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Replacing my ide drive with SATA

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December 1, 2009 11:52:15 PM

I finally ran out of of storage space on my computer. I was running an 80gb ide drive and a 320gb sata, but I just bought a new 1tb sata to replace the older 80gb IDE drive. My BIOS recognizes both SATA drives which I have installed, but somehow the BIOS does not give me the option of selecting the 1tb drive as the primary boot, only the 320gb disk, my floppy drive, cd rom drive, and NVIDIA boot agent.

I had the 1tb drive working before when I had installed it to copy all the files from the 80gb harddrive over to it. I booted into windows no problem, but now I cant even get to windows. I have installed windows on the 1tb drive.

Any ideas?
a b G Storage
December 2, 2009 5:17:47 AM

AFAIK, some mobos only allow the "first" drive connected drive to be a boot device. Can you try disconnecting the 320GB drive and see what happens?
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a c 348 G Storage
December 2, 2009 12:12:19 PM

You say you "installed it to copy all the files from the 80gb harddrive over to it". Then you say "I have installed windows on the 1tb drive. " Just how did you "install" windows? Did you run the Windows Install disk to do a new full installation on that drive? Or did you copy all the OS files from the old 80 GB to the new one?

To be able to boot from any HDD there are a few hidden files plus some data bits in the HDD's MBR that need to be set up right. Otherwise the BIOS will NOT be able to boot from the HDD unit.

IF you do not need any of the stuff on the 1 TB unit now (that is, it is all on other drives anyway), easiest path I know is to start again and use the free utility tools provided by your HDD manufacturer designed exactly for this task. This is a version of "cloning" - the version in which you copy absolutely EVERYTHING from an old HDD to a new larger one and make the new one bootable so that you can replace the original with the new one. The trick is, you must go the the website of the maker of your NEW disk unit. Their tools will only make a clone TO one of their own HDD units - they don't care whose old unit you are leaving behind as you migrate.

Seagate has Disk Wizard, WD has Acronis True Image WD Edition, and both really are customized versions of a very powerful package by Acronis. Make sure you download the manual for the software, too, and read it - you may find it VERY helpful later for other tasks. Other HDD makers probably have similar packages. You download it for free and install on your existing C: drive. I'd suggest you connect only your 80 GB C: drive and the new one, then run the software. Pay attention to a few items:
1. Be SURE you set the new drive as the Destination Drive - everything on the Destination will be destroyed and replaced!
2. Have it Delete any and all Partitions already on that new drive before proceeding.
3. As you set up the cloning operation, check the size of the Partition it makes on the new drive. It may default to making it 80 GB to match your old one. Set it manually to the size you want, up to the full disk size.
4. Make sure you check that the new disk will be bootable.
5. For File System, choose NTFS unless you really know you need FAT32 for some reason.
6. A Quick Format option will do all the formatting required in about 10 to 15 minutes before copying everything over. A Full Format will do the formatting, then take MANY HOURS to do exhaustive testing of the entire disk for errors before it tries to use it. This is not usually necessary for a new HDD unit, but if you have the time (like overnight) and want to be cautious, choose this option.
7. After the cloning is finished you want to have the 1 TB new unit take over as your C: drive. My recommendation is to shut down and disconnect power, then disconnect both power and data cables from the old 80 GB unit, and plug the new one into the same mobo SATA port the old one was using. Re-connect your other drive if you disconnected temporarily for the cloning work. The 80 GB unit now is a backup of everything up to the cloning operation. I'd suggest you leave it unused for awhile until you are positive the new system is working just fine. Then you can do what you want with it - move it, wipe it out and make it a non-bootable data drive - whatever. So for now you can leave it in the case disconnected, or remove it for storage.
8. When you boot up again go immediately into BIOS Setup and confirm your HDD's are connected and working, and the Boot Priority Sequence is set as you want - my usual would be optical drive first, new 1 TB HDD second, and no other choices, but you decide your way.
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December 2, 2009 3:10:20 PM

Thanks for both your response, im at work now but ill them when I get home.

1)Just how did you "install" windows? Did you run the Windows Install disk to do a new full installation on that drive? Or did you copy all the OS files from the old 80 GB to the new one?

I formatted the 1tb harddrive (long way, took about 4 hours) and then installed windows onto it from my Windows cd. After that, I copied a few files from the 80gb harddrive over, no windows files, just pictures, movies, music, etc.

2)My recommendation is to shut down and disconnect power, then disconnect both power and data cables from the old 80 GB unit, and plug the new one into the same mobo SATA port the old one was using.

I just want to be clear here, my 80gb is NOT SATA, so I cannot plug my new hardrive into the "same mobo SATA port". Is it possible that I must have an IDE harddrive for my motherboard to function? I forget my mobo atm, ill post it when I get home.

EDIT: I put the 80gb back in and I am in the process of using acronis to clone it to the 1tb drive. Ill post the results after work.
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a c 348 G Storage
December 3, 2009 12:57:34 PM

On the install process, I think that should have worked, but just MAYBE not. You say you "Formatted" the HDD first (that means you did both the Partition and Format jobs), then used the Windows Install Disk to install on the HDD. You may or may not have made the Partition on the HDD bootable. I would hope that Windows Install would ensure that the Partition to which it installs is made bootable, but maybe not. So just MAYBE your Partition was not bootable.

On your second point, sorry, I goofed! I forget your 80 GB unit was IDE. No, you do NOT need to have an IDE drive connected in order to run your system. In your case, I'd suggest that you connect the new SATA drive to the first SATA port, probably labeled SATA_0, although this is NOT completely necessary. (In fact, that port may already be occupied by your 320 GB unit, so don't bother changing that - just use another SATA port.) Once the cloning is done, disconnect the IDE drive, but watch for a small detail. In many such systems the C: drive is jumpered as the Master device on the IDE0 port, and an optical drive shares its port / cable and is jumpered as Slave on that port. If you remove the IDE drive from the port leaving one other device on it, that lonely device must take over being the Master. You should re-adjust its jumpers to Master, and maybe change the connector so it is plugged into the END of the cable. However, if there never was any second device sharing the cable with your 80 GB unit you are disconnecting, then NO changes need to be made.

There are adjustments to be made in the BIOS Setup screens, however. At the very beginning when you first install the new 1TB unit, you'll need to check the BIOS Setup screen to be sure the port you use is Enabled, and that its mode it set right. I don't know which Windows you are using. Win XP does not have drivers built in for any HDD type except IDE - it does not understand SATA without added drivers, and I'm sure you did not install it that way on an IDE drive. On the other hand, Vista and Win 7 DO understand SATA, so this may not be an issue for you. But if we assume XP, there's a setting you need. Sata ports can be set on modern mobos to one of four modes: IDE (or PATA) Emulation, native SATA, AHCI, or RAID. To use a SATA drive under Win XP, the simplest way is to set the IDE Emulation mode in which the mobo takes control of the port and makes Windows believe it is a plain IDE drive it already understands, and there is no problem. This is how you should set it in your case, most likely. IF you have Vista or Win 7, you may well be able to set this mode to native SATA and it should work.

Once you have this port Enabled and its mode set, you can install the HDD and run the cloning operation. Then you shut down and disconnect the old IDE drive, changing jumpers if necessary as above. When you boot up, go immediately into BIOS Setup again and this time look for where you specify the Boot Priority Sequence. Ensure it uses your new 1 TB unit on the right SATA port, and does NOT try any other HDD unit. You may make this one the second choice, after trying the optical drive first. Save and Exit from here and the whole thing should boot up just fine from your new drive.
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December 3, 2009 5:08:39 PM

I cloned the 80gb to the new drive (I selected to have it choose the settings automatically which should make the new drive bootable) however, I still cannot boot from the new harddrive. I have it plugged into the same slot I was using for my 320gb drive, which is also sata, so I know that windows can see sata drives from that slot, but even when I have the 1tb drive as the only drive installed, I cannot boot from it. Windows brings up a black screen with writing saying there are problems with the boot path.

I could not find settings in my bios for PATA either.

"AFAIK, some mobos only allow the "first" drive connected drive to be a boot device. Can you try disconnecting the 320GB drive and see what happens?"

I tried this, unfortunately to no avail.
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December 3, 2009 11:43:51 PM

Thanks everyone, I finally got it up and running. I just put the 1tb drive in by itself, formatted and installed windows and then everything worked. For some reason I dont think Aconis was making the hard drive bootable.
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