps above and paste the output here and i'll give further instructions to help you recover your data.

Cheers. :) 


Hi sub mesa,

This thread might be long dead but if you read this then I came across the thread as I have the similar problem to that described in it - dead motherboard with a RAID 0 setup. I would like to try the Ubunto route to recovering the data and would welcome the further instructions you offered to provide the OP above.

Graham.
January 26, 2010 5:17:45 PM

As I got no reply from the above and after a few more hours research this is what i did to recover my data:

1. Download the Ubuntu 9.10 iso and burn it to a CD.

2. Connect the two discs to the two spare SATA ports in another machine I have which does not have a RAID controller on board - apparently a very good thing otherwise you must disable any RAID controller.

3. Boot the machine from the Ubuntu disk.

4. The disks were immediately recognised by the BIOS as two seperate 250MB disks (as you would expect) with auto detection being selected.

5. Ubuntu displayed the two disks as a single 500MB disk which I could then access and as Ubuntu also displayed the HDD in the machine I was able to simply copy the data I wanted across.

The reason this works, apparently, is that Ubuntu can read the RAID metadata in the last sector on each disk and has decoders for all the major RAID controller manufacturers metadata formats. Armed with this information it detects that the disks were part of a RAID array and then sets up a software RAID controller and thereby makes the disks available as a software RAID array to match their previous incarnation. Magic!!!!!!

I did not have to do anything with mdadm or mount the array Ubuntu just came up with it already mounted and useable straight off the boot!
a b V Motherboard
a c 127 G Storage
January 27, 2010 8:56:51 PM

Sorry for my lack of response, i don't monitor these forums that regularly anymore. Please write to me directly if you need help with something like this. My address is sub.mesa (at) the webmail provider from google (gmail).
It seems that, in your case, the 'md' or "Multiple Disk" driver was already active. You use 'mdadm' to 'interact' with the md driver; but they are two separate things.

If you would open a terminal and type "dmesg" it would show you all output of the boot process; including detecting the meta-data from your disks. You can search through it by using grep, like:

dmesg | grep sda

would show all lines containing "sda" like /dev/sda; if this is one of the harddrives of your RAID it should give some messages regarding this. Also try to grep md for any output the md driver gives. Just to confirm or learn from it; apparently you needed no additional configuration. :) 

So to clarify: you do NOT need a RAID-capable chipset/motherboard to use Ubuntu to get data off your drives. If you do have a RAID-capable chipset/motherboard, disable it. Ubuntu should see the drives as 2 normally connected drives and will use its own software RAID driver -- md.

Hope other people can use this method to recover their FakeRAID/Chipset RAID array. Note that these are all software -- the chipset itself does not do anything crucial other than making booting from RAID array possible -- the windows drivers just do all the work and the hardware just operates as "SATA controller". The same thing can ofcourse be done on Linux; and if you teach that driver to read different formats of metadata - intel, nvidia, ati, jmicron, silicon image, promise, etc. - then you can support them all. :) 
February 2, 2010 10:58:38 AM

sub mesa said:
Sorry for my lack of response, i don't monitor these forums that regularly anymore. Please write to me directly if you need help with something like this. My address is sub.mesa (at) the webmail provider from google (gmail).

[SNIP]



I tried the direct e-mail route suggested above but no reply. I sent it to your name including the dot as above @gmail.com :( 

a b V Motherboard
a c 127 G Storage
February 2, 2010 5:31:53 PM

Oops - i missed it. Look again you may have a reply. ;-)
March 11, 2010 8:43:10 PM

I was able to use this method recently to fix an issue described here:

http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/256465-14-interpret...

Once I had the data backed up I went ahead and put in one of the new hard drives Dell had shipped to me. The Intel software would not recognize it and the computer would not boot. I switched the drive and the same thing happened. I assumed I would have to rebuild from scratch. Since I figured hope was lost, I went ahead and chose to set drive 0 (the "offline member") to "non-RAID" in the Intel screen.

That switched the overall RAID status from "failed" to "degraded" and it promptly re-built on the existing drives. Back to normal! I've sinced replaced the offline drive and had a successful rebuild as well.

Thanks, sub-mesa, for the help!
a b V Motherboard
a c 127 G Storage
March 11, 2010 10:51:36 PM

Nice to hear that aamann! Great job.
March 14, 2010 7:09:36 AM

awesome! I just used this to repair my raid from my 8 year old p4t533. Piece of cake given your instructions! Thanks!!!! I was about to track down and overpay for an older board that was identical... Instead, I will be upgrading to a new computer with all of my data intact. In fact, I liked the install of Ubuntu so much that I may just stick with that for a while.
Thanks again sub mesa.
a b V Motherboard
a c 127 G Storage
March 14, 2010 1:06:14 PM

More success stories! Perhaps i should re-write the guide a bit, and let it be made sticky?

I guess the Recover-your-broken-RAID-using-Ubuntu method is not all that well known, and may help lots of other people also.
April 26, 2010 5:17:00 PM

sub mesa said:
More success stories! Perhaps i should re-write the guide a bit, and let it be made sticky?

I guess the Recover-your-broken-RAID-using-Ubuntu method is not all that well known, and may help lots of other people also.


I have loaded Ubuntu on my PC using an external USB HD. I had added the mdadm and applyed it. The 4 HD's in the raid array do not show up. I have run the
edgefog@edgefog:~$ sudo mdadm --detail /dev/md0
[sudo] password for edgefog:
mdadm: cannot open /dev/md0: No such file or directory

When I open the disk utility I can see the 4 HD's they are listed as healty and as part of a raid array. No options are available except to erase them. I attempted to use the information about the HD showing it as /dev/sdd1 and again got the same results. see below.

edgefog@edgefog:~$ sudo mdadm --detail /dev/sdd1
mdadm: /dev/sdd1 does not appear to be an md device

I have tried doing it with both the Raid option in the bios on and off and it seems to make no difference. Its seems like I'm real close to getting to the data or that there is nothing there!

The only options I have in the disk utility is to erase or create new software array.

Any advice you can give will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

April 26, 2010 11:59:37 PM

Guys i am not that tech savvy but would it be better to have a NAS drive in Raid 1 like i do to protect your data off the computer? I have a WD Sharespace with 2 x 1tb drives in raid 1 but you can max out my model at 4 x 2 tb. I think if you need more space than that you will be able to find effective models.

I like mine because i can access it from anywhere and set levels of access etc, like a mini server.

Just a quick thought, if the data is critical then its worth the extra cash to setup something like this. Less parts to minimise failures.
a b V Motherboard
a c 127 G Storage
April 27, 2010 12:13:55 AM

trenna187: this thread is about recovering "failed" RAIDs

edgefog: it appears Ubuntu's 'detect and setup onboard RAID0 automatically' did not work in your case, as you do not have a /dev/md0 device. So Ubuntu sees your physical disks; but did not automatically configure those to a virtual RAID-array you can actually use. Be careful when trying things; do not write to the disks!

You would have to post all your data here and we can try to recover your RAID, but it does look you had some damage. Could you explain to me what happened? Any relevant information may help here.
April 28, 2010 12:44:57 AM

EVGA 58X mother board
Raid 1 and raid 0
4 500 gb Seagate HD with upgraded firmware done when the array was installed 18 months ago
Intel Matrix Manager
Windows XP Pro 64
The raid was created when the OS was installed.
The OS is on the raid ( I have since learned this is not the thing to do!)

SMART event occurred. The drive was still running. I rebooted the machine. DOS screen showed "offline member for all 4 drives. PC will not boot. I removed the HD bay and tested the drives on a 2nd PC using the seagate tool. All drived passed short self test.

I have installed Ubuntu to a external USB hard drive, installed the mdadm I can see the 4 drives in disk utility. both separately and as 2 1000gb Raid drives. I did remove the raid selection from the BIOS

I have not written any thing to any of the drive or even attempted to make any repairs. I would just at this time be able to retrieve data from them.

Any suggestions?
May 3, 2010 3:11:32 PM

sub mesa said:
trenna187: this thread is about recovering "failed" RAIDs

edgefog: it appears Ubuntu's 'detect and setup onboard RAID0 automatically' did not work in your case, as you do not have a /dev/md0 device. So Ubuntu sees your physical disks; but did not automatically configure those to a virtual RAID-array you can actually use. Be careful when trying things; do not write to the disks!

You would have to post all your data here and we can try to recover your RAID, but it does look you had some damage. Could you explain to me what happened? Any relevant information may help here.


Anything else you need to know?
a b V Motherboard
a c 127 G Storage
May 4, 2010 2:08:50 PM

If you would buy a 2TB drive, you could transfer the RAID contents to a single disk and try recovery on there.

Other options may be more dangerous, such as setting up the RAID yourself. Since you are using MatrixRAID; that means each disk is serving two RAID arrays - more complicated and i'm not sure if the md driver supports that.

Do you know exactly how large the RAID1 is?

Perhaps the easiest would be to give me SSH/VNC access to the machine. That would imply that you trust me, however. The trick here is creating a read-only RAID0 array to try to access this data. The RAID1 part should be recoverable without Linux.

It is also likely one of your drives has a bad sector or anything. You can test that with:

sudo apt-get install smartmontools
then use on your drives:
sudo smartctl -a /dev/sda

(replace sda for the name of your HDDs)

Look for:
- CURRENT_PENDING_SECTOR (unfixed bad sectors - VERY DANGEROUS!)
- REALLOCATED_SECTOR_CNT (fixed bad sectors)
- UDMA_CRC_ERROR_COUNT (cabling errors)

If you want to try the SSH/VNC method, open port 22 and 5900 to the PC, install ssh by issuing "sudo apt-get install openssh-server" and VNC by configuring System -> Preferences -> Remote Desktop.

You can email me on gmail (sub<dot>mesa @ gmail<dot>com)
May 10, 2010 2:30:42 AM

h2gt2g said:
As I got no reply from the above and after a few more hours research this is what i did to recover my data:

1. Download the Ubuntu 9.10 iso and burn it to a CD.

2. Connect the two discs to the two spare SATA ports in another machine I have which does not have a RAID controller on board - apparently a very good thing otherwise you must disable any RAID controller.

3. Boot the machine from the Ubuntu disk.

4. The disks were immediately recognised by the BIOS as two seperate 250MB disks (as you would expect) with auto detection being selected.

5. Ubuntu displayed the two disks as a single 500MB disk which I could then access and as Ubuntu also displayed the HDD in the machine I was able to simply copy the data I wanted across.

The reason this works, apparently, is that Ubuntu can read the RAID metadata in the last sector on each disk and has decoders for all the major RAID controller manufacturers metadata formats. Armed with this information it detects that the disks were part of a RAID array and then sets up a software RAID controller and thereby makes the disks available as a software RAID array to match their previous incarnation. Magic!!!!!!

I did not have to do anything with mdadm or mount the array Ubuntu just came up with it already mounted and useable straight off the boot!


Thanks, booting into the Ubunto CD did the job:

I had a failed motherboard with a RAID 0 array using a VIA VT8237 chipset. I got a new GA-M68M-S2P Gigabyte motherboard. I plugged the two SATA cables into SATA2_0 and SATA2_1.

I plugged in a USB external hard drive to get the files off the RAID array.

I burned Ubuntu 10.04 to a CD. When booting, I hit DEL to go to BIOS setup. I made sure it would boot from the CD ROM. In the BIOS, under Integrated Peripherals, I set the "NV Serial-ATA Controller" to "[All Enabled]." I tried it with [Disabled], and Ubuntu could not see the two hard drives attached to the SATA connectors.

In the BIOS, I made sure I did not touch the "Serial-ATA RAID Config." It remains as "[Press Enter]."

After booting, Ubuntu loads. I chose the TRY Ubuntu vs. the INSTALL option. When Ubunto is finished setting up, The RAID array appears under the "Places" menu as DRV1_VOL1. The external USB dirve also appears. I was able to open each drive in a window and drag the files off the RAID array to the exernal USB drive.

So I also did not have to do mdadm.

Greg
May 11, 2010 10:55:31 PM

Sub Mesa, I'm shooting you an e-mail with all sorts of information suggested from above so maybe you can see what's going on.

The disk manager sees both drives, but one of them is showing as not being partitioned.
May 18, 2010 4:50:46 PM

I got my files back. I ended up having to use R-Studio in order to retrieve my files.
a b V Motherboard
a c 127 G Storage
May 18, 2010 8:24:24 PM

Grats on getting your files back javve, and sorry it didn't work out with Ubuntu.

Remember, if Ubuntu cannot automatically mount your RAID array with the following instructions, you will need manual recover. Automatic recovery should work as follows:
1. Burn and boot Ubuntu 10.04, click Try Ubuntu button when it appears
2. Click Places menu, click Home
3. In the window that opens, click "... GB Filesystem" on the left. This should let you access your data.

If this does not work, you need to recover manually. You can do that under Windows like javve did with commercial utilities. If you want a free option, you can do it with either Linux or FreeBSD; but a bit more complicated.

I probably write a guide on that at some point. Until that time, please continue to email me for any requests. I will likely ask you to install FreeBSD according to my guides and open SSH access. That way i can safely recover RAIDs without writing a byte to the disks.
June 8, 2010 5:32:32 AM

Guide and sticky!
June 14, 2011 5:55:24 AM

My motherboard failed, and now I am trying to recover my data from the RAID0 configuration that I had that consisted of 2 500GB SATA hard drives. It was configured using the on-board RAID controller (AMD, SB700) on a Gigabyte MB. I was running Windows 7, and the RAID0 array was formatted as 3 NTFS partitions (OS, Apps, Data).

I took the 2 HDs and installed them in a different computer (with RAID disabled), and booted Ubuntu-Live. From some discussions, I read I was hoping that Ubuntu would automatically recognize the RAID, however I didn't have this luck. The two hard drives show up in the Disk Utility application as Healthy and I've attached the screen shots for further analysis.

Also, I tried to manually use mdadm to detect the array, but no luck there. Here's the log from that:

ubuntu@ubuntu:/$ sudo mdadm --assemble --scan
mdadm: No arrays found in config file or automatically
ubuntu@ubuntu:/$ sudo mdadm --examine /dev/sda
mdadm: No md superblock detected on /dev/sda.
ubuntu@ubuntu:/$ sudo mdadm --examine /dev/sda1
mdadm: No md superblock detected on /dev/sda1.
ubuntu@ubuntu:/$ sudo mdadm --examine /dev/sdb
mdadm: No md superblock detected on /dev/sdb.
ubuntu@ubuntu:/$ sudo mdadm --examine /dev/sdb1
mdadm: cannot open /dev/sdb1: No such file or directory
ubuntu@ubuntu:/$

Right now, I'm out of ideas of what to try next. I would appreciate it any help with this, as I'm really desperate to recover the data on this drive.
July 3, 2011 11:41:14 AM

Had a similar issue with MB based RAID 10. After a reboot my RAID array disappeared and in POST message I saw non member disks listed. I burned Ubuntu 11.04 and ran live option. installed mdadm and heres where I stand now:

I tried the sudo mdadm /dev/md0 and got an error

I looked in /dev to locate the mdxxx device

ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ sudo mdadm --detail /dev/md127
mdadm: only give one device per ARRAY line: /dev/md/Raid and 10
/dev/md127:
Version : imsm
Raid Level : container
Total Devices : 4

Working Devices : 4

UUID : 7a3c3fe1:99a40849:3c831724:2985e44a
Member Arrays :

Number Major Minor RaidDevice

0 8 32 - /dev/sdc
1 8 16 - /dev/sdb
2 8 0 - /dev/sda
3 8 48 - /dev/sdd

ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ sudo mdadm --examine /dev/sdb
mdadm: only give one device per ARRAY line: /dev/md/Raid and 10
/dev/sdb:
Magic : Intel Raid ISM Cfg Sig.
Version : 1.2.01
Orig Family : 9708cce2
Family : 97410700
Generation : 003a8f22
UUID : 7a3c3fe1:99a40849:3c831724:2985e44a
Checksum : af16e7fe correct
MPB Sectors : 2
Disks : 4
RAID Devices : 1

Disk01 Serial : WD-WCAS84120245
State : active
Id : 00030000
Usable Size : 976768654 (465.76 GiB 500.11 GB)

[Raid 10]:
UUID : 18e88b69:404ba170:fcf3bedb:26425aec
RAID Level : 10
Members : 4
Slots : [UUU_]
This Slot : 1
Array Size : 1953536000 (931.52 GiB 1000.21 GB)
Per Dev Size : 976768264 (465.76 GiB 500.11 GB)
Sector Offset : 0
Num Stripes : 3815500
Chunk Size : 64 KiB
Reserved : 0
Migrate State : idle
Map State : degraded
Dirty State : clean

Disk00 Serial : WD-WCAS84046860
State : active
Id : 00020000
Usable Size : 976768654 (465.76 GiB 500.11 GB)

Disk02 Serial : WD-WCAS84130880
State : active
Id : 00040000
Usable Size : 976768654 (465.76 GiB 500.11 GB)

Disk03 Serial : WD-WCAS84238191
State : active failed
Id : 00050000
Usable Size : 976768654 (465.76 GiB 500.11 GB)

ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ sudo dmraid -r
/dev/sdd: isw, "isw_cfdhdcjhgb", GROUP, ok, 976773166 sectors, data@ 0
/dev/sdc: isw, "isw_cfdhgcbcei", GROUP, ok, 976773166 sectors, data@ 0
/dev/sdb: isw, "isw_cfdhgcbcei", GROUP, ok, 976773166 sectors, data@ 0
/dev/sda: isw, "isw_cfdhgcbcei", GROUP, ok, 976773166 sectors, data@ 0
ubuntu@ubuntu:~$

I still cant view the device to copy to a new device?



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