Dell OEM Windows XP

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Earlier this morning I posted a similar message in a different NG but
haven't received any replies. Maybe it wasn't the best group to post in; so
I thought I'd try here.

I'm in the process of assembling everything I need for an socket 939 build.
This morning I saw these OS CDs on Pricewatch, Amazon redirect and
elsewhere - sometimes as
HP/Compaq - for around $50. These are presented as full OEM versions w/o COA
but fully legitimate versions of Windows that can be used for a clean
install on any machine.

Has anyone ever purchased one of these? Are they really legitimate? How do
these vendor's obtain these and sell them so cheap? I understand that there
are no manuals, support, etc.. but are they still eligible for updates under
MS new verification scheme?

TIA,

Wayne
12 answers Last reply
More about dell windows
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Do not purchase a manufacturer's custom OEM Windows XP CD!
    It will not allow you to activate the license since the license will
    only activate on the manufacturer's own PC. Also, a CD sold without
    the COA is totally worthless and considered illegal. If you wish to purchase
    an OEM version, then you should only purchase a generic
    Microsoft Windows XP CD which includes the proper license to install
    and activate Windows XP.

    Examples:

    Microsoft Windows XP HOME Edition With Service Pack 2 - OEM
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16837102151

    Microsoft Windows XP Pro with SP2 Upgrade Software
    http://www2.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=37-116-192&DEPA=8

    --
    Carey Frisch
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows XP - Shell/User
    Microsoft Newsgroups

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    "WayneM" wrote:

    | Earlier this morning I posted a similar message in a different NG but
    | haven't received any replies. Maybe it wasn't the best group to post in; so
    | I thought I'd try here.
    |
    | I'm in the process of assembling everything I need for an socket 939 build.
    | This morning I saw these OS CDs on Pricewatch, Amazon redirect and
    | elsewhere - sometimes as
    | HP/Compaq - for around $50. These are presented as full OEM versions w/o COA
    | but fully legitimate versions of Windows that can be used for a clean
    | install on any machine.
    |
    | Has anyone ever purchased one of these? Are they really legitimate? How do
    | these vendor's obtain these and sell them so cheap? I understand that there
    | are no manuals, support, etc.. but are they still eligible for updates under
    | MS new verification scheme?
    |
    | TIA,
    |
    | Wayne
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    "WayneM" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
    news:uQIqjyXrFHA.3852@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > Earlier this morning I posted a similar message in a different NG but
    > haven't received any replies. Maybe it wasn't the best group to post in;
    > so I thought I'd try here.
    >
    > I'm in the process of assembling everything I need for an socket 939
    > build. This morning I saw these OS CDs on Pricewatch, Amazon redirect and
    > elsewhere - sometimes as
    > HP/Compaq - for around $50. These are presented as full OEM versions w/o
    > COA
    > but fully legitimate versions of Windows that can be used for a clean
    > install on any machine.
    >
    > Has anyone ever purchased one of these? Are they really legitimate? How do
    > these vendor's obtain these and sell them so cheap? I understand that
    > there
    > are no manuals, support, etc.. but are they still eligible for updates
    > under
    > MS new verification scheme?
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > Wayne
    >
    >

    Considering that HP doesn't give theist customers full oem CDs with the
    computers, it makes it pretty obvious that the HP cads aren't "real." The
    Dells probably aren't going to be real either. And if either were real,
    you'd run into issues with activation, if not installation. Many oem cads
    are bios-locked, so they won't install on anything except the original
    motherboard.

    Let's put it this way: it's a lot easier to silkscreen a manufacturer's logo
    onto a fake cd than it is to try to create a hologram like the ones on the
    generic oem cads (although I've seen some pretty good fakes).

    The other problem is "without coal." Without that key, you aren't going to
    be able to install. Or are they saying the key is on the CD or something?
    Good luck with that. It may work when you install, but updates are another
    issue.
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    On Tue, 30 Aug 2005 12:05:21 -0400, WayneM wrote:

    > These are presented as full OEM versions w/o COA

    Shop around more. If you want the savings of an OEM XP and can live with
    the restrictions of the OEM licensing, find a generic OEM CD that includes
    the COA and product key. Usually have to buy some PC hardware to be able to
    purchase these.

    --
    Sharon F
    MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    WayneM wrote:
    > Earlier this morning I posted a similar message in a different NG but
    > haven't received any replies. Maybe it wasn't the best group to post in; so
    > I thought I'd try here.
    >
    > I'm in the process of assembling everything I need for an socket 939 build.
    > This morning I saw these OS CDs on Pricewatch, Amazon redirect and
    > elsewhere - sometimes as
    > HP/Compaq - for around $50. These are presented as full OEM versions w/o COA
    > but fully legitimate versions of Windows that can be used for a clean
    > install on any machine.
    >
    > Has anyone ever purchased one of these? Are they really legitimate? How do
    > these vendor's obtain these and sell them so cheap? I understand that there
    > are no manuals, support, etc.. but are they still eligible for updates under
    > MS new verification scheme?
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > Wayne

    It IS NOT LEGITIMATE without the COA!

    Either buy an OEM version of Windows XP WITH a COA with your motherboard
    from the same retailer or buy the boxed Full Windows XP from a software
    retailer.
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    "WayneM" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
    news:uQIqjyXrFHA.3852@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > Earlier this morning I posted a similar message in a different NG but
    > haven't received any replies. Maybe it wasn't the best group to post in;
    so
    > I thought I'd try here.
    >
    > I'm in the process of assembling everything I need for an socket 939
    build.
    > This morning I saw these OS CDs on Pricewatch, Amazon redirect and
    > elsewhere - sometimes as
    > HP/Compaq - for around $50. These are presented as full OEM versions w/o
    COA
    > but fully legitimate versions of Windows that can be used for a clean
    > install on any machine.
    >
    > Has anyone ever purchased one of these? Are they really legitimate? How do
    > these vendor's obtain these and sell them so cheap? I understand that
    there
    > are no manuals, support, etc.. but are they still eligible for updates
    under
    > MS new verification scheme?
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > Wayne

    Many of the Dell OS CDs I have seen require the presence of a Dell
    identifier in the BIOS to be used. That is, if you try to use them on a
    non-Dell system, a message appears that they are for Dell-branded systems
    only and will not proceed.

    Consequently, unless you're comfortable copying, editing and re-burning BIOS
    chips, this may not be the best way to go.

    HTH
    -pk
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Thanx for all the info.

    I'll most likely use an OEM XP. I'm comfortable working inside a computer
    and, although it has been awhile, I'm confident in my ability to assemble
    the components but I'm not interested in trying to manipulate the BIOS.
    Also, I'm not interested in 'pirating', hacking, or anything else illegal.

    I have a retail 98se from a old KII build that has never been upgrade ( the
    machine is used occasionally at a summer home ); so I think I could use an
    Upgrade XP version. I read somewhere that you can use an Upgrade version for
    a clean install by just swapping the retail 98se disc at the prompt.
    However, I can't find that info now; so I'm not sure if this is correct.

    Wayne


    "Patrick Keenan" <test@dev.null> wrote in message
    news:xc1Re.2847$884.440267@news20.bellglobal.com...
    > "WayneM" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
    > news:uQIqjyXrFHA.3852@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >> Earlier this morning I posted a similar message in a different NG but
    >> haven't received any replies. Maybe it wasn't the best group to post in;
    > so
    >> I thought I'd try here.
    >>
    >> I'm in the process of assembling everything I need for an socket 939
    > build.
    >> This morning I saw these OS CDs on Pricewatch, Amazon redirect and
    >> elsewhere - sometimes as
    >> HP/Compaq - for around $50. These are presented as full OEM versions w/o
    > COA
    >> but fully legitimate versions of Windows that can be used for a clean
    >> install on any machine.
    >>
    >> Has anyone ever purchased one of these? Are they really legitimate? How
    >> do
    >> these vendor's obtain these and sell them so cheap? I understand that
    > there
    >> are no manuals, support, etc.. but are they still eligible for updates
    > under
    >> MS new verification scheme?
    >>
    >> TIA,
    >>
    >> Wayne
    >
    > Many of the Dell OS CDs I have seen require the presence of a Dell
    > identifier in the BIOS to be used. That is, if you try to use them on a
    > non-Dell system, a message appears that they are for Dell-branded systems
    > only and will not proceed.
    >
    > Consequently, unless you're comfortable copying, editing and re-burning
    > BIOS
    > chips, this may not be the best way to go.
    >
    > HTH
    > -pk
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:elICAeZrFHA.1032@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl,
    WayneM <me@privacy.net> typed:

    > Thanx for all the info.
    >
    > I'll most likely use an OEM XP. I'm comfortable working inside
    > a
    > computer and, although it has been awhile, I'm confident in my
    > ability to assemble the components but I'm not interested in
    > trying
    > to manipulate the BIOS. Also, I'm not interested in 'pirating',
    > hacking, or anything else illegal.
    > I have a retail 98se from a old KII build that has never been
    > upgrade
    > ( the machine is used occasionally at a summer home ); so I
    > think I
    > could use an Upgrade XP version.


    Yes. You may find that an Upgrade version doesn't cost that much
    more than a legitimate generic OEM version, and since unlike the
    OEM version, it can later be moved to another machine, you may
    prefer that.


    > I read somewhere that you can use an
    > Upgrade version for a clean install by just swapping the retail
    > 98se
    > disc at the prompt. However, I can't find that info now; so I'm
    > not
    > sure if this is correct.


    Yes, that's correct. The requirement to use an upgrade version is
    to *own* a previous qualifying version's installation CD, not to
    have it installed. When setup doesn't find a previous qualifying
    version installed, it will prompt you to insert its CD as proof
    of ownership. Just insert the previous version's CD, and follow
    the prompts. Everything proceeds quite normally and quite
    legitimately.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    WayneM wrote:
    > Earlier this morning I posted a similar message in a different NG but
    > haven't received any replies. Maybe it wasn't the best group to post in; so
    > I thought I'd try here.
    >
    > I'm in the process of assembling everything I need for an socket 939 build.
    > This morning I saw these OS CDs on Pricewatch, Amazon redirect and
    > elsewhere - sometimes as
    > HP/Compaq - for around $50. These are presented as full OEM versions w/o COA
    > but fully legitimate versions of Windows that can be used for a clean
    > install on any machine.
    >


    That would be a lie. If there is no CoA, there is no license.
    Further, branded OEM CDs can be legitimately (and very often
    technically, due to BIOS-locking) installed *only* on the specific make
    and model computer with which they were originally sold. Such licenses
    cannot legitimately be resold, unless the entire computer is part of the
    deal.


    > Has anyone ever purchased one of these?


    Yes, there are a lot of gullible and uninformed people in the world.
    Fortunately, you possess the good sense to ask before making such a mistake.

    > Are they really legitimate?


    No, not even close.


    > How do
    > these vendor's obtain these and sell them so cheap?


    Because they're deliberately selling stolen goods. They know they
    can't expect to get full value for such merchandise.


    >I understand that there
    > are no manuals, support, etc.. but are they still eligible for updates under
    > MS new verification scheme?
    >


    Very probably not, even if you could get one of them to install.
    Microsoft has tightened the activation process for OEM versions,
    precisely because of the so-called "vendors" to which you're alluding.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    WayneM wrote:
    > Thanx for all the info.
    >
    > I'll most likely use an OEM XP. I'm comfortable working inside a computer
    > and, although it has been awhile, I'm confident in my ability to assemble
    > the components but I'm not interested in trying to manipulate the BIOS.
    > Also, I'm not interested in 'pirating', hacking, or anything else illegal.
    >
    > I have a retail 98se from a old KII build that has never been upgrade ( the
    > machine is used occasionally at a summer home ); so I think I could use an
    > Upgrade XP version. I read somewhere that you can use an Upgrade version for
    > a clean install by just swapping the retail 98se disc at the prompt.
    > However, I can't find that info now; so I'm not sure if this is correct.
    >
    > Wayne


    It's quite possible to perform a clean installation using the
    Upgrade CD, provided you have the true installation CD for the earlier
    OS.

    Simply boot from the WinXP Upgrade CD. You'll be offered the
    opportunity to delete, create, and format partitions as part of the
    installation process. The Upgrade CD checks to see if a qualifying OS
    is installed, and, if it finds none, it asks you to insert the
    installation media (CD) of that OS. Unfortunately, an OEM
    "Recovery/Restore" CD will not work for this purpose; you must have a
    true installation CD, complete with the "\Win98" folder and *.cab
    files, or the "\i386" folder of WinNT/2K.

    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    ~ FreeSpirit ~ wrote:

    > "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    > news:OaYqgzcrFHA.240@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    >> In news:eyEAWZcrFHA.1724@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl,
    >> ~ FreeSpirit ~ <spammenot@nospam.net> typed:
    >>
    >>> "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    >>> news:esA$dsarFHA.3016@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >>>> In news:elICAeZrFHA.1032@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl,
    >>>
    >>>> Yes, that's correct. The requirement to use an upgrade version is
    >>>> to *own* a previous qualifying version's installation CD, not to
    >>>> have it installed. When setup doesn't find a previous qualifying
    >>>> version installed, it will prompt you to insert its CD as proof of
    >>>> ownership.
    >>>
    >>> ## What do those of us who get 3 (or more) CDs from our PC's mfg.
    >>> do? How do we know which of the 3 CDs to insert in the drive? I
    >>> ask this because we're considering upgrading our HP 900/98SE to
    >>> XP-Home.
    >>
    >>
    >> For more information, please post back with the exact titles of each
    >> of those three or more CDs.
    > ==============================
    > 1. HP Pavilion System Recovery Disk 1 of 3. For distribution only
    > with an HP Pavilion.
    > This CD contains a backup of all software.... blah blah...
    >
    > 2. HP Pavilion System Recovery Disk 2 of 3. For distribution only
    > with an HP Pavilion.
    > This CD contains a backup of all software.... etc. etc... same as
    > disk 1.
    > HP Pavilion *Application* Recovery Disk 3 of 3. For distribution
    > only with an HP Pavilion.
    > This CD contains a backup of all software.... blah blah... same as
    > disk 1 and 2.


    Is this to to use as qualifying media to clean install an upgrade version of
    XP?

    If so, none of your CDs will work. You need an installation CD, not a
    recovery CD.

    However you can also do a clean installation with your OEM recovery CD
    number 1. It's more complicated, but it *can* be done. First restore from
    the recovery CD. Then run the XP upgrade CD from within that restored
    system, and change from Upgrade to New Install. When it asks where, press
    Esc to delete the partition and start over.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:OCiM$pEsFHA.1252@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl,
    ~ FreeSpirit ~ <spammenot@nospam.net> typed:

    > "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    > news:ukVn4Z9rFHA.912@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...


    >> If so, none of your CDs will work. You need an installation
    >> CD, not a
    >> recovery CD.
    >
    > ## Where would I get an installation CD? The PC is about 4
    > years
    > old now.


    You'd have to buy one, regardless of the age of the PC. If the
    manufacturer doesn't supply one, he doesn't. Personally, I would
    never choose to buy a computer that didn't come with one.

    But alternatively you could use the alternative procedure I
    described below.


    >> However you can also do a clean installation with your OEM
    >> recovery
    >> CD number 1. It's more complicated, but it *can* be done.
    >> First
    >> restore from the recovery CD.
    >
    > ## We already did that when we couldn't get rid of some
    > malware. It
    > takes the 3 CDs to reinstall it to where it's usable, it
    > doesn't
    > complete the reinstall of W98 until the last CD is copied.
    >
    > Then run the XP upgrade CD from within that restored
    >> system,
    >
    > ## What do you mean from "within" the restored system? You
    > mean put
    > the XP upgrade CD in the drive and see what it says?


    I mean put the CD in and run from it while running Windows. As
    opposed to the normal way of installing, by booting from the CD.


    >> and change from Upgrade to New Install. When it asks where,
    >> press
    >> Esc to delete the partition and start over.
    >
    > ## To the XP CD will ask if I want to do a New Install or an
    > Upgrade? ???? What partition?


    The existing partition.


    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:OOtgHzLsFHA.2880@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl,
    ~ FreeSpirit ~ <spammenot@nospam.net> typed:

    > "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    > news:OBwW8EKsFHA.2996@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    >> In news:OCiM$pEsFHA.1252@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl,
    >> ~ FreeSpirit ~ <spammenot@nospam.net> typed:
    >>
    >>> "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in
    >>> message
    >>> news:ukVn4Z9rFHA.912@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    >>
    >>
    >>>> If so, none of your CDs will work. You need an installation
    >>>> CD,
    >>>> not a recovery CD.
    >>>
    >>> ## Where would I get an installation CD? The PC is about 4
    >>> years
    >>> old now.
    >
    >> You'd have to buy one, regardless of the age of the PC. If the
    >> manufacturer doesn't supply one, he doesn't. Personally, I
    >> would
    >> never choose to buy a computer that didn't come with one.
    >
    > ## None of the PC mfg's give you the MS CD anymore.


    Not true. I can't speak for them all, but at aleast some do. The
    ones who do tend to be the smaller mom-and-pop store, rather than
    the big nationwide ones, but they do exist.


    > Now you even
    > have to burn your own *recovery* CDs and you can only do it one
    > time.
    > I had to supply my own CDs with THIS HP PC.
    >
    >> But alternatively you could use the alternative procedure I
    >> described
    >> below.
    >
    >>
    >>>> However you can also do a clean installation with your OEM
    >>>> recovery
    >>>> CD number 1. It's more complicated, but it *can* be done.
    >>>> First
    >>>> restore from the recovery CD.
    >
    >>> ## We already did that when we couldn't get rid of some
    >>> malware. It
    >>> takes the 3 CDs to reinstall it to where it's usable, it
    >>> doesn't
    >>> complete the reinstall of W98 until the last CD is copied.
    >>>
    >>> Then run the XP upgrade CD from within that restored
    >>>> system,
    >>>
    >>> ## What do you mean from "within" the restored system? You
    >>> mean put
    >>> the XP upgrade CD in the drive and see what it says?
    >
    >> I mean put the CD in and run from it while running Windows. As
    >> opposed to the normal way of installing, by booting from the
    >> CD.
    >
    > ## Oh, I see.
    >
    >>>> and change from Upgrade to New Install. When it asks where,
    >>>> press
    >>>> Esc to delete the partition and start over.
    >
    >>> ## To the XP CD will ask if I want to do a New Install or an
    >>> Upgrade? ???? What partition?
    >
    >> The existing partition.
    >
    > ## I don't know what that means. I have a backup copy of
    > XP-Home/Sp1 on my HD. Is that a partition?


    Not literally, but for this purpose probably close enough. You
    probably have a single partition, C:, on your hard drive.

    I don't mean to be insulting, but you seem like a relative
    beginner. Rathre than run the risk of getting yourself in trouble
    doing this yourself, you might want to enlist the help of a more
    experienced friend.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
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