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How do i explain what the cpu and Gpu does to customers?

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  • CPUs
  • GPUs
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Last response: in CPUs
October 18, 2008 4:23:53 PM

I got a job at Circuit City and work the computer, Games, Software department. I start working November 1st, for only $7.50 an hour.

I dont know how to really describe the Cpu and Gpu for customers who no nothing about computers. The only thing i can think of to tell them is:
"The cpu is what processes all of the information, The Gpu processes all of the graphics and physics such as when your playing a game or movie everything you see comes from the Gpu, The faster the Gpu the higher you can turn the settings on games and the higher the resolution you can play them on is balanced on how fast and how much Vram it has"

Thats pretty much all i can come up with to describe it to customers, But does anyone know how to tell a customer whats the point of a faster cpu?

Can anyone offer suggestions? I kinda want to impress the manager so i can stay after Christmas and be a full time employee :D  .

More about : explain cpu gpu customers

October 18, 2008 4:30:56 PM

It seems like you already know what to tell them for the most part. CPU processes information and the gpu processes videos and games. Though working at Circuit City it's going to be more important to your job to explain to someone why they need the $100 HDMI cable instead of the one that produces the exact same picture that cost $2-5 online.
October 18, 2008 4:31:33 PM

i was just in ur place at best buy last year. This is my suggestion: most people know NOTHING about computers, so the more info you give them the more confused they will be. keep it to a minimum. For example, tell them that the cpu is like a brain, it processes all information. the faster the cpu the faster it can "think". Same for the GPU. The faster the card the faster it can process 3d apps.

Just keep it simple and don't use technical words.
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October 18, 2008 4:42:50 PM

lol @ san pedro, yeah things cost a fortune at circuit city.

Thanks shoota that is dually noted, ill try to keep that in mind.
October 18, 2008 4:51:41 PM

Way too much information.

The faster CPU and GPU makes you cooler when you talk to your friends.

That's all they need to know. :lol: 

I'm sure you will do fine. Just remember KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid).

Too much detail will confuse them and they will leave.

Ask them what they want to do and then pick the computer for them.
October 18, 2008 4:57:33 PM

San Pedro said:
It seems like you already know what to tell them for the most part. CPU processes information and the gpu processes videos and games. Though working at Circuit City it's going to be more important to your job to explain to someone why they need the $100 HDMI cable instead of the one that produces the exact same picture that cost $2-5 online.


lol. My guess is that will be the very first thing they teach him during his job orientation meeting. :lol: 
October 18, 2008 9:28:12 PM

just tell them if they want to play any cool games or make their children happy. they should buy the most expensive graphics card you have at the store. that usually works.
a b à CPUs
October 19, 2008 1:22:12 AM

CPU speeds up almost everything you do with the computer, while GPU speeds up games, and helps improve HD movies and such.
October 19, 2008 1:55:23 AM

Another sales tip, Once you close the sale, shut up.
a b à CPUs
October 19, 2008 2:56:06 AM

What you really should do is ask the customer to tell you what they want their PC to be able to do.

Your job is to match their expectation with a suitable PC fitted with the right components to achieve that outcome.

I suggest you spend some time rading about the various graphics card ... best bang for the buck cards etc; as well as learning what types of CPU and speeds seem to do the job for the person's needs.

Read the various articles on the net.

Also any computer shop makes quite a bit out of the other things they sell.

So you need to get up to speed on printers (what are good value and the diffierent brands and types) external HDD's, and other such.

Good luck.
October 19, 2008 3:25:59 AM

You shouldn't tell them ANYTHING about the two. You should ask them what they plan to do and then extrapolate which CPU and which GPU will achieve that for the least amount of money.

If they know too much for their own good, then give them definitions that make it easy for them to choose what kind of system they might want. For example, A cpu makes it easier for applications like photoshop to process pictures, or *insert video editing program* to process home videos. A GPU makes it easier to play newer games such as Crysis:Warhead and Far Cry 2.

If someone asks, give them as much as they will understand. The best explanation is the CPU processes basic information while the GPU does game related activities (as well as displays stuff to the screen).
October 19, 2008 3:30:41 AM

Reynod said:
What you really should do is ask the customer to tell you what they want their PC to be able to do.

Your job is to match their expectation with a suitable PC fitted with the right components to achieve that outcome.

I
Good luck.


:non: 
If only that was the case. It may be that in principle but the store will want you sell the most expensive and or what they need to get rid of. Most people who buy ready built PC's from them sort of places are only going to be using it for the odd letter some web etc. The people who they will be keeping on are the people who sell them $100 cables because of the profit they make on them.
a b à CPUs
October 19, 2008 3:42:17 AM

Thats a bull$hit philosophy ... might be reality in many shops but it is bull$hit nevertheless. .. sorry.

It is much better to try to make the customer happy than sell them something they don't need.

Sales people with no morals and companies that espouse a ripoff mentailty will not get red cent off me and any recommendation either.

Good computer sales people make the company run. and repeat sales from happy customers, and their recommendation to others is important for ongoing business.

a b à CPUs
October 19, 2008 8:24:43 AM

Exactly. Repeat sales are everything, not a few one-off $100 ripoffs.
October 19, 2008 8:59:20 AM

I worked at Circuit City selling PCs while I was in college. You'll learn to gauge your customer's understanding of computers and you'll use that to determine how in depth you should go with your explanations. You'll have a good time there and you'll certainly meet some interesting customers. Plenty to tell your friends about over a round of brews. You could tell at least half of your customers ANYTHING and they wouldn't know any better. Just make it sound great. Honestly, I told people that a certain computer was used at NASA for mission control and that another was what CIA hackers used to break enemy codes. I never got called out.

I'm not recommending that you do that. It helped me have fun at my job and my customers were none the wiser.

Pro tip: Once you learn to read your customers, selling accidental damage warranties is a piece of cake. If you have good rapport with somebody, tell them it's like a reduced cost upgrade plan. They spend $300-400 on two year accidental coverage for a laptop, "accidentally" drop it during the 23rd month, and they get a new laptop. Simple as that. If they have the cash, they'll do it.

Pro tip 2: Don't correct your customers too much on terminology. They'll know that you know more than them but they'll also think you're a jerk. If they want to refer to the tower as a CPU or hard drive, let them.

Pro tip 3: Most customers don't care so much about what CPUs and GPUs do. They want to know how big the hard drive is, how much memory it has, and "how many gigabits the cpu has." You'll need to explain to them that the clock speed of a processor is no longer the sole factor in determining performance, but once again, don't overexplain.

Pro tip 4: Leave your biases at home. AMD fanboy? Intel fanatic? Screw you. You're there to sell everything on that floor. Never slam any of the products in front of customers. It might turn out that they can't buy that Q9550 system but the Phenom 8750 is right in their price range. If you've already crapped on the latter, you might lose their business since you've left them no viable options.

If I think of any more advice, I'll post later. Time for me to get some rest.

Edit: I'd also like to add that descendency is right on the money. The customer probably doesn't need to know any technical information about the products that you sell. When I buy a car, I don't need to know minute details about the power train. Your customer is buying a tool/toy to do certain tasks with. It is your job to determine what they plan on doing with the computer and make recommendations based on your knowledge. Once again, it's all about evaluating the type of customer you have and playing it by ear. If they're more technical-minded, they might want you to get in to details, but those customers will solicit that information from you.

Also, Pro tip 6: This is a general sales tip but it's key and many rookies overlook it. After you've answered all of their questions and found the right computer for the right price, ASK THEM FOR THE SALE. You can be direct and say "So whatcha think? You ready to take it home today?" or you could be more indirect and say something like "Now we have a xxx promotion on our circuit city card blah blah blah, would you be interested in that?". You get the drift. The credit card close is good because (1) your boss likes it when you get credit signups and (2) it often leads to them saying that they intend to pay with cash/debit, etc. which is good for you too.

Okay shutting up now.
a b à CPUs
October 19, 2008 1:20:40 PM

Good advice there ... good stuff.

Other than the bull$**** story ... I'd hate to tell something like that to a forum regular here who took someone to the shop.

That might be a humiliating experience.

THG forum junkies ... they are everwhere ... heh heh.

October 19, 2008 6:47:33 PM

Jist tell them the faster your CPU/GPU you have, the bigger your E-Penis is ;) 
October 19, 2008 10:04:12 PM

Reynod said:
Good advice there ... good stuff.

Other than the bull$**** story ... I'd hate to tell something like that to a forum regular here who took someone to the shop.

That might be a humiliating experience.

THG forum junkies ... they are everwhere ... heh heh.


Yeah I wouldn't recommend that anybody try it. It's just something that you can get away with if you know your customer is clueless. It passed the time nicely.
October 20, 2008 1:04:44 AM

Wow thanks blacksails, ill be reading this topic and going over it for quite some time.
a b à CPUs
October 20, 2008 12:39:21 PM

Remember to push 4Gb of RAM to every customer ... as a minimum.

Nothin wore than trying to upgrade a machine a couple years down the track when the RAM is not so popular and costs 4 times as much as when you first bought it.

Good investment.

Moving up to a new OS with the minimum amount of RAM is downright annoying - caching to the HDD is just such a dehumanising experience.

So I tend to recommend a bit more than you need to run the latest OS.

Hope that helps.
October 20, 2008 1:11:20 PM

A simple way to tell them would be to not get into what exactly they are doing but to tell them the CPU and GPU work like ticking clocks, the faster they tick the faster things happen. CPU is the clock for information processing and the GPU is the clock for What you see on your monitor. Or if they are religious tell them GOD is doing it so hurry up and buy something or they will go to Hell.
October 20, 2008 1:18:38 PM

As said before. Ask them what they want to do with it. If they want an explanation then give them one, but otherwise most people honestly don't care. They just want a machine that will boot up, let them do what they need to, then they want to close it down again.

I do telephone/remote support for a company just expanding in the UK, and they told us when we started to explain in detail what we are doing to the customer. Most of them couldn't give a toss TBH. These days we ask if they want to know the fine detail, most don't.
October 20, 2008 1:44:23 PM

Here is a good anology: The CPU is the car's engine, the gpu the car's gearbox.


(A): If the engine (cpu) is really powerful, but the gearbox geared really low (weak gpu) - then you won't go that fast because your on the revlimit in top gear.

(B): Conversely, if the engine (cpu) is weak, and the gearbox geared long (powerful gpu), you might go quicker than (A), but putting in a bigger engine will make things go quicker.


As far as workloads go - gaming needs a top speed - which comes from a good, or well matched, engine (cpu) and gearbox (gpu), whereas general computing requires brute horsepower (cpu).
October 20, 2008 2:22:00 PM

CPU = It makes The Magic Smoke go to the right places

GPU = Makes puts the magic smoke onto the screen so you can see it

;) 
a b à CPUs
October 20, 2008 2:51:51 PM

I am starting to get really worried about what the future holds for us.

As a society we may have peaked.
October 20, 2008 2:59:16 PM

Reynod said:

As a society we may have peaked.


Rubbish - not even close.


For instance, it is conceivable that in 10 years time we have:

1. Cured most cancers through use of nanobombs replacing chemo.

2. Cured viruses (like HIV) through resonant excitation.

3. Developed the ability to reverse engineer stem cells from patients cells, leading to organ cloning and ability to regrow nerves.


And that is just within medicine.
a b à CPUs
October 20, 2008 3:23:31 PM

Back on topic...

I would explain it like this:

The CPU tells you the maximum comparable speed the computer is capable of running. No matter the other components, the CPU sets the speed limit for the rest of the machine.

There are two ways that you can compate CPU's, Speed (GHz) and Cores.

Speed (GHz) is how much the CPU can process at any one time.
Cores are how many times each cycle (might want to dumb that down to second, for comparisons sake) the CPU can access data, so in theory, a 3.2 GHz CPU = 1.6 GHz Duo core.

Next, explain that the above example is not the case, as extra cores aren't always used in the most efficiant manner (watch their expressions to make sure you don't lose them). If all else fails, give the example we use on Toms: In the short term, a faster Duo is slightly quicker, but a Quad will be more likely to last over several years.


The GPU is how fast data sent from the CPU is processed and drawn to the screen. Most GPU's are capable of playing back Video in realtime, but for gaming purposes, the GPU is as impoartant as the CPU (stress this point, if they have no interest in gaming, a 3850 should be plenty for them). This is because even if the CPU gets the data that needs to be drawn to the screen, if that data isn't put on the screen in time, the system slows as a result. Having a GPU that can consistently draw to the screen is more important to gamers than the maximum amount of times that data CAN be drawn

Think of it like this: would you rather have a MAX FPS of 55 and a constant 45 FPS while playing, or a MAX FPS of 70 but only 20-25 FPS while playing? The MAX FPS is the CPU, and the actual FPS is the GPU.


Hope this helps.
a c 215 à CPUs
October 20, 2008 3:45:12 PM

CPUs and GPUs work just dandy. Leave it at that.

The less technical and the more you listen to what the customer wants, the better you will be ....

Unless some of us from THG follow you to CC to harass you :lol: