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Windows 7 Boot Times with Velociraptor

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December 17, 2009 4:07:51 PM

What kind of boot times are you guys seeing running windows 7 64 bit with a velociraptor? This is my first system build and everything but the HD speeds seem to be stellar. Also is there another good way to test it to see if I am getting what I should be? Oh, and the "Windows Experience Index" came up as a 5.4 for the HD.

EDIT The work computer I am on now which is just an off the shelf HP has a "Windows Experience Index" of 5.9 for the HD

SPECS

Intel i7 820 processor
Asus P7P55D Deluxe Motherboard
XFX ATI Radeon HD770 Graphics Card
300GB WD Velociraptor
4 GB Corsair DDR3 1666mHz
Cooler Master CM690 Tower
Ultra 650 Watt Power Supply


Thanks.
a b G Storage
December 17, 2009 4:53:16 PM

I have a new Athlon II X3 running Windows 7 64bit, 4 gigs and a seagate 500 gig drive. From post to useable desktop is about 40 - 45 seconds. I know it's not a raptor, just to give you an idea.
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December 17, 2009 6:18:57 PM

That is definitely faster than what I am seeing. What would cause the drive to run slow?
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a b G Storage
December 17, 2009 6:52:47 PM

1kbuild said:
That is definitely faster than what I am seeing. What would cause the drive to run slow?
There may be devices enabled in the BIOS that are slowing down boot times. For example; the serial and parallel ports, floppy seek, boot other devices, or verify the boot order. Basically, you want to disable any options and devices in the BIOS that you are not using and that have no impact on system performance. The less devices the BIOS sequence needs to verify and check, the faster the boot times.

When it comes to boot order, unless you have specific need to boot from a CD/DVD ROM, then you can make your OS hard drive the first boot device. That change in of itself will shave several seconds off the boot sequence.

Lastly, a regularly defragged hard drive also can speed up boot times...

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December 17, 2009 7:17:36 PM

chunkymonster said:
There may be devices enabled in the BIOS that are slowing down boot times. For example; the serial and parallel ports, floppy seek, boot other devices, or verify the boot order. Basically, you want to disable any options and devices in the BIOS that you are not using and that have no impact on system performance. The less devices the BIOS sequence needs to verify and check, the faster the boot times.

When it comes to boot order, unless you have specific need to boot from a CD/DVD ROM, then you can make your OS hard drive the first boot device. That change in of itself will shave several seconds off the boot sequence.

Lastly, a regularly defragged hard drive also can speed up boot times...



Thank you for the tips! However it also seems slow for other tasks such as opening files and installs when the processor is not even breaking a sweat and I'm using about a 4th of the available memory. Is there a good way to actually test the transfer rate I am getting?
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a b G Storage
December 17, 2009 8:13:19 PM

1kbuild said:
Is there a good way to actually test the transfer rate I am getting?
Check out HD-Tach. You can run some tests and then use the built in database to compare to other drives and RAID configs.

Good luck!
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December 17, 2009 9:35:40 PM

chunkymonster said:
Check out HD-Tach. You can run some tests and then use the built in database to compare to other drives and RAID configs.

Good luck!



Awesome thanks much!
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a b G Storage
December 18, 2009 1:37:37 AM

chunkymonster said:
There may be devices enabled in the BIOS that are slowing down boot times. For example; the serial and parallel ports, floppy seek, boot other devices, or verify the boot order. Basically, you want to disable any options and devices in the BIOS that you are not using and that have no impact on system performance. The less devices the BIOS sequence needs to verify and check, the faster the boot times.

When it comes to boot order, unless you have specific need to boot from a CD/DVD ROM, then you can make your OS hard drive the first boot device. That change in of itself will shave several seconds off the boot sequence.

Lastly, a regularly defragged hard drive also can speed up boot times...


Just to add to that, defragmenting the HDD will help boot times but normal defragmention won't it must be a safe mode or even better a boot time defragmentation. This is becuase the OS cannot defragment itself while its in operation, if its in the operation, it means that processes, services, and driver aswell as core OS are being accessed and loaded so thereby can't be defragged. IN safe mode, since only core OS files than most other processes and services can be defragged and in boot time defrag, the entire OS can be defragged giving a real difference in boot time.
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