Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

I7 overclocked now it's dead

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
October 25, 2009 4:11:29 PM

Greetings --
I built an i7 system about 2 months ago and I think I've killed it. I started over clocking about a month ago and have been slowly going up, using the BIOS OC presets, finally settling on 3.7 ghz. Not even once did I have any stability issues (temps ranged from the mid 60s to low-mid 70's during video encoding and around 40-45 at idle). I added a couple of case fans last week which lowed the temps by a few degrees and a couple of days ago the room was particularly cool so I thought I'd go for broke and ramp it up to 4 ghz just to see how it would go. Everything seemed fine. During video encoding the temps occasionally went up to 80, never higher, and for the most part hovered in the mid-70s. After about 20 minutes the system just completely died -- it was as if the power was cut off. On re-start it got to the splash screen for a couple of seconds and then it died again. Then it just wouldn't start at all. Occasionally, when I pressed the power button I'd get a split-second flash of light from the LEDs on the case fans. I found the list on this site of stuff to try when computers won't boot and none of that worked (I also did a search but couldn't find anything). I'm completely new to this, but it seemed like the PSU was the likely problem so I went out and got power supply tester. After playing around for the better part of an afternoon, it seems that the 8-pin ATX 12V motherboard power connector is the problem. When I plug in the the 24 pin power connector to the motherboard (with the 8-pin connector disconnected) and hit the power switch the case fans turn on normally. But when I connect the 8-pin connector to the motherboard and test the 24-pin connector it tests bad (both the 8-pin and 24-pin connections test fine when only connected to the tester). I'm assuming (and, again, I'm new at this) that this means the motherboard is bad, but it would be great to get the opinion of people who know this stuff. Is there any chance it could just be the processor that's gone bad? Or could I have killed both the proc and the MB? Thanks a bunch in advance.

Here's my system:
i7 920 processor
ASRock X58 Deluxe LGA 1366 Intel X58 ATX Intel Motherboard
Cooler Master V8 CPU Cooler
Corsair 400W ATX12V V2.2 80 Power Supply
Cooler Master Gladiator 600 Mid Tower ATX Case (with side, top, back, and 2 front fans)
Corsair XMS3 6GB (3 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Triple Channel Kit
Asus EN8400GS SILENT/HTP/512M GeForce 8400 GS 512MB 64-bit GDDR2 PCI Express x16 Video Card
Running Ubuntu 9.04 (64bit)

More about : overclocked dead

October 25, 2009 7:35:27 PM

Did you ever PRIME95 stress it to find if it was actually stable?

Best solution

a b K Overclocking
October 25, 2009 10:14:38 PM
Share

mightytoaster said:
Greetings --
I built an i7 system about 2 months ago and I think I've killed it. I started over clocking about a month ago and have been slowly going up, using the BIOS OC presets, finally settling on 3.7 ghz. Not even once did I have any stability issues (temps ranged from the mid 60s to low-mid 70's during video encoding and around 40-45 at idle). I added a couple of case fans last week which lowed the temps by a few degrees and a couple of days ago the room was particularly cool so I thought I'd go for broke and ramp it up to 4 ghz just to see how it would go. Everything seemed fine. During video encoding the temps occasionally went up to 80, never higher, and for the most part hovered in the mid-70s. After about 20 minutes the system just completely died -- it was as if the power was cut off. On re-start it got to the splash screen for a couple of seconds and then it died again. Then it just wouldn't start at all. Occasionally, when I pressed the power button I'd get a split-second flash of light from the LEDs on the case fans. I found the list on this site of stuff to try when computers won't boot and none of that worked (I also did a search but couldn't find anything). I'm completely new to this, but it seemed like the PSU was the likely problem so I went out and got power supply tester. After playing around for the better part of an afternoon, it seems that the 8-pin ATX 12V motherboard power connector is the problem. When I plug in the the 24 pin power connector to the motherboard (with the 8-pin connector disconnected) and hit the power switch the case fans turn on normally. But when I connect the 8-pin connector to the motherboard and test the 24-pin connector it tests bad (both the 8-pin and 24-pin connections test fine when only connected to the tester). I'm assuming (and, again, I'm new at this) that this means the motherboard is bad, but it would be great to get the opinion of people who know this stuff. Is there any chance it could just be the processor that's gone bad? Or could I have killed both the proc and the MB? Thanks a bunch in advance.

Here's my system:
i7 920 processor
ASRock X58 Deluxe LGA 1366 Intel X58 ATX Intel Motherboard
Cooler Master V8 CPU Cooler
Corsair 400W ATX12V V2.2 80 Power Supply
Cooler Master Gladiator 600 Mid Tower ATX Case (with side, top, back, and 2 front fans)
Corsair XMS3 6GB (3 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Triple Channel Kit
Asus EN8400GS SILENT/HTP/512M GeForce 8400 GS 512MB 64-bit GDDR2 PCI Express x16 Video Card
Running Ubuntu 9.04 (64bit)



there's your problem right there ^^^^^.

get a more powerfull psu, have you looked up what happens when the mobo doesn't have enough power?. after a new psu, see if that fixes it then go with a new mobo, that should solve it tbh your psu couldn't handle the load so your mobo cant boot. i have a core 2 duo but i still run a 750w psu just incase
Related resources
October 25, 2009 10:24:50 PM

I didn't run any stress tests, but I did run handbrake many times for 6-8 hours (it's multithreaded and from what I could tell from the process monitor the CPU was under fairly high load). In hindsight, I should have spent a bit more time reading up on overclocking before I started. When I first set up the system I had hoped to maybe get it up to 3 ghz, but the presets seemed to be working so well that there didn't seem to be any reason not to kept going (I would have stopped if the temps had gone past 80 or even were consistently past 75 or so). But for now I just need to know if I'm looking at a new motherboard, a CPU or both.
a b K Overclocking
October 25, 2009 10:29:12 PM

new psu ^^^^^^^^ 400w is barely enough for the stock setup never mind when you oc that mofo
October 25, 2009 10:32:41 PM

What voltages were you using for your overclocks?

Uncore voltage?
Core voltage?
DRAM voltage?
October 25, 2009 10:34:54 PM

Ditto on the 'new PSU' comments. For a high end system like yours, I'm surprised you skimped on it. Hopefully that's what it's down to, and you'll quickly be back up n' running.
October 25, 2009 10:40:06 PM

Again, in hindsight (I say that a lot) I should have gone with a better psu. But it did run fine for nearly 2 months with the 400w one. And after it died I took the MB out of the case and I tried to get it to POST with nothing attached and didn't have any luck. Since plugging in the 8-pin ATX 12V connection makes the 24-pin connector test bad it seems like it might be a short in the MB. Why would it boot OK with everything attached for so long and then refuse to boot up even with everything removed? I do hope you're right, tho. If I can get through this only having to buy a new power supply I'll be a happy camper.
October 25, 2009 10:41:14 PM

mortonww said:
What voltages were you using for your overclocks?

Uncore voltage?
Core voltage?
DRAM voltage?


I was using presets (I now know that's stupid) so I can't say.
October 26, 2009 1:35:03 AM

I bet that PSU was rippling like mad.
a b K Overclocking
October 26, 2009 1:39:18 AM

An single mainstream graphics card Core i7 rig can exceed 450 Watts at the power cord when under 100% workload and heavily overclocked with HT on. A 500 Watt PSU should be considered bare minimum.
October 28, 2009 1:12:42 PM

All of that CPU muscle and such a weak GPU. Balance man... balance!

i7-920 @ 4 GHz + Nvidia 8400 GS = HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA.
October 28, 2009 3:10:38 PM

You will likely find that your machine runs faster and cooler once you get a stronger PSU in there as well.

It's entirely possible your MB is toast now, but likely you will get away with only beefing up your PSU (try to double it).

As Rodney said, a little balance may also help!
a b K Overclocking
October 28, 2009 3:27:27 PM

why go for a £200 gfx card when all you need it for is cpu tasks
October 28, 2009 3:42:51 PM

I'll admit that I was stupid for trying to cheap out on the PSU, but even though the GPU seems idiotic on paper, I'm going to defend it. I had the card left over from another build and was trying to keep costs down. And since I built it mostly for video encoding (hundreds of DVDs) and not games a cheap GPU seemed OK. I might have made the wrong choice, but before I killed it, it would take a little over an hour to encode a 2 hour movie (it was taking upwards of 5 hours on my other machines) so I was pretty happy with the performance. I do plan on upgrading the GPU at some point (assuming I get the thing running again).

But for now, per the suggestions here (thanks to all who responded), I'm going to start with a better power supply. Does 850w seem reasonable?
a b K Overclocking
October 28, 2009 4:20:30 PM

yea anything over 600w is good
October 29, 2009 1:48:22 AM

Sounds good!
a b K Overclocking
October 29, 2009 4:52:17 AM

mightytoaster,

You're over-compensating. 850 Watts is way overkill for a single GPU rig.

I've performed full-load tests on my overclocked i7-920 / overclocked GTX-280 rig by simultaneously running Prime95 "Large FFT's" and ATI Tool "Scan for Artifact", which simulates a worst-case CPU / GPU load condition that you'll never encounter, even during the most extreme application / gaming usage. While the computer was running these simultaneous loads, I measured the Watts consumed at the power cord through a mutifunction digital Wattmeter, and carefully documented the results at different CPU / GPU overclock combinations.

During the heaviest CPU / GPU synthetic load test, the highest power indication was 560 Watts on a Corsair 650 Watt PSU, which is 86.3% load. :D  The most severe gaming load was 402 Watts. As you can see, 650 Watts is more than adequate for an overclocked i7 single GPU rig. You might want to rethink your PSU selection.

Hope this helps,

Comp :sol: 
November 1, 2009 4:00:20 PM

clear your cmos, put everything back to stock, get a better psu ;) 
November 1, 2009 10:06:39 PM

It's not the power supply. I got a new one (a Cosair 850w -- I know it's overkill but I found a good deal). Now the question (I think) is whether I should replace the motherboard or the CPU first (I tried starting with each stick of memory individually and the video card works fine in another machine so I think I've narrowed down to the CPU or MB). I did notice something when I tried out the new power supply that might be helpful. Like before, when I plug both the 8-pin CPU power and 24 pin and press the power button I get nothing. If I unplug the 8-pin power I still get nothing when I press the power. But if I then clear the cmos and power up in the same configuration (8-pin disconnected; 24-pin is connected) the fans come on (and if I plug in the 8-pin again and power up I'm back to nothing). I'm hoping that someone can help me figure out where to go from here. New MB or CPU? Is there a chance that both will need replacing? Is there a chance that a bad MB could destroy a new CPU (and conversely, could a bad CPU kill a MB?). As always, any help is greatly appreciated. And thanks again to all who have replied.
November 1, 2009 10:17:22 PM

Take the cpu out and look at the pins. Does it look fried?
It's probably just your motherboard. RMA it, it's under warranty.
a b K Overclocking
November 2, 2009 8:00:56 AM

more likely your mobo is dead, instead of buying a new one ask the person you bought it off to rma it and you might get a free replacement, generally cpu's are tougher than mobo's. ive seen a i7 920 been connected to a car battery and it still worked after lol, but i know for a fact that any mobo that has been overvolted will fry the caps as soon as it gets the chance
November 2, 2009 4:46:54 PM

I checked the CPU pins and the MB socket and everything looked fine so I'm hoping the CPU is OK. Unfortunately, I'm past the return date for the place I bought it from (newegg). I've contacted Asrock tech support but haven't heard anything back yet.
November 2, 2009 4:50:09 PM

If you post a review for the exact model you have on Newegg, often times manufacturers will scour the reviews and post a reply. If you put a brief write up of your issues (might want to leave out the overclocking part) you may get a response from tech support...it's worth a try yah?
December 16, 2009 6:41:48 PM

cooler master UCP 750W.ur welcome:) 
!