Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

I7 920 Heat Issues

Tags:
  • CPUs
  • Intel i7
  • Overclocking
Last response: in Overclocking
Share
August 6, 2009 1:37:40 AM

Hi everyone,

Im fairly new to overclocking but I have been reading for months in preparation for my first ever build, which was fairly easy, my goal for the i7 is just 3.2ghz. The problem is that the load temperatures are ridiculously high as well as idle temperatures. I wanted to confirm if its my room as it has no AC due to a narrow window but Im using a fan =( or its how my HSF is fitted which I thought I did quite well.

Specs:
Antec 1200 - Case
P6T Deluxe v2 - Mobo
Intel i7 920 - CPU
OCZ Low Voltage 6gb DDR3 1600mhz - RAM
Thermalright Ultra-120 Rev. B - HSF
EVGA GTX 275 - GPU
Corsair 1000HX - PSU
Anything crucial missing?

Currently idle temps are 47c and load temperature is 75c.

Im constantly running Prime95 everytime I lower the core voltage, currently its at 1.1v, the cpu PLL voltage is stock 1.8v, and the rest is auto. Also is there a set time I should run it for before lowering the voltage even more?

More about : 920 heat issues

August 6, 2009 2:08:07 AM

Just downloaded Speedfan to see if Core Temp is giving me wrong temperatures, Speedfan is now recording my CPU temperature to be 40c at idle and 32c for the cores, at load for Speedfan its showing 60c max.

For Speedfan should I be looking at the cores or the CPU temperature?
And which of the two programs should I look at for real temperatures?
August 6, 2009 2:47:01 AM

I always use hardware monitor. I was able to get my 920 to 3.35 w/ stock and it ran at 80 degrees full load, so I think that yours is normal. But it looks like you are able to run a good overclock at low voltage, so you should pick up a liquid cooler and see how far you can push that chip.
Related resources
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
August 6, 2009 3:11:21 AM

skyre said:

Specs:
Antec 1200 - Case
P6T Deluxe v2 - Mobo
Intel i7 920 - CPU
OCZ Low Voltage 6gb DDR3 1600mhz - RAM
Thermalright Ultra-120 Rev. B - HSF
EVGA GTX 275 - GPU
Corsair 1000HX - PSU
Anything crucial missing?

Currently idle temps are 47c and load temperature is 75c


Typical full load temps with the stock cooler are around 70-80C. Core i7 does run warm, and I haven't had any issues up to 95C. Remember that it sounds really hot to us, and looks really hot compared to older processors, but its still below the boiling point of water.

I certainly hope that silicon is a little more durable than water :p 
August 6, 2009 3:34:51 AM

Another quick question, should I keep SpeedStep enabled or disabled?
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
August 6, 2009 12:19:00 PM

skyre said:
Just downloaded Speedfan to see if Core Temp is giving me wrong temperatures, Speedfan is now recording my CPU temperature to be 40c at idle and 32c for the cores, at load for Speedfan its showing 60c max.

For Speedfan should I be looking at the cores or the CPU temperature?
And which of the two programs should I look at for real temperatures?
Core i7 specs:

Vcore Max 1.375
Tcase Max (CPU temp) 68c
Tjunction (Core temp) 73c
August 6, 2009 2:26:21 PM

CompuTronix said:
Core i7 specs:

Vcore Max 1.375
Tcase Max (CPU temp) 68c
Tjunction (Core temp) 73c


Im not sure if I understand your reply, but I did read your overclocking guide.
Is the max temps for the i7 920 C0 same as the D0? D0 is what I have.
If I understood correctly, CPU temp and Core temp should have a ~5c differemce.
My max load on the i7 should be 68c for the CPU temp and 73c for the Core temp?
So if my CPU temp was 40c at idle, I can assume my Core temp should be ~45c?

Its overclocked at only 3.2ghz and these temperatures seem to be way high when using a Thermalright Ultra-120. Cable management is fine as well, only thing sticking out would be my 8 pin power cable which I plan to get an extension to run it behind the case. Could it be that my room is causing it to be this warm as theres no AC in here or the seating of the cooler is bad?
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
August 7, 2009 5:11:03 AM

skyre said:
Im not sure if I understand your reply, but I did read your overclocking guide.
I wrote the Temperature Guide, not the Overclocking Guide.
skyre said:
Is the max temps for the i7 920 C0 same as the D0? D0 is what I have.
All Core i7 variants have the same voltage and thermal specifications.
skyre said:
If I understood correctly, CPU temp and Core temp should have a ~5c difference.
My max load on the i7 should be 68c for the CPU temp and 73c for the Core temp?
So if my CPU temp was 40c at idle, I can assume my Core temp should be ~45c?
Your understanding is correct.
skyre said:
Its overclocked at only 3.2ghz and these temperatures seem to be way high when using a Thermalright Ultra-120. Cable management is fine as well, only thing sticking out would be my 8 pin power cable which I plan to get an extension to run it behind the case. Could it be that my room is causing it to be this warm as theres no AC in here or the seating of the cooler is bad?
Under the conditions detailed for the Test Setup in the Calibrations Section of my Guide, which always references 22c Standard Ambient, (as in my signature), your i7 would idle about 25c CPU and 30c Core ... so yes, high ambient temperature as well as increased Vcore directly and adversely affect temperatures.

Comp :sol: 
August 7, 2009 12:30:21 PM

Yeah, I meant temperature guide, feeling sick, couldnt think straight.

I set my Vcore to 1.05v stable so temperatures shouldnt be high due to Vcore, which means I can conclude ambient temperature is the major player in my high temperatures. I also reseated my heatsink just to double check if the seating was bad and it wasnt.

So in conclusion, it was my high room temperature thats doing this. Thanks.
August 21, 2009 5:32:31 PM

"Is the max temps for the i7 920 C0 same as the D0? D0 is what I have."

Hi Skyre

Most definately not. DO stepping runs cooler than CO stepping, when overclocked and when not. If you have DO, you're laughing. Lucky you I have CO :( 
August 21, 2009 10:29:14 PM

skyre said:
Another quick question, should I keep SpeedStep enabled or disabled?


Yes it is just to reduce multiplier when idle to reduce power usage keep it on it is good.
Also matt77 my PSU is a bit overkill but your PSU wow except if you plan quad sli lol
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
August 22, 2009 12:49:45 AM

matt77 said:
"Is the max temps for the i7 920 C0 same as the D0? D0 is what I have."

Hi Skyre

Most definately not. DO stepping runs cooler than CO stepping, when overclocked and when not. If you have DO, you're laughing. Lucky you I have CO :( 
matt77,

Sorry, but your answer is "most definately not" correct, and is misleading to our Forum readers. Respectfully, I already answered skyre's question correctly in my post above: "All Core i7 variants have the same voltage and thermal specifications."

Core i7 variants include:

975 D0
965 C0
950 D0
940 C0
920 D0
920 C0

Intel's Thermal Specifications are shown in their Processor Spec Finder - http://processorfinder.intel.com/Default.aspx

Again, specs for all Core i7's are:

Vcore Max 1.375
Tcase Max (CPU temp) 68c
Tjunction (Core temp) 73c

Remember that Intel's thermal specification for desktop processors is defined as Tcase Max (CPU temp) NOT Tjunction Max (Core temp), which is a very common misconception among most users. The wording that Intel uses for their specifications are about as clear as mud, and hasn't been updated since the Pentium D era, which is why there continues to be so much confusion. Further, it doesn't help that Intel has been less than forthcoming with clarification.

Also, keep in mind that there's a 5c gradient between CPU temperature and Core temperature, which is shown in the following Intel document - http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/0709/0709.1861.pdf - so you always have to add 5c to their thermal specification to get the corresponding Core temperature.

Intel's second, and very controversial thermal specification, Tjunction Max, (which is 100c for all i7's), applies to overtemp protection such as throttle and shutdown conditions. Any i7 Core temperature which exceeds 73c should be considered overtemp.

I think your intention was to simply point out that D0's will typically overclock ~ 200 Mhz higher than C0's at similar voltages and temperatures. Since there are about 101 thermal variables between user platforms and individual C0 and D0 processor bins, any further distinctions or conclusions require apples to apples comparisons.

I hope this helps to make the topic clear for our readers.

Comp :sol: 
August 22, 2009 9:27:19 AM

CompuTronix said:
matt77,

Sorry, but your answer is "most definately not" correct, and is misleading to our Forum readers. Respectfully, I already answered skyre's question correctly in my post above: "All Core i7 variants have the same voltage and thermal specifications."

Core i7 variants include:

975 D0
965 C0
950 D0
940 C0
920 D0
920 C0

Intel's Thermal Specifications are shown in their Processor Spec Finder - http://processorfinder.intel.com/Default.aspx

Again, specs for all Core i7's are:

Vcore Max 1.375
Tcase Max (CPU temp) 68c
Tjunction (Core temp) 73c

Remember that Intel's thermal specification for desktop processors is defined as Tcase Max (CPU temp) NOT Tjunction Max (Core temp), which is a very common misconception among most users. The wording that Intel uses for their specifications are about as clear as mud, and hasn't been updated since the Pentium D era, which is why there continues to be so much confusion. Further, it doesn't help that Intel has been less than forthcoming with clarification.

Also, keep in mind that there's a 5c gradient between CPU temperature and Core temperature, which is shown in the following Intel document - http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/0709/0709.1861.pdf - so you always have to add 5c to their thermal specification to get the corresponding Core temperature.

Intel's second, and very controversial thermal specification, Tjunction Max, (which is 100c for all i7's), applies to overtemp protection such as throttle and shutdown conditions. Any i7 Core temperature which exceeds 73c should be considered overtemp.

I think your intention was to simply point out that D0's will typically overclock ~ 200 Mhz higher than C0's at similar voltages and temperatures. Since there are about 101 thermal variables between user platforms and individual C0 and D0 processor bins, any further distinctions or conclusions require apples to apples comparisons.

I hope this helps to make the topic clear for our readers.

Comp :sol: 



Thanks for that. I didn't wish to mislead. I was trying to say that, from my own and others' experience, DO stepping tends to overclock at cooler temps than CO. It's just what i've experienced, that's all.
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
August 22, 2009 9:45:40 AM

matt77 said:
Thanks for that. I didn't wish to mislead. I was trying to say that, from my own and others' experience, DO stepping tends to overclock at cooler temps than CO. It's just what i've experienced, that's all.


I'd also like to throw in a cautionary observation:

My own D0 samples have not had a significant overclocking advatange over C0 when using a 3-fan liquid-cooling radiator. Here's what I've personally found:

1.) The D0 gets to 4.0 GHz at lower voltage than the C0
2.) The D0 overheats at a lower voltage than the C0
3.) The voltage needed to make the D0 overclock significantly better than the C0 often causes it to overheat.

Overclockers should find at least small gains (~100MHz) using the D0, and the higher voltage required to get the C0 to 4.0 GHz may penalize it more when a less-effective cooler is used. But if you're shooting for the moon, you may be disappointed by some D0 samples.
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
August 22, 2009 10:43:28 AM

Thanks Crashman. My findings were somewhat similar.

I tested 7 C0 920's and 5 D0 920's to identify a processor from each stepping which reached the highest stable overclock on high-end air, at the lowest voltages and temperatures.

Although there is some correlation between batch numbers and the key performance indicators (OC, Vcore, temps), I continue to run my best C0 sample (3836B), because the best D0 sample that I tested offered no clear incentives to swap it out. As such, my D0 samples were obviously lacking as a typical cross-section, since i7 articles and processor Forums agree that the D0 is an improvement. I probably just wasn't fortunate enough to have a winner among my five samples.

Comp :sol: 
June 10, 2010 1:07:28 AM

Good info. My i7 is at 3.9ghz with hyperthreading on and I idle around 47-54 and peak around 75. Am I okay with these temps? Will this effect the lifetime of my cpu?

All of my voltages are at the default settings my motherboard had it set to.

1.25 vcore and 1.175
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
June 10, 2010 2:10:37 AM

vexun11 said:
Good info. My i7 is at 3.9ghz with hyperthreading on and I idle around 47-54 and peak around 75. Am I okay with these temps? Will this effect the lifetime of my cpu?

All of my voltages are at the default settings my motherboard had it set to.

1.25 vcore and 1.175


If those are the actual full-load temps, they're fine. By actual temps I mean using a program that reads the core (like RealTemp). By actual full load I mean a program that uses all eight threads (like multi-threaded Prime95).
!