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My i5 build

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September 6, 2009 10:23:29 PM

Just finished my budget i5 750 build as follows:

CPU: i5 750 base clock @ 150 MHz for mild 3 GHz (3.15 GHz turbo) overclock.

Memory: 2x Kingston ValueRam 2GB 1333MHz DDR3 @ 1.5V
Note Intel states that you can’t use RAM that needs more than 1.65 volts, typical of high performance memory.

MB: MSI P55-CD53 a bit limited but supports Intel SATA Raid.

The CPU, MB and memory came as a bundle for around US$500.

HDD: 2x Seagate Barracuda 7200.12 500GB in Raid 0
GPU: Nvidia stock 9600GT (don’t laugh I already had one)

OS: Windows 7 Home Ultimate tested in both 32 and 64 bit versions

Results:

3DMark06 Windows 7 32 bit
GPU 11335 CPU 4296

3DMark06 Windows 7 64 bit
GPU 11330 CPU 4302

Nice step up from my old Pentium 540!

More about : build

September 6, 2009 10:33:46 PM

You ordered this already? The i5 is hasn't been released to sell yet ?
Why did you use turbo overclock, that's noobie. Also, that video card is funny, I guess you do not play much games?
September 6, 2009 10:40:21 PM

The i5 has been for sale in NZ for more than two weeks. I got mine last Firsday and built the rig over the weekend. This was a budget build ... had to make do with the GPU I had for the moment.

Related resources
September 6, 2009 10:45:28 PM

How much was the final build man? What's NZ?
I just searched on the sites like newegg..and others and cant find it.
The release date for i5 750 says september 8th on google..
and that's a great stepup from pentium 540 lol, you not gaming?
September 6, 2009 11:05:46 PM

Quote:
Go for 4Ghz :) 


I doubt it overclocks like the i7 920, you probably need to overvolt a lot for i5 750. 4GHZ on air will be quite hot anyways and there will not be much of a difference maybe no difference at all in performance in games opposing 3.6-3.8ghz
September 6, 2009 11:09:07 PM

NZ = New Zealand, it's a country. Part of the great alliance of five English-speaking countries (Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States) but I reckon that Intel thinks we're part of Asia so we get stuff early.

I'm using the stock Intel cooler and temps get to 73 deg C when running wPime 1024M accross all 4 cores. Takes 332 seconds but I'll need a better heatsink to go much past 3.15 GHz. Psychosaydie, yes I've heard of 4GHz on air out of China or Taiwan...
September 6, 2009 11:12:17 PM

haha i knew NZ= new zealand but i thought you were referring to an online store, so then i mentioned newegg..etc..
im surprised it's released in NZ because it says sept 8th release date. weird

too bad i dnt know any 1156 socket coolers..
September 6, 2009 11:22:25 PM

Also on the turbo mode well that's built into the i5 chip. The i5 750 runs at 20x base clock and jumps by iteself to 21x if the CPU is not too hot and it's busy. So at idle it runs at around x9 (1.35 GHz) steps up to 20x (3GHz for small jobs) and then jumps to 21x (3.15 GHz) when you really give it something to do.

What puzzels me slightlty is that the QPI link clock shows as 2.7 GHz in CPU-Z 1.52.2 but shows up as 5.4 GHz in the MSI BIOS. Still it's early days for the i5 and the MSI BIOS is like Rev 1.0!

Plenty of places in NZ selling the i5, like there are 60 prices listed here:

http://www.pricespy.co.nz/pno_16226.html
September 6, 2009 11:42:38 PM

what the..the price is so high, i read somewhere the i5 750 should only be around 200 dollars. USD, maybe cuz of new zealand currency (just did some conversion, the price is around that in nz dollar lol), damn that sucks for you guys

i might go for the i5 750 over the i7 920, we'll see some good reviews about it in these weeks. but buying the i7 920 will future proof more i guess, not that much more money spent overall i guess
September 7, 2009 12:04:59 AM

Those Pricespy prices are in NZ dollars. To get US dollars you need to multiply by the exchage rate. So typical prices on that list are in the range US$255 to US$265 retail.

The trade prices for i5/i7 here are:

i5 750 US$255
i7 920 US$315
i7 860 US$342
i7 950 US$652
i7 870 US$672
i7 975 US$1,232

Most stores here sell the CPU real close to trade price and make their money other other associated items.

I serioulsy considered the i7 860 but the i7 mobos are really expensive compared to the i5 units. If you look around the benchmarks you'll see the i5 is able to run pretty close to the i7 920 anyway. Given how few games and things seem to be multi-threaded all the extra CPU threads are really not going to help much yet.

And when they do ... there will be new drool worthy Intel silicon for sale anyway!

Check out:

http://incrysis.com/forums/viewtopic.php?id=28859

http://namegt.tistory.com/224



September 7, 2009 12:28:28 AM

3.78 GHz man this is looking too easy.

OK so with stock cooler and stock volts, it's running at 180MHz base that's 3.6 GHz (and 3.78 GHz on the x21 turbo). Temps are sitting at 57 deg C max with just Core Temp and CPU-Z running.

Running wPrime 1024M pushed things up to 75 deg C which might be a bit much.

I'll leave it to idle over lunch and see if it's still stable.
September 7, 2009 1:04:29 AM

There ya go OK at 4.020 GHz here it is:



Still stock volts and HS ...

a b à CPUs
September 7, 2009 2:09:23 AM

Thanks for sharing your new i5 with us.

I've updated i7 Turbo which is a good program to monitor the multiplier on these new CPUs.

http://www.fileden.com/files/2008/3/3/1794507/Turbo.zip

The Core i5 750 has 4 bins of turbo boost available when running single threaded tasks if you enable C3/C6 in the bios and your motherboard properly supports this feature. On the previous socket 1366 boards, most of them limited you to a +1 turbo boost as soon as the BCLK was raised. The 1156 boards might have a similar limitation. These are looking like a nice alternative to the socket 775 45nm Quads.
September 7, 2009 3:14:09 AM

Hi unclewebb, thanks for the utility and the BIOS hint. Here is what I've found:



Now the MSI BIOS had no specific C3/C6 enable, however there was a 'Intel C-State' Enable/Disable function that defaults to Disable. Enabling that and CPU-Z showed rare jumps to x24 (3.6 GHz in my case) but it was not sustained even with a single threaded task. It would jump to x24 at the start of the task then settled back to x21.

Going back to the BIOS again there was an associated 'OverSpeed Protection' Enable/Disable function that defaults to Enable. Disabling that and my CPU was happy to sit at x24 for a single threaded application but wouldn't hold that for multi threaded applications (in my example I used wPrime which allows you to set the number of threads to be used).

Your utility would not record the x24 mult being used in the Max box, always topping out to x21. Perhaps I've not understood this bit it properly?

However the individual thread boxes showed average rates approaching x24 for two threads (I would have only expected 1, but it looks like the Windows 7 scheduler is tossing the one thread accross two cores thus giving the approx 50% loading on each core).


And just for Psychosaysdie here is a final insanity:



Like, this is my work desktop ... at stock ... and in my best Chief Engineer Scotty voice "We need more cooling Captian!"
September 7, 2009 4:11:16 AM

jy_nz said:
The i5 has been for sale in NZ for more than two weeks. I got mine last Firsday and built the rig over the weekend. This was a budget build ... had to make do with the GPU I had for the moment.



this is a load of crap and hes lying, Im from NMZ and the Core i5 has an international release date, hes talkign through a hole in his a$$, I retail hardware in NZ he did NOT get this early, it arrived with the NZ supplier yesterday!

Stop lying you fool
September 7, 2009 4:21:54 AM



Enough said?
September 7, 2009 4:34:59 AM

HAHA nice screenshot of the bill man that owned his ass but im still pretty surprised it got released so early in NZ. You should of erased the full address for security reasons, there's a lot of weird people here, they might be able to track you down and rape you lol..

Damn, I've never knew that the i5 750 is such a great overclocker..I'm so jealous and you making me wanting to get this so bad, at over 4.0ghz with stock cooler and voltage thats amazing. Maybe you just a lucky guy with a good sample of the chip. Who knows. sigh.
edit somethings wrong here man: you said stock voltage, the first pic is 1.112vcore for 4.020ghz and then its 1.320vcore for 3.6ghz and then 1.344vcore for 4.3ghz

is there any good 1156 coolers out there. am also waiting for some good reviews on the i5 750 vs i7 920 overclocking articles. then ill decide which to buy
September 7, 2009 4:54:27 AM

Well it shouldn't be about owning anyone’s ass .... This is about Overclocking!

There are tons of retailers selling i5 in NZ as the retail poster would know if he rang around the Pricespy list I posted earlier. Hell, you can buy them on Trade Me (the NZ equivalent of eBay). By the way as a courtesy to retailers out there I should point out that the image above is from a well know NZ trade supplier and reflects prices available to large corporate buyers. Hobby users should not expect these prices if you are only buying a few bits retail, YMMV. The guy behind the counter has to make something to cover all those ‘interesting’ retail questions! Anyway how does Mr Ashton think you fake up pictures so easily? Unclewebb posted details of his i7 Turbo program and I posted an image of it on my system an hour later. Have to be a magician to Photoshop that…

On your subject of heat sinks – no I’ve not found anything yet. As you probably know the LGA1336 socket heat sink push pins are on 80mm centres whereas the LGA1156 has 75mm centres. So it would look like you might be able to fudge a water block mounting by drilling or filing elongated holes in the water block mountings. Might just need to wait for manufacturers to introduce LGA1156 mounting kits as with this kind of overcooking there’s going to be demand.

By the way I’m actually the second person in our company to run up an i5, the other guy got his two weeks ago! So we're learing fast.
September 7, 2009 5:33:12 AM

hey maybe you didnt see the edit i posted but here it is

edit somethings wrong here man: you said stock voltage, the first pic is 1.112vcore for 4.020ghz and then 2nd pic its 1.320vcore for 3.6ghz and then 3rd pic 1.344vcore for 4.3ghz

i just read some articles that the i5s were released in china in august..lol im in canada..its still not released same with US
also they did 4.4ghz with stock cooler, this i5 750 is driving me nuts.
Cheaper FASTER HOW COULD THIS BE LOL
September 7, 2009 5:57:47 AM

By stock volts I mean that I didn't change the mother board BIOS settings.

However the CPU itself can vary the applied voltage by altering its 6 bit VID output over a 64 step range (VID = voltage identification). The VID output is connected to the multi-phase power supply system on the mobo. Dr MOS in MSI speak.

Have a read of this item:

http://en.expreview.com/2009/08/19/thorough-review-of-i...

and note comments on page 11.

Also Intel states in:

http://download.intel.com/design/processor/datashts/320...

"The voltage set by the VID signals is the reference voltage regulator output voltage to
be delivered to the processor VCC pins. VID signals are CMOS push/pull drivers. Refer
to Table 2-15 for the DC specifications for these signals. The VID codes will change due
to temperature and/or current load changes in order to minimize the power of the part
.
A voltage range is provided in Table 2-7. The specifications have been set such that one
voltage regulator can operate with all supported frequencies."

Note the comment that the VID codes are changed by the CPU according to load (my italics). Although this pdf is for the i7 it is much the same for the i5, so I understand.

Also have a look at the sticky 'Core i7 and Core 2 Temperature Guide' - by CompuTronix in this forum.
September 7, 2009 6:05:34 AM

wPrime multi core or what? 32M or 1024M
September 7, 2009 6:09:58 AM

Yes I found the forum...

Let's see what we can do. This is at my standard working overclock - like I started this whole thread at.



Now I know this is at 150 MHz base - I need to run it up again tomorrow. But please not that the high OC are clearly going to be limited by the cooling.
September 7, 2009 6:23:53 AM

OK see above but tIme to head home more tomorrow!
September 7, 2009 6:29:58 AM

you didnt have to type all that, you could of just said you left the voltage at Auto.

Also why is it at 3.1ghz(last pic) i thought ur overclock is at over 4ghz or you reach 4.3ghz just enough for a screenshot but will crash with prime95?
have you ran prime95 or any other stress programs for at least an hour testin?

there is no HT on i5 750 right?
September 7, 2009 9:22:26 AM

overshocks said:
HAHA nice screenshot of the bill man that owned his ass but im still pretty surprised it got released so early in NZ. You should of erased the full address for security reasons, there's a lot of weird people here, they might be able to track you down and rape you lol..

Damn, I've never knew that the i5 750 is such a great overclocker..I'm so jealous and you making me wanting to get this so bad, at over 4.0ghz with stock cooler and voltage thats amazing. Maybe you just a lucky guy with a good sample of the chip. Who knows. sigh.
edit somethings wrong here man: you said stock voltage, the first pic is 1.112vcore for 4.020ghz and then its 1.320vcore for 3.6ghz and then 1.344vcore for 4.3ghz

is there any good 1156 coolers out there. am also waiting for some good reviews on the i5 750 vs i7 920 overclocking articles. then ill decide which to buy


Well then techpac are in a whole heap of trouble this was to be released for shipping today, congrats you just got them in trouble with intel
a b à CPUs
September 7, 2009 4:40:07 PM

jy_nz: i7 Turbo seems to be working correctly and will give you the most accurate look at your multiplier. This tool also works on Core 2 CPUs.

Your screen shot shows that you are running a single threaded task which is being mostly shared between the two center cores. The two outside cores are in charge of running any background tasks while this is going on.

On a Core i5 750, you will get a 24 multiplier but you only get this when 1 core is active. The two center cores are taking turns as the active core while the two outside cores are spending most of their time asleep.

I don't have the official specs yet but I'll post a utility that you can use to confirm your CPU's capabilities in a moment.

As soon as 2 cores are active, your CPU will no longer be able to use the 24X multiplier. When all 4 cores are active, your maximum multiplier is 21. The Load Filter setting in i7 Turbo limits the data going into the Min and Max boxes. In your screen shot you have this set to 95% (the default) so it is recording the min and max multiplier only when your load is over 95%. If you change this filter to 0%, then all data will be considered for the Min and Max statistics. That's why it is only showing 21.000 because at full load, greater than 95%, that's all this CPU can do.

The 23.733 and 23.829 values for the two center cores are a very accurate average of the multipliers for those two cores during the previous 1 second interval. What is constantly happening is a core is trying to run at the maximum 24 multiplier but any background activity while you are benching kicks the multiplier down to a lower value. It might drop all the way down to 21 when two cores are active or it might drop only to 23 or 22. The multiplier on these CPUs will constantly be cycling like this, hundreds of times a second, based on load. CPU-Z rounds the multiplier off which may or may not be 100% accurate.

i7 Turbo is based on the Intel Turbo White Paper. It compares two high performance timers within the CPU to accurately calculate the average multiplier during an interval. This is the method that Intel recommends for CPUs that support Intel Dynamic Acceleration like some of the Core 2 mobile chips or Intel Turbo Boost which Core i9/i7/i5/i3 CPUs use.

Enabling C-States or C3/C6 allows the cores that are not doing the work to enter the sleep state and become inactive. The maximum multiplier available is based on how many active cores you have. The fewer cores active, the more bins of turbo boost will be available to you.

Model Specific Register (MSR) 0x1AD contains information about how many bins of turbo boost are available. My tool will show the specs for when 4, 3, 2 and 1 core is active. The 4 numbers will be side by side and are in hexadecimal format.

http://www.fileden.com/files/2008/3/3/1794507/MSR1AD.zi...

When 4 cores are active, we know the maximum is 21 and when 1 core is active, we know the maximum is 24. I'm just not sure about what the two center values are for this CPU.

24 decimal translates to 18 in hex and 21 decimal translates to 15 so you should see something like:

15 __ __ 18

What do the two center numbers show?

This tool also works on the previous Core i7 CPUs.

Edit: Next time you are running wPrime, include Core Temp and i7 Turbo. The reported temperature looks like the two center cores are doing most of the work. When playing around you can also go into the Task Manager and right click on a task and use Set Affinity... to lock it to a particular core or cores. Hyper PI is another good testing utility that lets you run 1 to 4 instances of SuperPI. When running a single thread of SuperPI, it automatically locks it to one core.
September 7, 2009 6:34:35 PM

unclewebb, thanks for the info. I know previous processors use core 0 and core 1 as the main loading(quad cores), but in this case the i5 750 loads more with the center cores, if i read correctly and understood. Correct me if I'm wrong. So in this theory wouldn't the center cores be the hottest for the i5 750? It seems so in the OP's pics.

So it seems that Intel changed their technology around..seeing how quad cores are hottest on first two cores, but now its center for i5..not sure about i7 can't remember

This thread has become very interesting umm..
a b à CPUs
September 7, 2009 9:42:00 PM

A long time ago, some software used to always ask for core 0 but more software is multi threaded aware these days so it just asks to run on a generic core and ends up on whatever core Microsoft or Intel gives it.

In this one particular example, it appears that the work load got handled by the two center cores and they shared it fairly equally but I don't think this will always be the case. The load can be scheduled on different cores hundreds of times a second so most software is only giving you a snapshot at that one instance in time.

The Core i7 - 9xx series worked very similar to this when the motherboard properly supported this feature. Unfortunately, when overclocking, most motherboards limited turbo boost to +1 no matter how many cores were active. It's great to see this new P55 board doing this right even when he's overclocking and allowing access to the full +4 turbo boost that the i5 750 is capable of.

rge over on XtremeSystems did some testing of his Core i7 - 950. These have a default multiplier of 23 and are capable of either 1 or 2 bins of turbo boost, just like an i7-920 is. When 2, 3 or 4 cores are active, you get a maximum of +1 and when only one core is active you can get a +2 turbo boost which on a 950 is equal to a maximum of 25X.

Here's a screen shot of a 950 running a single thread.



You can see that at this particular instance, most of the load is locked to one thread which is allowing the multiplier for that thread to approach 25 similar to what this i5 is doing.

I don't know if the CPU chooses a particular core when it discovers a task that is running continuously like a benchmark or if a task that starts running on a particular core stays mostly on that same core until it is completed.

This new i5 is looking like a hell of a new low cost CPU. If you can run single threaded tasks with the multiplier spending most of its time at 24 while the BCLK is up at 180, you're going to have a very fast computer for the majority of tasks. It will be interesting to find out how many bins of turbo boost you get when 2 cores are active. Of course, running it locked at 4.2 GHz (21 X 200) would be a lot of fun too. With adequate cooling you should be able to get similar clocks out of one of these compared to an i7-9xx. This i5 doesn't have hyper threading and is a more efficient design so with less heat output, clocking one up into the low 4 GHz range should be pretty much standard for any serious enthusiast.

Edit: Interestingly, when Super PI was locked to the first thread using Task Manager, it was not able to use the 25 multiplier as much. This seems to show that letting the CPU manage tasks itself might be the best thing to do.

September 7, 2009 11:24:23 PM

A bench mark to start - single threaded Super PI 32M, 9 minutes and 49.6 seconds of overclocking goodness at 4.2 GHz with resaonable temps:







Then a question for unclewebb:



Note still stable with a bunch of programs open at 4.2 GHz, up one MHz base clock step from the above Super PI run.

Even with the Load FIlter threshold dropped down to 50% I don't seem to be recording the Max Min numbers.

By the way I loaded up your MSR 0x1AD tool as you can see.

A not to viewers from [H]ard|Forum - no cliams being made here other than what's stated. As pointed out in past postings we're still thermal limited by the Intel cooler.
September 8, 2009 12:10:32 AM

my i5 750. had it since last thursday (im from Australia)

is sitting at 3.6ghz stock volts and stock cooling and maxed out at 72deg on all cores in prime 95. wasnt prime stable at 3.6 on stock vcore though. but was prime 95 stable at 3.4ghz

i will shoot for 4ghz prime stable on stock cooling tonight. (will need a little more volts to be stable though)

I will try to update this.

theres a difference between "stable with programs open" and stable under stress testing.

Still this clock just owns overclocking. stock i got 24XXX 3d marks (3d mark 05) with a gtx275. and overclocking to 3.4 i got over 26XXX and about 27000 cpu marks
September 8, 2009 12:26:41 AM

unclewebb - thank you for a great discussion and for access to your utilities.

Psychosaysdie - thanks for the encouragement.

slickncghia - if you run into problems with high base clocks you might want to look at dropping your DRAM or QPI clock multipliers. I'm running the machine fine 24x7 at the 150 MHz base and if that is OK for a week I'll crank it up another notch or two.

heapssickaye - yep same here, can't understand how people can get their knickers in a knot when the processors have been on Trade Me, eBay, Fry's Electronics (famously), a whole bunch of NZ retailers, and every computer store in Singapore!

As for non disclosure agreements (NDAs), these are individual contracts signed between the disclosing party (Intel) and the receiving party. If you signed one you'll know when it expires ... if you didn't sign one you’re not bound by contract.

Oh, and one more thing ... I mentioend that a mate had the same build except his system has 8GB with all 4 DRAM slots filled. He is seeing essentailly the same numbers.
September 8, 2009 12:30:02 AM

just realised you didnt keep it at stock volts... that makes me feel better. i was prime95 stable at 3.4ghz at 1.1vcore.

i was away all weekend and have only played with it a little bit. theese chips have HEAPS of OC headroom. i think we are going to see some huge numbers on air. maybe 5ghz+ from good coolers
September 8, 2009 12:33:23 AM

slickncghia - the CPU volts are on auto so they're managed by the CPU. You can play with then in the BIOS but I've not done that yet.
September 8, 2009 12:42:27 AM

cheers mate ill give that a try.

auto volts worry me a bit. i always thing they will go too high and fry it. when you are set on your clocks. start manually bumping it down till its as low as possible but still stable.

you are doing well with that ram btw. what latency are you running?

im running 4gig patriot viper 1600 7-7-7-20.

it dosent like sitting on 1600 but just under is fine. hopefully i can get it close to 1600 when im done with the clocks or maybe even tighten it up more?
a b à CPUs
September 8, 2009 3:32:03 AM

MSR 0x1AD shows the maximum amount of turbo boost available. Your CPU shows 15 15 18 18. These numbers are in hexadecimal so converted to decimal they are:

21 21 24 24

This means that:

When 3 or 4 cores are active you get a maximum multiplier of 21.
When 1 or 2 cores are active you get a maximum multiplier of 24.

That is what your i5 750 is capable of and it's up to the motherboard to support this feature. It looks like your MSI is doing this correctly, even when overclocking the BCLK.

When running a single threaded task like a Super PI benchmark, the multiplier should be mostly at 24. If there are some background tasks and 2 cores are active, it should still try and use the 24 multiplier. Only when there are more than 2 cores active will it drop down to 21.

In your previous screen shot where it showed the hardest working core at an average of 23.829, that means that this core was using the 24 multiplier 94.3% of the time and the 21 multiplier 5.7% of the time.

If you're not sure about i7 Turbo, drop the Load Filter down to 0% and then all data should start showing up in the Min and Max boxes. If the Load Filter is at 50% and nothing is showing up in Min and Max then that is because your average load has not exceeded 50%. You need to put a load on that CPU.

Here's another simple testing tool.

http://www.fileden.com/files/2008/3/3/1794507/LoadTeste...

It allows you to put a gradual load on your CPU from 0 to 100%. You can run 4 instances of this program so that you can load each core in a controlled manner and then you can watch what happens to your multiplier. As the load goes up, your average multiplier should go down. You can also run HyperPI which I think I mentioned before. This is a GUI that lets you run 1 to 4 instances of SuperPI at the same time. This will also let you see how your CPU responds to various loads and how stable it is. That's what all the sharks here are waiting to see. :) 
September 8, 2009 4:03:43 AM

Slickncghia

I wouldn't worry about auto volts for the moment. All it means is that the mother board is obeying the Intel VID outputs from the CPU. In other words a stock set up. That’s what I mean when I say stock anyway. Have a read back up this thread for more info.

A lot of people don’t get how VID works. You’ll see lots of question on forums like “what volts are you running?” or “what’s VID?”.

Put simply the Intel CPU usually knows what’s best for it. Clever logic in the chip evaluates loads, temperatures, and timing requirements to establish what voltage it requires. The mother board voltage regulator takes power from your power supply and steps it down to suit the CPU.

The output voltage of this mother board regulator is set by the VID bits output by the CPU. Typical mother board voltage capability range from 1.6V down to 0.5V, although the CPU will probably only operate over a subset of that range. For example the i7 datasheet (I don’t have an i5 sheet yet) spec’s the maximum permissible core voltage as 1.55V.

Sure enough when I examine the CPU voltage under a variety of loads the voltage swings between a low of 0.94V at idle up to 1.44V (for altec).

The MSI BIOs does not seem to allow the CPU voltage setting to be taken off AUTO. This might be a restriction of the REV 1.0 BIOS or there may be a cunning setting somewhere else that needs to be enabled first. In any case at the moment I’m leaving it a stock (that’s ‘stock VID controlled’ for the pedantic).

By the way Intel sepc’s the maximum DRAM voltage at 1.875V with a typical of 1.5V so the usual ‘performance’ DDR3 voltage of 1.9V is out. Your stuff looks OK at 1.65V.

My DRAM is running at the default settings of 1302 MHz 9-9-9-24.

The cheap Kingston value DDR3 sepc’s are:

JEDEC #1 6.0-6-6-17-23 @ 457 MHz
JEDEC #2 7.0-7-7-20-27 @ 533 MHz
JEDEC #3 8.0-8-8-22-31 @ 609 MHz
JEDEC #4 9.0-9-9-25-34 @ 685 MHz


Unclewebb

Your attention has been a real help. Thanks for the turbo boost info – very interesting, particularly the possible of two cores operating at x24. We’ll have to sus that out more carefully. As you know wPrime can be set from 1 to 4 threads, it was 1024M with 4 threads at x20 and 3.6 GHz that got things to the 75 deg C quoted earlier.

Thanks for the load tool it working but I don’t have time to play with it at the moment. And thanks for the tip about Hyper PI, hope for a change to test later tonight.
September 8, 2009 4:16:35 AM

jy_nz said:

By the way Intel sepc’s the maximum DRAM voltage at 1.875V with a typical of 1.5V so the usual ‘performance’ DDR3 voltage of 1.9V is out. Your stuff looks OK at 1.65V.




hmmm that got me a little worried. as my stuff is 1.9v
http://www.patriotmemory.com/products/detailp.jsp?prodl...

when i was buying it i asked around to make sure the voltage wasnt too high and no-one said a thing.

have you got any more information on this?

cheers mate
Ben
September 8, 2009 4:31:38 AM

Anyway what voltage is it actually running at?
September 8, 2009 4:37:50 AM

your link dosent work for me but mine does.

its 7-7-7-20 at 1.9v

but yeah ill check tonight what volts its actually running at.

why is the dram voltage limited to 1.875? cpu? mobo?

this might explain why its not stable at the full 1600

edit: sorry to hijack btw :p 
September 8, 2009 5:10:40 AM

slickncghia said:
your link dosent work for me but mine does.

its 7-7-7-20 at 1.9v

but yeah ill check tonight what volts its actually running at.

why is the dram voltage limited to 1.875? cpu? mobo?

this might explain why its not stable at the full 1600

edit: sorry to hijack btw :p 


JEDEC ddr3 standards allow a max dcv of 1.95, so your modules are within specs. Might check what your MB supports voltage-wise.
a b à CPUs
September 8, 2009 5:42:54 AM

I was curious to see how these new CPUs compare to the previous Core 2 so I ran a couple of Super PI benches on my E8400 at 4000 MHz and 4250 MHz for comparison:





I think a Q9550/Q9650 will need to run at close to 4.5 GHz to be competitive with this new i5 750. I can't wait to see an i5 running with a decent cooler or water.
September 8, 2009 5:45:32 AM

jy_nz said:
Well that's not what Intel thinks:

http://www.anandtech.com/cpuchipsets/Intel/showdoc.aspx...

And previously touched on here:

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/G.Skill-memory-DDR3,65...

Special memory released by others including Corsair:

http://www.techpowerup.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1021...


***, why didnt anyone warn me when i asked...

and why are they making ddr3 that wont work with the chips that most people will use ddr3 at???

i guess i will just set the mobo dram voltage to 1.65 and i might have to loosen up the timings for higher speeds at lower volts? does that sound about right
September 8, 2009 5:52:17 AM

unclewebb said:
I was curious to see how these new CPUs compare to the previous Core 2 so I ran a couple of Super PI benches on my E8400 at 4000 MHz and 4250 MHz for comparison:

http://img134.imageshack.us/img134/6242/superpie84004000mhz.png

http://img134.imageshack.us/img134/1308/superpie84004250mhz.png

I think a Q9550/Q9650 will need to run at close to 4.5 GHz to be competitive with this new i5 750. I can't wait to see an i5 running with a decent cooler or water.


what are your scores? i cant see the pic/

Ill run superpi tonight as a comparisson if you would like
September 8, 2009 5:56:07 AM

jy_nz said:
Well that's not what Intel thinks:

http://www.anandtech.com/cpuchipsets/Intel/showdoc.aspx...

And previously touched on here:

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/G.Skill-memory-DDR3,65...

Special memory released by others including Corsair:

http://www.techpowerup.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1021...


Not wanting to start an argument, I just quoted the max vdc in the JEDEC ddr3 standards. MB mfg's are allowed to use, underuse, or abuse the standards as they see fit. There are no standards police, yet, to my knowledge. The min vdc, from memory, is .09vdc.
September 8, 2009 6:19:22 AM

so undervolt the ram?
a b à CPUs
September 8, 2009 6:37:34 AM

E8400 4000 MHz DDR2-1000 CL 5-5-5-18
SuperPI 4M - 1m 05.770s

E8400 4250 MHz DDR2-1000 CL 5-5-5-18
SuperPI 4M - 1m 02.790s

The i5 750 already has me beat.
Tom's has a full i5/i7 review up and not surprisingly, they like these new CPUs too.
September 8, 2009 8:09:19 AM

uncleweb

From HardOCP's 'official' first review of the new i5s:

"If you are first and foremost a gamer and an overclocker, the Core i5-750 makes every other solution look like wasted money."


slickncghia

Don't fret too much as the mother board will probably limit your DRAM voltage and your DRAM will work fine at 1.5V but maybe not with 7-7-7-20 timing. Just might need to play with the available settings.

This i5 stuff is all so new that even today MSI announced an BIOS upgrade from 1.0 to 1.1 on a mother board they still don't list on their web site. BTW you didn't mention you mobo?


crock

Noted. Didn't wish to offend, after all the full Intel Core i5-700 datasheet has only just become publicly available.
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