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quick question about using a jumper for testing

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October 5, 2008 12:59:37 AM

Hello everyone,

I have a quick question regarding using a jumper to test for an operational power supply.

I am using a corsair 620hx for my power supply in my build. I completed the build last night, got everything to work. I loaded the OS and other programs that I use. I even had the chance to game for about 30 minutes. Feeling tired, I decide to do the memory and stress testing the next day so I turn off the computer and go to bed. This morning I wake up and my computer does not turn on. Then I begin to troubleshoot. I was able to post with one stick of ram, checked the voltages and deemed everything to be fine at this point. So then I put in the second stick or ram and the motherboard does not turn on(some lights on the motherboard are active when I turn on the power supply switch, but nothing else when I actually hit the motherboard power button. I Then start over again with just the power supply, motherboard(reset), the stick of ram that was definitely working, cpu/fan/heatsink. At this point everything is out of the case. To my dismay my motherboard does not go on when I hit the mobo power button. I don't know what to do at this point, I have already taken out the mobo battery for 30 minutes and replaced to no avail. So I then decide to test the power supply using a jumper made from a paper clip and some electrical tape. Bad news for me, the power supply fan does not turn on when I use the jumper, which would indicate a faulty psu to the best of my knowledge. Unfortunately, I do not have another computer or power supply to test, which is why I resorted to using a jumper for testing purposes

Have I missed something? Perhaps a bad method using a paper clip as a jumper? Should I just RMA the PSU? Please advise, thanks in advance.

Aloha,
Veekz
October 5, 2008 1:18:02 AM

Try plugging in a hard drive and a fan to the PSU and see if that helps. You don't need the HD plugged into the mobo.
October 5, 2008 1:51:50 AM

Zorg said:
Try plugging in a hard drive and a fan to the PSU and see if that helps. You don't need the HD plugged into the mobo.


OK, I did that and neither turn on.
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October 5, 2008 2:27:34 AM

silly me, i just checked the corsair website and i am using the correct method. of course, if anyone has suggestions then i'm all ears.

now if i may ask, which would it be better to do an rma with corsair or zzf?

again, thanks in advance.
October 5, 2008 4:32:52 AM

They must employ an internal dummy load. I imagine that is becoming more common.

I haven't needed to return anything to ZZF. If it is pretty new I would call them and see what they say. I believe Corsair is pretty good, but I haven;t had to deal with them either. Sorry I don't have more concrete information for you.
October 6, 2008 6:14:25 AM

Thanks Zorg. I've submitted an RMA request online to ZZF and I will call them on the next business day.
October 6, 2008 9:07:27 AM

Good luck with it, that is a good PSU.
!