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Will you help me with my low throughput?

Last response: in Storage
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December 2, 2009 2:59:03 PM

I just built my first computer and everything is running great except that I have low throughput on my HDDs.

Here is my setup:

ASUS p6t
I7 overclocked to 3.8
2 Western Digital 300 GB VelociRaptor SATA 10,000 RPM 16 MB Cache Bulk/OEM Desktop Hard Drive WD3000HLFS in RAID 0
NVIDIA GTX 295
1 Corsair TR3X6G1600C8D Dominator 6 GB 3 x 2 GB PC3-12800 1600MHz 240-Pin DDR3 Core i7 Memory Kit

I am running the RAID on the Intel R10 builtin controller.

When I run the window experience I get 7.8 on everything except on HDD throughput, 6.2

On PCMARK I am scoring 11200

Here are my throughputs:

HDD-importing pictures to: 49.52 MB/s
HDD-Windows Media: 101.54 MB/s
HDD - gaming: 18.49 MB/s
HDD - adding music to Windows: 9.17 MB/s
HDD - application loading: 8.49 MB/s

I am trying to setup the fastest possible configuration for Video Production.

I know there are a lot of guys that are very knowledgeable here.

Thank you for any help you can offer.

More about : low throughput

a b G Storage
December 7, 2009 1:12:48 AM

It's never a good idea to use your mobo's built-in controller. As stated in the RAID FAQ, your best bet is to use a dedicated RAID controller if you want to maximize your setup.
December 7, 2009 2:27:23 AM

If I change raid controllers will have to reformat my drives or otherwise lose my data stored on them? I have an image but I want to know what I'm getting myself into.

Also, if you are kind enough to respond to this question can you also mention any controllers you think might be better suited to video production, or one in general you prefer?

Thanks for your thoughts.
Related resources
a b G Storage
December 7, 2009 4:52:22 AM

What's wrong with those numbers? As for the 6.2, that's because random access is a large portion of Windows 7's windows experience index score, and to score >6.5 or so, you need an SSD. Your setup is fine for a high capacity, high speed setup.

Oh, and the Intel RAID controller is fine. Make sure to turn on the write-back cache for maximum performance.
December 7, 2009 10:25:56 AM

I found this on another site:
Quote:
Write-back caching is only available for RAID5 arrays with the IMS. I believe this was a conscious decision on their part as write-back caching really shines only in situations where write speeds are low, as in the case of RAID5 due to the sheer amount of extra work required. The Intel implementation is also more along the lines of a coalescer. Rather than having a dedicated cache memory module to store writes for opportunistic exection, the IMS queues up the writes for optimization purposes and then writes these back at certain points in time.

On the side, I wouldn't enable write-back caching on a RAID0 array; they're dangerous enough as is and a dirty shutdown could mean disaster.


What are your thoughts about that?

a b G Storage
December 8, 2009 4:06:54 AM

Just ignore that Windows 7 score. The disk scores are really harsh. I would test your setup with the apps you are going to use just to be sure but video editing should be no sweat. As far as write back cache goes, I get much better streaming speed with it on during a benchmark, but I have no idea if it helps in an app. Yes there is a risk of data integrity on a dirty shutdown.
a b G Storage
December 8, 2009 9:07:16 AM

sfc_01 said:
I found this on another site:
Quote:
Write-back caching is only available for RAID5 arrays with the IMS. I believe this was a conscious decision on their part as write-back caching really shines only in situations where write speeds are low, as in the case of RAID5 due to the sheer amount of extra work required. The Intel implementation is also more along the lines of a coalescer. Rather than having a dedicated cache memory module to store writes for opportunistic exection, the IMS queues up the writes for optimization purposes and then writes these back at certain points in time.

On the side, I wouldn't enable write-back caching on a RAID0 array; they're dangerous enough as is and a dirty shutdown could mean disaster.


What are your thoughts about that?

Write back caching is fine. It does slightly increase the risk of data corruption if you don't shut down properly, but unless you're in the habit of shutting your computer down by just pulling the plug, it shouldn't be an issue. It also significantly improves performance.
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