Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

4850 driver bug?

Last response: in Systems
Share
July 11, 2008 1:45:56 PM

So yesterday I got all my components for my new rig in. This is what I got.
Gigabyte GA-X49-DS4
E8400
Corsair 750tx
4gb Corsair XMS2 800
WD Caviar 640gb
Cooler master RC-690
and last but not least the ASUS HD4850

I got everything hooked up, the bios recognizes everything, ram, HD, dvd drive, ect...
I installed Vista Business 64-bit, with no issues.
I updated the Chipset drivers using the cd provided, all drivers were updated, I am now able to get out to the internet ect...
I then installed the VGA driver that came with the card. I installed the catalyst and everything, it went off with no hitch. It said you need to restart your computer yada yada so I did. This is where the problem comes. Upon reboot, it gets through the POST and goes to the first windows loading screen (with the progress bar moving) after this screen it does a little flash and then the monitor turns off. It has that message like when your monitor is not plugged in to anything. I have to reboot in safe mode and do a system restore previous to the driver installation to get back to normal. I also d/led the "hotfix" driver online and tried that, same thing...
Anyone know of what could be causing this annoying issue?
(Sorry for the long description of the problem)

More about : 4850 driver bug

July 11, 2008 2:17:14 PM

First, you MUST use the Hotfix driver for the least bugs. Try the other DVI port on the card, also under safe mode in CCC check off "alternate DVI" to see if that does it.

Edit, you may have to connect a VGA monitor in addition to the LCD, let it boot into the VGA, then under Advanced Properties set the LCD as Primary monitor, then disable the VGA monitor in same, then reboot with the VGA disconnected.

P.S, I'm assuming it IS an LCD monitor giving the problems? If it's a VGA monitor then it's probably just out of range. Set to 800 X 600 60Hx in Safe mode and reboot.
July 11, 2008 2:23:50 PM

I can't even get into CCC in safe mode. I have also tried using th eother HDMI port. Should I install the hotfix then install the software from the cd overtop? I have installed both, but not at the same time.
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
July 11, 2008 2:27:29 PM

The "Hotfix" is the complete standalone suite and drivers. Uninstall all ATI software from Control Panel, then on next boot install JUST the Hotfix Suite.

Edit again.. note the additional stuff I added to my first message..
July 11, 2008 2:32:27 PM

yes it is a lcd monitor, a 24 in ACER. I have also installed JUST the hotfix suite without the other ATI software installed. Still same problem :(  I wish there was more documentation for this card.
July 11, 2008 2:55:41 PM

I'm just wondering how long you are waiting after the screen goes blank before hitting the reset button? Are you doing it right away or leaving it for a minute or two to see if the PC comes back to life?

Also, do you have the option of using a VGA cable instead of DVI?
July 11, 2008 3:00:07 PM

slayeron444 said:
yes it is a lcd monitor, a 24 in ACER. I have also installed JUST the hotfix suite without the other ATI software installed. Still same problem :(  I wish there was more documentation for this card.


Oh it's not the card, I've had this issue with my LG 24" LCD at various times with the 1900XT, HD3870, and 4850. Try having a VGA monitor connected at boot, as I suggested. And don't say you can't find a VGA monitor, as an example they're going for $1 each at my local Goodwill, even 19"-ers! They fill a whole corner of the room.
July 11, 2008 3:03:29 PM

Yea, I give it at least a minute or two to see what happens. My monitor has a VGA cable that came with it. Can I use that and a VGA to DVI adaptor you think instead of going out and getting a new vga monitor?
July 11, 2008 3:04:36 PM

First, be sure to uninstall CCC and the display driver in safe mode. Then, try installing the 8.7 beta drivers. I heard they have better compatibility than even the hotfix. Just google 8.7 beta. Do you have any other monitors you could try? Does it keep booting even when the screen goes blank (can you hear the Windows boot sound)?
July 11, 2008 3:11:23 PM

No, it does not keep re-booting after it goes black. I have yet to hook up my speakers so I don't know if it makes the noise or not when windows opens up. I will have to try another monitor I guess. I am just not sure why an lcd DVI monitor would cause an issue with a brand new card.
July 11, 2008 3:20:43 PM

slayeron444 said:
No, it does not keep re-booting after it goes black. I have yet to hook up my speakers so I don't know if it makes the noise or not when windows opens up. I will have to try another monitor I guess. I am just not sure why an lcd DVI monitor would cause an issue with a brand new card.


There's no such thing as a "VGA to DVI adaptor." The card can feed VGA to a VGA monitor because VGA is already on the pins. The adaptor just accesses those pins. You can feed VGA through the card-back adaptor that came with the card to the VGA input of the LCD monitor.

This is a common issue, whether the card is new or not. And it's NOT the drivers in particular. You can get a VGA monitor for my two-monitor boot suggestion from Cash Convertors, or the local Charity Sales outlet, or from the curbside on trash collection day. Any old VGA set will do. Once it's set up to boot to the LCD then the VGA monitor can be put aside.
July 11, 2008 3:24:39 PM

BustedSony said:
Once it's set up to boot to the LCD then the VGA monitor can be put aside.


So how do I set it to boot to the LCD? Is it a setting somewhere within the catalyst program?
July 11, 2008 3:54:00 PM

slayeron444 said:
So how do I set it to boot to the LCD? Is it a setting somewhere within the catalyst program?


No, this is basic old-fashioned stuff. In monitor properties, the Windows desktop control panel, extend the desktop across both the VGA and LCD monitors (clone, Span, different refresh rates, it doesn't matter) then when the LCD comes alive set it as the Primary monitor then disable the VGA. It will use these settings for the next boot, with the LCD as the Primary/boot monitor.
July 11, 2008 4:04:41 PM

ah ok. I guess I was trying to think outside the box. I used to do this with my laptop, running it off my acer monitor. Thanks for the help everyone, when I get home from work I will try a few of these ideas.

P.S.
I am just curious as to the explanation of why the card or the card's drivers don't like the LCD when it is first booted up? that is if anyone has time to answer it. if not no biggy.
July 11, 2008 4:27:20 PM

slayeron444 said:
P.S.
I am just curious as to the explanation of why the card or the card's drivers don't like the LCD when it is first booted up? that is if anyone has time to answer it. if not no biggy.


HDMI/DVI seems to be an imperfect science. Connection problems also occur with hi-def TVs on satellite receivers and PS3's etc. I find that a particular cable with DVI one end and HDMI the other works more reliably than a double-ended HDMI cable going through the HDMI to DVI adaptor. Also the "alternate DVI' setting has helped, but that does indeed seem related to particular driver builds...

So it goes.. :pt1cable: 
July 11, 2008 5:06:04 PM

BustedSony said:
There's no such thing as a "VGA to DVI adaptor."


I have to take partial exception to that comment busted. I own an HP 22" widescreen with a VGA and HDMI connector. Before I got a DVI to HDMI adaptor, I used a "DVI to VGA cable". While there might not be a standalone adapter, there are ways to go from DVI to VGA.
July 11, 2008 5:44:08 PM

hyperjoe said:
I have to take partial exception to that comment busted. I own an HP 22" widescreen with a VGA and HDMI connector. Before I got a DVI to HDMI adaptor, I used a "DVI to VGA cable". While there might not be a standalone adapter, there are ways to go from DVI to VGA.


The connector on the video card is a DVI-A, which means it has both digital and analog output pins. That DVI-VGA cable is passing through the analog signal from the card's DVI port. There is no such thing as a convertor cable for DVI to Analog, which is what you mean. That would require a box with a complete digital to analog decoder and encoder. And DVI-D connectors HAVE no analog output, thus a VGA monitor couldn't be connected to one of those regardless.

Read the fourth paragraph here.. Also the section under "connector."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Visual_Interface
July 11, 2008 7:39:04 PM

BustedSony said:
The connector on the video card is a DVI-A, which means it has both digital and analog output pins. That DVI-VGA cable is passing through the analog signal from the card's DVI port. There is no such thing as a convertor cable for DVI to Analog, which is what you mean. That would require a box with a complete digital to analog decoder and encoder. And DVI-D connectors HAVE no analog output, thus a VGA monitor couldn't be connected to one of those regardless.

Read the fourth paragraph here.. Also the section under "connector."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Visual_Interface


I hate to hijack this thread, but I'm still a little confused. When you say "VGA monitor" do you mean a monitor with a VGA (15 pin) input? Or a CRT monitor?

And where did you get that I was referring to digital/analog signals? My response had nothing to do with the TYPE of video I got from my DVI video card into my VGA connector of my Widescreen monitor. All I was saying is that I connected my DVI connector on my Video card to my VGA connection on my monitor with one of the cables found here:

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage.jsp;jsessionid=RMYW0G3GU2XPZKC4D3IFAFY?_dyncharset=ISO-8859-1&id=pcat17071&type=page&st=dvi+to+vga&sc=Global&cp=1&nrp=15&sp=&qp=&list=n&iht=y&usc=All+Categories&ks=960

Maybe we are confusing what we think we're each talking about...
July 11, 2008 10:14:08 PM

hyperjoe said:
I hate to hijack this thread, but I'm still a little confused. When you say "VGA monitor" do you mean a monitor with a VGA (15 pin) input? Or a CRT monitor?

And where did you get that I was referring to digital/analog signals? My response had nothing to do with the TYPE of video I got from my DVI video card into my VGA connector of my Widescreen monitor. All I was saying is that I connected my DVI connector on my Video card to my VGA connection on my monitor with one of the cables found here:

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage.jsp;jsessionid=RMYW0G3GU2XPZKC4D3IFAFY?_dyncharset=ISO-8859-1&id=pcat17071&type=page&st=dvi+to+vga&sc=Global&cp=1&nrp=15&sp=&qp=&list=n&iht=y&usc=All+Categories&ks=960

Maybe we are confusing what we think we're each talking about...


That cable is a VGA pass-through, it uses the VGA pins on the DVI-A connector and terminates it the other end with a standard VGA D-sub. By "VGA monitor" I mean anything that accepts a VGA input, usually on the standard 15-pin D-sub conector we know so well. Either a CRT monitor or the VGA input of an LCD monitor fits the bill. Remember that some high-end CRT monitors do accept HDMI...
January 9, 2009 12:06:06 AM

Did anyone solve this? I'm having OP's same problem, and its with an Asus 4850 TOP. Does OP have same card? I need to figure this out. Only thing I haven't tried is hotfix.
January 21, 2009 7:47:20 PM

Turns out if you get this problem it's most likely the monitor, or your monitor cable. It happened to my cousin once, and he said he tried a different cable and it worked fine. I also had this problem while building my friend's computer, and it was more likely his monitor PORT on his LCD. We switched over to his spare monitor and it worked fine.
This may have to do with a cable or monitor not being able to pick up DVI mode using the card, or may have something to do with the amount of information that the 4850 would try (and fail) to send through the cable to the monitor.
May 18, 2009 6:26:27 AM

I strongly disagree with Anything related to Moniter ports on an LCD or anything to do with moniter not being able to pick up DVI mode. The issue your dealing with is a driver issue in general that ATI has NOt fixed, that all Radeon 4800's series cards are occassionally plagued with. Let me rephrase that, the cards' by them self are a good card. ITs the way they are unifying the driver package for the card that is just TRASH.
ATI needs to fix the way the ATIKMDAG.SYS is running the card.
Because its had the following errors on my system so far:
(BSOD)*too many to count even in 1 hour's time/
red lines in the screen
checker board dots...
Green dots on the screen etc...

(I've managed temporarly to get around the above problems by forcing windows to use its generic VGA display driver)... but can't play any games.

ATIKMDAG.SYS
This is known to switching the card from one display resolution to another.
Its also known to cause crashes when it wants to kick up the fan when it detects it needs to auto cool the card.
SO Vista will randomly detect the card driver is failing, due to system buffer overload in bad paged memory/paged fault in non paged area/ or bad pool caller. etc.. All of these problems are the ATI drivers at fault.
Unfortunately Installing the Latest drivers from ATI

still are not fixing the problem... as they haven't dealt with the problems that originally occur within the ( ATIKMDAG.SYS ) and how its interfacing between the card and the operating system.

!