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AMD Shangai pricing - not cheap.

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October 29, 2008 10:34:54 PM

Advanced Micro Devices' first 45-nanometer chip, the Shanghai quad-core Opteron, has made its debut at resellers.

The officially unannounced Opteron 837X and 838X series processors are not cheap. Online reseller PC Connection lists the Opteron QC (quad-core) 8384 at $2,509. Another reseller, Buy.com lists the same processor at $2,240.

The 8384 is expected to run at 2.7GHz and draw 75 watts, relatively low power consumption for a quad-core server processor.

The 8385--same clock speed with a faster system bus--is offered for $2,509 at PC Connection.

Other processors listed include the 8382 (2.6GHz), 8380 (2.5GHz), and 8378 (2.4GHz), priced at $2,177, $1,768, and $1,360 respectively at PC Connection. Note that these prices will differ from official pricing from AMD.

The Shanghai Opteron 230X series includes the 2382 (2.6GHz) and 2380 (2.5GHz). These are priced at $1,019 and $814 respectively at PC Connnection.


full article
http://news.cnet.com/8301-1001_3-10078381-92.html
October 29, 2008 10:54:23 PM

Actually for the 2xxx series, they're priced rather nicely. Similarly clocked Barcelona (2360SE) costs $1239.00 on Newegg, compared to Shanghai 2380 at $814.

As for the 8xxx series, I'm really not surprised. Afterall AMD only has about a year left to milk everything out of the 4+ socket server market. After that, they will have to compete with Nehalem.
October 29, 2008 11:50:59 PM

I think I remember a forum or news flash that came across Tom's recently that gave the pricing for Intel's new server line. If I remember correctly, the pricing on those processors was above $2000. So really, these aren't priced that high. Maybe a little, but theyre brand new, and AMD really needs some money. These processors aren't designed for the average market. They are for the server market, where companies have millions to throw away every year on IT systems like these. If you can't afford one, go to the desktop series.
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a c 127 à CPUs
October 30, 2008 6:51:35 AM

Server chips. Always pricey.
a b à CPUs
October 30, 2008 7:12:53 AM

Not to mention these aren't meant to have come out yet...

...and they're new...
a b à CPUs
October 30, 2008 11:53:22 AM

Shiny !!!
a b à CPUs
October 30, 2008 12:46:36 PM

and 75W TDP for a 2.7GHz quadcore is quite nice indeed, I wonder what kind of speed one could get from these with say 140W (current 9950BE) power draw...
a b à CPUs
October 30, 2008 12:52:02 PM

oops that was 125W for current ones, the 140w was earlier B2? stepping or something
a c 110 à CPUs
October 30, 2008 12:55:56 PM

yomamafor1 said:
Actually for the 2xxx series, they're priced rather nicely. Similarly clocked Barcelona (2360SE) costs $1239.00 on Newegg, compared to Shanghai 2380 at $814.

As for the 8xxx series, I'm really not surprised. Afterall AMD only has about a year left to milk everything out of the 4+ socket server market. After that, they will have to compete with Nehalem.


I'll give AMD partial credit for throwing a bone to all the folks with socket F platforms - it's essentially now a dead-end after 2 1/2 years but the new 45nm quads will give some serious jam to existing 4p/8p systems.

I don't know much about the new enterprise chipsets on the AMD side (I think they are now called 'G34') but there is no way they will be backward-compatible. IIRC each socket will have HT links to each other socket in addition to a separate HT lane per socket for a 'Torrenza' interconnect.
a c 99 à CPUs
October 31, 2008 2:20:25 AM

Wisecracker said:
I'll give AMD partial credit for throwing a bone to all the folks with socket F platforms - it's essentially now a dead-end after 2 1/2 years but the new 45nm quads will give some serious jam to existing 4p/8p systems.


I wouldn't call 2.5 years, two microarchitectures, a core doubling, and three process node shrinks too shabby.

Quote:
I don't know much about the new enterprise chipsets on the AMD side (I think they are now called 'G34') but there is no way they will be backward-compatible. IIRC each socket will have HT links to each other socket in addition to a separate HT lane per socket for a 'Torrenza' interconnect.


Socket G34 (1974 lands) needed to be bigger than Socket F (1207 lands) for extra HT links and the 256-bit DDR3 interface it supports. The four DDR3 channels alone take up 960 of those lands. I think that AMD did this as they are planning on putting six- and twelve-core chips in those sockets and needed a bunch of bandwidth.
a b à CPUs
October 31, 2008 4:30:02 AM

^ Hopefully the socket sizes don't get too large... I don't wanna get a separate board for the CPU
a c 127 à CPUs
October 31, 2008 9:40:45 AM

MU_Engineer said:
I wouldn't call 2.5 years, two microarchitectures, a core doubling, and three process node shrinks too shabby.

Quote:
I don't know much about the new enterprise chipsets on the AMD side (I think they are now called 'G34') but there is no way they will be backward-compatible. IIRC each socket will have HT links to each other socket in addition to a separate HT lane per socket for a 'Torrenza' interconnect.


Socket G34 (1974 lands) needed to be bigger than Socket F (1207 lands) for extra HT links and the 256-bit DDR3 interface it supports. The four DDR3 channels alone take up 960 of those lands. I think that AMD did this as they are planning on putting six- and twelve-core chips in those sockets and needed a bunch of bandwidth.


2.5 years isn't that bad at all really.

And so it is SG34. I have been reading about that. When does that plan to hit specifically? And a 256bit IMC? Hope they can do it without adding too much cost to the chips. Then again this is the server market so that wont matter as much. But a 256bit IMC and tri channel DDR3 should provide some serious bandwidth.
a c 110 à CPUs
October 31, 2008 12:21:07 PM

MU_Engineer said:
I wouldn't call 2.5 years, two microarchitectures, a core doubling, and three process node shrinks too shabby.

Quote:
I don't know much about the new enterprise chipsets on the AMD side (I think they are now called 'G34') but there is no way they will be backward-compatible. IIRC each socket will have HT links to each other socket in addition to a separate HT lane per socket for a 'Torrenza' interconnect.


Socket G34 (1974 lands) needed to be bigger than Socket F (1207 lands) for extra HT links and the 256-bit DDR3 interface it supports. The four DDR3 channels alone take up 960 of those lands. I think that AMD did this as they are planning on putting six- and twelve-core chips in those sockets and needed a bunch of bandwidth.


I agree --- it's not shabby at all.

And 55w HE quads will add even more life to Socket F.
a c 99 à CPUs
October 31, 2008 3:23:51 PM

jimmysmitty said:
2.5 years isn't that bad at all really.

And so it is SG34. I have been reading about that. When does that plan to hit specifically?


This is AMD we're talking about, so we'll only really know about one month before we can buy them. It is supposed to be sometime in 2009 from what I heard.

Quote:
And a 256bit IMC? Hope they can do it without adding too much cost to the chips. Then again this is the server market so that wont matter as much. But a 256bit IMC and tri channel DDR3 should provide some serious bandwidth.


There are two Opteron models *scheduled* for Socket G34- the 6-core Sao Paulo and the 12-core Magny Cours that is comprised of two 6-core Sao Paulo dies. My guess is that the 6-core units have a 128-bit interface and the 12-core units have two 128-bit interfaces and then tie the two dies together over on-die HyperTransport (basically making a dual-socket setup right on the CPU package.) I've speculated in the past that is how AMD would have to do an IMC, and sure enough, all signs point to that's what they're going to do.

Forgot one thing- a 256-bit IMC would be quad-channel DDR3. 192 bits is tri-channel.
October 31, 2008 4:25:36 PM

sedaine said:
Advanced Micro Devices' first 45-nanometer chip, the Shanghai quad-core Opteron, has made its debut at resellers.

The officially unannounced Opteron 837X and 838X series processors are not cheap. Online reseller PC Connection lists the Opteron QC (quad-core) 8384 at $2,509. Another reseller, Buy.com lists the same processor at $2,240.

The 8384 is expected to run at 2.7GHz and draw 75 watts, relatively low power consumption for a quad-core server processor.

The 8385--same clock speed with a faster system bus--is offered for $2,509 at PC Connection.

Other processors listed include the 8382 (2.6GHz), 8380 (2.5GHz), and 8378 (2.4GHz), priced at $2,177, $1,768, and $1,360 respectively at PC Connection. Note that these prices will differ from official pricing from AMD.

The Shanghai Opteron 230X series includes the 2382 (2.6GHz) and 2380 (2.5GHz). These are priced at $1,019 and $814 respectively at PC Connnection.


full article
http://news.cnet.com/8301-1001_3-10078381-92.html


Yeah, but the 8-way chips are always more expensive, especially the top end ones. The 2380 is a much more reasonably priced one. And as always, launch prices are high.
October 31, 2008 8:35:26 PM

I wonder how Opteron 837X and 838X game, and how well they will overclock.....
October 31, 2008 9:17:20 PM

kassenz said:
I wonder how Opteron 837X and 838X game, and how well they will overclock.....


They're not meant to game. Opteron 8XXX are for 8 socket systems. 8x4= 32 cores

32 core gaming? I think not. This is meant for the server world and server apps.
a c 127 à CPUs
November 1, 2008 9:50:17 AM

^Thats $766.66 per CPU. And thats a discount one too. For that I could get 4 Q6600s or 4.5 Phenom 9950s per FX62 meaning a total of 240 Q6600s or 270 Phenom 9950s and have much better power.

And second, I didn't know that the MCs bit size controlled how many channels it was. Interesting. I guess that would make it 64bits per channel then. Wounder if they will ever go up to 128bits per channel and if that could possibly have any benefits.
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