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Does overclocking increase risk of raid 10 array failure?

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November 15, 2009 7:35:39 AM

Could overclocking increase risk of raid 10 array failure?
Asus P6t Dlx mb, X58, Intell ICH10 controller, Intell matrix mgr used to set up raid 10 array (4 WDFALS 1TB each) I7920 overclkd @ 152 (100 norm) - Randomly affects port 2 & 3. Have swaped identicall known good drives to these ports & rebuilt raid 10 array 6 times with same failures showing up within a few reboots.
Asus ran fine at overclocked settings for 9 months w 2 WD VelociRaptors (1 for boot drive) & 2 WD blue 650's @ raid 0
a c 126 G Storage
November 15, 2009 10:22:49 AM

It shouldn't, but your memory needs to be stable at all times or you have filesystem corruption no RAID can protect against.

Every PC should have run MemTest86+ to see if its stable and no memory errors pop up. If you haven't done this you have put your data at significant risk, no matter whether you use RAID or not.
a c 205 K Overclocking
November 15, 2009 12:26:31 PM

Overclocking can corrupt a single HDD much less a RAID array of any kind, however that would be related to what you call overclocking, using the super safe auto overclocking features your M/B usually comes with shouldn't be a problem.

However serious high end OCing, changing you settings and rebooting over and over until a stable OC is achieved, can corrupt any HDD and even cause a re-installation of the operating system.

Now if you already know your stable OC settings and are just going to build a new RAID array using those tried and true settings, then under those circumstances you should be just fine.
a c 126 G Storage
November 15, 2009 1:02:04 PM

Quote:
However serious high end OCing, changing you settings and rebooting over and over until a stable OC is achieved, can corrupt any HDD

Normally this is done without booting into the Operating System, unless he uses some windows-based overclocking utility. With just BIOS overclocking the disks won't even notice so no risk here. The risk is that memory mistakes will write corrupt data to the disks. RAID plays no part in this process; it would happen without RAID too.
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