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Is my Q6600 running too hot ?

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September 29, 2009 8:56:41 PM

I have been running Prime 95 on my STOCK Q6600 and I´m feel like I´m getting too hot temps. I would really appreciate a second opinion on this, since I´m thinking about re-positioning the heatsink.


As I said the CPU is stock.. no OC (but I´m planning to do it so thats why im worried now). I have an antec nine hundred and an AC Freezer 7 Pro.


Room temperature is 26-27ºC (I´m in Spain):






Thank you for your time !

More about : q6600 running hot

September 29, 2009 9:12:52 PM

Your temps are fine; a little hot for my liking, but they are within the range for that cpu. Your cpu can go up to 73 C per manufacturer spec.
September 29, 2009 9:33:33 PM

Thank you pepperman. So its not likely to be some not well-applied heat paste ??
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September 29, 2009 9:45:13 PM

what's your heatsink? if it's stock, those numbers look pretty typical, if only a bit lower than expected since your ambient (26 C! boy that's hot) is a little high.
September 30, 2009 5:12:31 AM

I'd say your temps look a bit warm. You're running at stock speeds with an aftermarket cooler, you temps should be better.

You idle temps look great, you delta from idle to load seems a bit much. However that being said your temperatures are WELL within being too hot. Nothing to worry about.
September 30, 2009 1:46:55 PM

Thank you very much guys !

Pepperman, the cooler as mentioned is Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro


I´ll take it easy with OCing then... see how it hot it goes...



Thanks again (and of course, any other comments will be welcome)
September 30, 2009 1:47:50 PM

Thanks MRFS, I´ll take a look at that (I just saw your post after writting the previous one) !!
September 30, 2009 3:23:35 PM

You could try reseating it if you have extra paste; it might take your temps down a couple of degrees, and it might be worth it depending on how much OCing you want to do.
September 30, 2009 5:49:23 PM

You are right ! I´ve been going through AC´s manual again, and those comments on newegg, and I´ve realished I might have done something really stupid when setting it up: using the thermal paste (Arctic Silver)... in addition to the compound that was already on the heatsink (since it had a different texture and I knew even less then about all these things) !!!

I will clean it, and reset it using only the arctic silver! (yes, I have more of it :) 


a b K Overclocking
September 30, 2009 7:50:49 PM

LOL, yea it comes with paste already applied so that wasn't necessary.

Remember not to use too much when you re-seat it, small grain of rice, or a small pea is all you should need.
a b K Overclocking
October 1, 2009 3:03:45 AM

doctor lo said:
I have been running Prime 95 on my STOCK Q6600 and I´m feel like I´m getting too hot temps ... I have an antec nine hundred and an AC Freezer 7 Pro ... Room temperature is 26-27ºC ...
The ACF7 Pro is a solid mid-range cooler which is OK for a Dual Core, but it's inadequate for a Quad Core, which instead requires a high-end cooler.
pepperman said:
Your temps are fine; a little hot for my liking, but they are within the range for that cpu ...
Agreed.
pepperman said:
... Your cpu can go up to 73 C per manufacturer spec.

To which temperature are you refering; CPU or Core? There's a difference. Either way, Intel's Thermal Specification for the Q6600 G0 is not 73c. The correct information is available right here on Tom's Forums in the Overclocking | Intel Stickies, and on Intel's website, both of which are linked below.

Guys, let's not speculate about processor temperatures. Temperatures are all about specification, so it's very importent to be specific, otherwise temperatures make about as much sense as comparing apples to oranges thermal fruit salad in a blender! For everyone's benefit, I am posting the following information. My objective is to assure that enthusiasts understand Intel's specifications, standards and test methods, so they can better decide how to apply and manage their overclocking options.

From Intel's Processor Spec Finder - http://processorfinder.intel.com/details.aspx?sSpec=SLA...

Q6x00 G0 variants:

Vcore Max 1.5v
Tcase Max (CPU temperature) 71c
Tjunction (Core temperature) 76c

From the Core i7 and Core 2 Temperature Guide - http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/221745-29-sticky-core...


"Section 1: Introduction

Core i and Core 2 processors have 2 different types of temperature sensors; a CPU case (not computer case) Thermal Diode centered under the Cores, and Digital Thermal Sensors located on each Core. The case Thermal Diode measures Tcase (Temperature case), which is CPU temperature, and the Digital Thermal Sensors measure Tjunction (Temperature junction), which is Core temperature. Since these sensors measure 2 distinct thermal levels, there is a 5c temperature difference between them, which is Tcase to Tjunction Gradient. Core i7’s / i5’s and Core 2 Quad’s have 1 Tcase and 4 Tjunction sensors, while Core 2 Duo's have 1 Tcase and 2 Tjunction sensors ...

... The monitoring utilities provided by motherboard manufacturers monitor CPU temperature, while some popular freeware utilities monitor Core temperatures ... Real Temp ... is recommended for users interested in monitoring Core temperatures only ... SpeedFan monitors Tcase (CPU temperature) and Tjunction (Core temperature) ... "


The Thermal Specification shown in Intel's Processor Spec Finder is Tcase Max (CPU) not Tjunction (Core), which is a very common misconception among most enthusiasts. Since there's a 5c gradient between the CPU sensor and the Core sensors, (shown in the following Intel document) - http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/0709/0709.1861.pdf - just add 5c to the value shown in the Spec Finder to determine the corresponding Core temperature, which is 76c for the Q6x00 G0.

Intel's second and frequently misunderstood Thermal Specification, Tjunction Max, (100c for the Q6x00 G0 variants) applies to overtemp protection such as Throttle and Shutdown, so you don't toast your transistors. As such, any Q6x00 G0 temperatures which exceed 76c should be considered "overtemp". Further, when specifications are exceeded, then processor degradation becomes a concern, which is explained in the following AnandTech article - http://anandtech.com/cpuchipsets/intel/showdoc.aspx?i=3...

Prime95 Small FFT's is the Standard for processor thermal testing, because it's a steady-state 100% workload which yields steady-state temperatures, whereas Blend is a memory cyclic workload which yields fluctuating processor temperatures. Small FFT's will reach 97% thermal saturation within 7 to 8 minutes, so a 10 minute test is adequate. Thermal testing should be conducted as close as possible to 22c (72f) Standard ambient, with case covers removed, the computer clear of any desk enclosures, and all fans at 100% RPM to eliminate cooling variables, and to produce consistent and repeatable results for comparisons. If the Gradient between CPU temperature and "mean" (average) Core temperature is not ~ 5c, then BIOS is incorrectly coded. CPU temperature and Core temperatures can be individually calibrated in SpeedFan by following the Calibrations Section in the Temperature Guide.

OCCT and Burn Test (reminiscent of TAT) use LinPack, which shows thermal signatures that resemble the ups and downs of a bad day on the stock market, and cycle between light workloads, through test segments which spray all processor registers with all one's, (100% thermal load, which equates to 115% workload), and can push an overclocked Q6x00 G0 at Vcore Max 1.5 right on past Tcase Max! :o 

Since there are very few applications or games that will spike, let alone sustain processor workloads beyond 70% to 85%, utilities which load all registers with all one's are not representative of real-world computing. While these utilities are certainly very useful for stability testing, they are inappropriate for thermal testing. The 3DMark benches are excellent for stability testing, as are applications for ripping and encoding.

The best anaolgy to make sense of CPU temperature and Core temperature is to compare them to a 4 cylinder car that has 5 temperature guages; 4 of the 5 guages are cyclinder head temperatures (closest to the heat source), and the 5th guage is the overall engine temperature, which is 5c lower than the other 4 guages, and is the temperature guage with which we're all familiar. We know that red-line for the Q6x00 G0 is 71c (Tcase Max) on the engine temp guage and 76c (Tjunction) on the cylinder head temp guages, but if we push the engine too hard and peg all the guages, (95c Tcase overtemp / 100c Tjunction Max) then the engine will shut down.

If you'd like to learn more about processor temperatures, then just click on the link in my signature.

Hope this helps,

Comp :sol: 

October 1, 2009 3:38:32 PM

I meant 71 C; I apologize, I must have miss-typed it.
October 4, 2009 10:13:45 PM

CompuTronix said:
[...]



I doubt I could get a more detailed and well-explained reply. Really appreciate it.

I had read the temperature guides.. and I had also been using realtemp for a while, and asking about calibration in their forums. Pretty much the conclusion was that after adjusting TJ Max in cores 2 and 3.. and doing some cool down test, it wasnt that neccesary to do any further calibration.. since the results seemed to be quite consistent (both cooling down and heating up). I was also satisfied.. and didnt find them too optimistic, so I considered the measures on the safe side.


CompuTronix said:
The ACF7 Pro is a solid mid-range cooler which is OK for a Dual Core, but it's inadequate for a Quad Core, which instead requires a high-end cooler.



So one good solution would be to upgrade..... I could get an OCZ Vendetta 2, for around 30€ (shipping included) which is a good price here. Would that be enough ??? Sunbeam or Xigmatec are 40€ + and harder to find... but possible.



Anyway, I´ve just cleaned and re-set the thermal grease, and the results are better. I´m posting them next, including some SHOCKING pics :D 



Thanks once again.
October 4, 2009 10:29:24 PM

Since I was a bit unsure about how I had applied the thermal grease back the days (it was a year ago more or less when I bought the PC), I decided to re-apply..... and then I found what could be another reason for my high temps (be ready for this):



So I obviously cleaned it... and re-applied the thermal paste (arctic silver). Temps have gone down a good 5º - 7º C which I think its really good (but once again, comments are welcome).



Here are the results:



I´ve done the test several times for half an hour or so (including small FFT´s test). The maximun temp any core reaches is 55, going down to 54, 53 or even 52 later during the test.


So my plan is to slowly overclock.. making sure I never reach 65ºC. I don´t want heavy OCing... so maybe my cooling would be enough ?? I´ll post results when I have them.


October 4, 2009 10:43:56 PM

It's hard to tell from your pic, but where is the fan pulling air from? If that's a vent to the outside, you're fine, but if it's the psu, you should rotate your heatsink so it pulls air from the inside of the case, and pushes it towards the fan on the left.

Otherwise, that plan should work. You might even get a decent overclock out of it if you can get away without raising voltage.
October 5, 2009 12:53:36 AM

pepperman said:
It's hard to tell from your pic, but where is the fan pulling air from? If that's a vent to the outside, you're fine, but if it's the psu, you should rotate your heatsink so it pulls air from the inside of the case, and pushes it towards the fan on the left.

Otherwise, that plan should work. You might even get a decent overclock out of it if you can get away without raising voltage.



Yes... the "top" of the photo is the top of the of the board. So the air is going up; since its an antec nine hundred there is a big fan on the top of the case pulling the air out, so its allright.
a b K Overclocking
October 7, 2009 10:53:01 AM

Good catch, Doc. Well there it is! Proof once again that performing quarterly "planned maintenance" inspections, or better known as "PM's" can prevent such things from causing problems.
a b K Overclocking
October 7, 2009 12:45:39 PM

And I thought my system was dusty.
October 8, 2009 1:16:18 AM

Hahaha, And that has been in less than a year !!! the rest of it is more or less clean.. but I guess I have to take care of it more often
!