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Database of Test Specifications and Settings

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August 25, 2009 10:34:59 AM

Any chance THW could collate the verified results of their own and other tests on overclocking (and other tests) into a database resource allowing individuals to search for all overclocking results perhaps matching the CPU and/or memory and/or motherboard to determine what settings might work for them or allowing them to choose components on the basis of such tests.

It would be helpful to have all the results in one place rather than having to trawl through hundreds of articles.
a c 197 K Overclocking
August 25, 2009 10:56:34 AM

The problem is that there's so much variability between components. That's why the guides are guides and not cookbooks. That's also why the regulars (we :)  ) push for those who are interested in overclocking to learn some of the principles behind overclocking.
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Overclocking since 1978 - Z80 (TRS-80) from 1.77 MHz to 2.01 MHz
August 25, 2009 12:03:58 PM

One definite example is the Q6600, some can take it to 4GHz with ease, some have a hard time at 3.5GHz. (These are different batches and not different steppings). Besides there are a lot of other posts on other forums of popular processors that list the highest attempts by other people (i.e. E5200).
Related resources
a c 197 K Overclocking
August 25, 2009 12:44:47 PM

amnotanoobie said:
One definite example is the Q6600, some can take it to 4GHz with ease, some have a hard time at 3.5GHz.

I have one of those. I can get mine to 3.6 GHz relatively easily. It will boot at 3.8 GHz but is not stable. Average is about 3.4 - 3.6 GHz. One poster here awhile back could barely reach 3.4 GHz., but he had an unusually VID.

Practically everything matters. Anything inside the case, at the least, can affect airflow.
August 25, 2009 6:59:59 PM

I am well aware of the huge variety of components and the fact that some components perform better than other apparently identical components or that components sometimes are improved as in the refinements that resulted in two versions of the same CPU such as the Q6600. (I have the G0 95W version on an Asus MB)

The purpose of a central database is not to fill it with a definitive list of all the permutations of components tested in combination, but mearly to record each successful attempt so others may attempt to replicate it. These attempts need not be record breaking or fantastic but by recording the achievements of not just the THW staff but the efforts of other enthusiasts, you are thereby also allowing other less experienced computer users to more safely reproduce the adjustments with less risk to their own machines.

Remember that not everyone wants to burn out their computers squeezing a few extra Mhz out but might be glad of a small 10 - 20 (or more) % increase in performance with small increases in power consumption or heat, up to the point where the gains in performance are too small and power consumption increases significantly negating the benefits.

It would seem foolish to expect everyone to learn overclocking skills, there are many to whom this is simply not possible, they have very little technical aptitude or hope of ever learning, the supplementary equipment necessary to facilitate extreme experimentation or anything more than the ability to make a few small changes to the BIOS.

It would also seem selfish not to provide such a resource since much of the computer hardware and software industry is geared to compatbility, inter-operability and co-operation and a prime example of this is Linux. The community comes together to develop and improve the Operating System and Resources.

It is a shame Toms Hardware is incapable of providing such a simple yet inovative resource to help others.
August 25, 2009 7:49:47 PM

No offense, but the true shame is that some people out there WANT to "hop up" their systems but are unwilling to learn ...... yes I said unwilling. They are looking for that instant gratification. For those people there are boutique builders like Alienware and Falcon Northwest. Just throw the money at them and they will build you a fast box.

As far as the cooperation in the community I still remember all the snubbing that I went through from the Linux community years ago when I first started.

There is a learning curve to overclocking and you must at least know some of the basics. Without the basics all you have is want, and that my friend is not enough. You have to at least understand how it works. You cannot teach a Monkey to overclock.

If you go through these forums and at least attempt to understand then you should easily be able to increase the stock speeds by 10 to 20% in a lot of cases but remember that there are entirely too many variables to offer what you ask here.

Perhaps you could start compiling a database of the information that you suggest. I am certain that if you look hard enough you could possibly find every configuration out there among the billions of web pages.
August 26, 2009 3:27:56 PM

To each chip his own.

As good as the central database could be, I could only imagine the number of people that would post:

"OMFG, why the hell couldn't my E5200 reach 4GHz when it is also an R0 like the other 3 guys?!?!?!?"
a c 197 K Overclocking
August 26, 2009 8:38:11 PM

amnotanoobie said:
To each chip his own.

As good as the central database could be, I could only imagine the number of people that would post:

"OMFG, why the hell couldn't my E5200 reach 4GHz when it is also an R0 like the other 3 guys?!?!?!?"

Just the question I would ask. I can get mine to only 3.76 GHz.
August 26, 2009 9:00:23 PM

But perhaps they might find an alternate setting which allows them to achieve 3.95GHz or 3.8GHz which does work!
a b K Overclocking
August 26, 2009 10:25:46 PM

+1 for jsc and shabaa. Well said.

Quote:
But perhaps they might find an alternate setting which allows them to achieve 3.95GHz or 3.8GHz which does work!

80-85% of the people who "want" to OC NEVER READ the stickys. What makes you think they will search a DATABASE that's 10-20x larger than a guide? Much less, they can't even use GOOGLE!!!
a c 197 K Overclocking
August 27, 2009 4:33:36 AM

Sigh. :( 

Sometimes I think that using an unlocked BIOS should require a license requiring a technical competency test. :D 
a b K Overclocking
August 27, 2009 5:53:45 AM

I think shadow said it best. If they can't learn the process, or read a simple sticky, they are far more likely to blow up their chip then search through a massive database looking for what their avg should be. Your talking about recording the chip, stepping, batch number, motherboard with revision, bios, ram, ram settings, voltages for everything involved, case, fans, CPU heatsink, etc. Who would really search all that?
August 27, 2009 5:55:59 AM

Hi dear friends,
Thanks for sharing BIOS information.
How can you change BIOS registration information ?
If you have an idea, Please share with us.
August 27, 2009 8:38:33 AM

I think perhaps I should withdraw this question

-not because I don't think it is a good idea

-not because those less technical might be directed to the database with a few simple general instructions on how to search for the right information and how to adapt it if their computer specifications are not identical and enter it into their computers, and perhaps learn a little about overclocking without blowing their machines to kingdom come

-not because I think it might be a good way for techie overclockers to record the various steps of their overclocking efforts for posterity and perhaps gain bragging rights for their particular rig (and rigs evolve so one might achieve a slightly better overclock with a new type of cooling or a change of memory or a new motherboard)

-not because a techie might find such a resource as useful as a novice by allowing them to select the best combination of components and purchase those components and granted the same model cpu from different batches may not always perform identically, but the information in such a resource might easily yield dozens if not hundreds of potential combinations settings which might take weeks to discover manually but yield a few useful groups of settings for testing.

-not because not everyone wants to break the idiot barrier by overclocking a cpu so high it's so fast it runs backwards in time! or requires a dedicated nuclear reactor to power it. Perhaps some people wish to achieve a modest to substantial increase in performance without excessively increasing the power and heat profile of the CPU.

-Not because the tiny effort of entering your own achievements into a database for others to examine and confirm might give your effort some measure of validity and in doing so by enabling the population of the world the ability to improve the performance of their machines you are infact helping people, reducing (or at least delaying) the amount of old equipment that is dumped in tips, but you are sticking that little used middle digit up at Intel as Intels sales of new CPU's starts to tumble dramatically and it is forced to drop prices to compensate!

but perhaps because most people who have commented here and elsewhere have demonstrated why they should be locked in the most isolated place on this planet and left with all the technical equipment they could every desire but with little else.

Carved on the door would be the epitaph - "Here lies the anonymous overclockers of the world - a dying breed, as their achievements and dedication lie forgotton because the articles the may if they could even be bothered have written got deleted because they were considered redundant a few weeks or months later and no one really nows or cares what they did."

For those who have or are willing to help and consider such an idea thankyou from the bottom of my heart. It seemed to work for hard disks and a few other components on this site. I hope they do one for CPU's and overclocking.
August 27, 2009 9:01:57 AM

Shadow703793 said:
+1 for jsc and shabaa. Well said.

Quote:
But perhaps they might find an alternate setting which allows them to achieve 3.95GHz or 3.8GHz which does work!

80-85% of the people who "want" to OC NEVER READ the stickys. What makes you think they will search a DATABASE that's 10-20x larger than a guide? Much less, they WON"T even use GOOGLE!!!

There, fixed it for you...
August 27, 2009 9:15:21 AM

jwoollis said:
I think perhaps I should withdraw this question

-not because I don't think it is a good idea

-not because those less technical might be directed to the database with a few simple general instructions on how to search for the right information and how to adapt it if their computer specifications are not identical and enter it into their computers, and perhaps learn a little about overclocking without blowing their machines to kingdom come

-not because I think it might be a good way for techie overclockers to record the various steps of their overclocking efforts for posterity and perhaps gain bragging rights for their particular rig (and rigs evolve so one might achieve a slightly better overclock with a new type of cooling or a change of memory or a new motherboard)

-not because a techie might find such a resource as useful as a novice by allowing them to select the best combination of components and purchase those components and granted the same model cpu from different batches may not always perform identically, but the information in such a resource might easily yield dozens if not hundreds of potential combinations settings which might take weeks to discover manually but yield a few useful groups of settings for testing.

-not because not everyone wants to break the idiot barrier by overclocking a cpu so high it's so fast it runs backwards in time! or requires a dedicated nuclear reactor to power it. Perhaps some people wish to achieve a modest to substantial increase in performance without excessively increasing the power and heat profile of the CPU.

-Not because the tiny effort of entering your own achievements into a database for others to examine and confirm might give your effort some measure of validity and in doing so by enabling the population of the world the ability to improve the performance of their machines you are infact helping people, reducing (or at least delaying) the amount of old equipment that is dumped in tips, but you are sticking that little used middle digit up at Intel as Intels sales of new CPU's starts to tumble dramatically and it is forced to drop prices to compensate!

but perhaps because most people who have commented here and elsewhere have demonstrated why they should be locked in the most isolated place on this planet and left with all the technical equipment they could every desire but with little else.

Carved on the door would be the epitaph - "Here lies the anonymous overclockers of the world - a dying breed, as their achievements and dedication lie forgotton because the articles the may if they could even be bothered have written got deleted because they were considered redundant a few weeks or months later and no one really nows or cares what they did."

For those who have or are willing to help and consider such an idea thankyou from the bottom of my heart. It seemed to work for hard disks and a few other components on this site. I hope they do one for CPU's and overclocking.


Asking TH to do what you are suggesting is very like asking 'how long is a piece of string'. I am sure that if a poster came here with a specific question, like 'I have this build and a q6600, how do I overclock it?' then they'd get pretty good answers and some directions to some pretty good guides. But there are just too many variables, as most others have mentioned, to make a viable database. Think of all the variables for a minute... MB, BIOS, RAM, case, fans, and many others. Why don't you start off with something easy? Like a database of red-heads...

So, before you come here and start denigrating the community, put some thought into what you are suggesting.
August 27, 2009 9:32:22 AM

+1 to jsc, shabaa, and Shadow703793

For the OP, there's no reason to compile all of them for the good of those who don't want to learn. There are already lots of materials/articles out there about overclocking and all you need to do is point your browser to your favorite search engine and type the keywords.

e.g. Tom's had one for AMD cpus.
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/phenom-overclock-at...

It may not be the exact cpu + hardware that you use but the main idea behind overclocking is there.
a b K Overclocking
August 27, 2009 11:47:38 AM

I would have been happy to keep talking about this, but seeing as the OP feels that way, F off and have a nice day. If you want this database so bad, have fun building it. Perhaps then you'll understand what we were trying to say.
August 27, 2009 3:14:22 PM

jwoollis said:

-not because I don't think it is a good idea

It is a good idea, you'll just be amazed at how stupid people could get. That was why lmgtfy was created, as some were simply too lazy or stupid or both.

jwoollis said:

...and perhaps learn a little about overclocking without blowing their machines to kingdom come

With stupid people anything is possible. Heck manufacturers even advertise and give people the simplest utilities to OC but some simply refuse to read and know more. (They go here and post half a sentence and expect the rest of us to know everything)

jwoollis said:

-not because I think it might be a good way for techie overclockers to record the various steps of their overclocking efforts for posterity and perhaps gain bragging rights for their particular rig (and rigs evolve so one might achieve a slightly better overclock with a new type of cooling or a change of memory or a new motherboard)

There's already a lot of bragging going on on forums, I don't see the database changing that anytime soon.

jwoollis said:

Carved on the door would be the epitaph - "Here lies the anonymous overclockers of the world - a dying breed, as their achievements and dedication lie forgotton because the articles the may if they could even be bothered have written got deleted because they were considered redundant a few weeks or months later and no one really nows or cares what they did."

I think anonymous overclockers aren't anywhere near endangered, heck I'm still here :p . The extreme overclockers actually are more important (for me), as I think they show what is possible, given that they would ideally have the best tools and components.

Again, the database is not really a bad idea, it's just that the world is not ready for it. (And I could imagine the flood of stupid questions)
a b K Overclocking
September 1, 2009 6:43:15 AM

I dont see how such a database could be set up to be useful as there are too many factors. Everything from the CPU and GPU bios version, what cards are in what slots, what brand and timing of memory, what model of CPU cooler, paste, what case with fans installed where, what is the ambient room temperature, how steady is the buildings power supply?

I also see a trend of manufacturers making easy bios and cpu overclocking utilities that will let newbies get decent overclocks in complete safety.

Anyone wanting more than that should learn what they are doing and spend the time doing it right so they dont damage their components or end up unhappy with mildly unstable systems.
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