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What do GHZ in a processor do?

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November 4, 2008 7:03:41 PM

Okay yea like the Q6600 has 2.4ghz stock or somtin i forgot but what exactly does OCing the GHZ do to the performance?

More about : ghz processor

November 4, 2008 7:15:10 PM

bumpity bump
a b à CPUs
November 4, 2008 7:16:17 PM

The "Hertz" part of the word is a measure of frequency in cycles per second. So one hertz = 1 cycle (complete action) per second. 100 hertz means 100 times a second... One Gigahertz equals one Billion cycles per second. So your 2.4Ghz processor cycles at roughly 2,400,000,000 times per second.

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November 4, 2008 7:18:27 PM

Make it go faster... When talking CPU's the hz (hertz) is the number if instructions per second the chip can complete, g (giga) is one billion (1,000,000,000) - so a 2.4ghz chip does 2,400,000,000 instructions a second. If you up the clock speed to 3ghz then it does 3,000,000,000 instructions a second....

Make sense??
a b à CPUs
November 4, 2008 7:23:08 PM

i think of it as rpm in engine haha ;P

the bigger the better

my q6600 screams @3.4ghz now.....
November 4, 2008 7:23:56 PM

Its the measure of cycles a processor does each second. The car equivalent is RPMs on the tachometer.

PS - You fail for bumping your own post 12 minutes after you created it.
November 4, 2008 7:35:34 PM

TechnologyCoordinator said:

PS - You fail for bumping your own post 12 minutes after you created it.


HAHA Too Funny..^^^^ :pt1cable: 
November 4, 2008 8:10:06 PM

Quote:
These people are wrong, it actually makes the whips that whip the little Imps inside work faster, trust me.


You fool! It is processor gnomes, not imps.
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November 4, 2008 8:11:12 PM

Hurts per second = How many times you say ouch per sec as you hold on to that live 110 AC wire.

Personnaly I still prefer the older CPS (Cycles per Sec) over Hz - More descriptive, But then KCps is more verbage than KHz

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November 4, 2008 8:12:14 PM

You mean, they aren't nano-hamsters?
November 4, 2008 8:14:21 PM

TechnologyCoordinator said:
Its the measure of cycles a processor does each second. The car equivalent is RPMs on the tachometer.

PS - You fail for bumping your own post 12 minutes after you created it.


Lmao my bad im use to coming from forums were u get a reply 30 secs after posting it lmao
April 15, 2009 2:49:28 PM

i just bought a 10 ghz pc!
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April 15, 2009 3:41:39 PM

A Hertz is the measure of the time it takes for the CPU to cycle (IE, from a high power state to a low power state). At the start of this cycle, the CPU receives the instructions it is to perform, so a higher cycle rate will give the CPU instructions at a faster rate, theoretically increasing performance.

Instructions Per Cycle is the term used to measure how many instructions a CPU can perform in a single cycle. As such, a slower cycle rate (lower GHz) CPU can be faster then a CPU with a higher cycle rate if it can do more instructions per clock cycle. (Athlon vs Pentium 4)
April 15, 2009 4:56:03 PM

What I want to know is what you exactly do when you OC. You increase FSB, but what do you actually do to make it do more calculations per second?
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April 15, 2009 5:04:22 PM

You take a can of Pepsi and pour it slowly on the CPU. Careful, not too fast. Coke will do too, but benchmarks show it's not as efficient. The little imps in the CPU will use the sugar in the drink and work faster at those calculations. By the way, it has to be regular Pepsi, not the diet version with fake sugar. And don't make it too cold, or the imps will catch a cold and call in sick.


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April 15, 2009 5:30:00 PM

gamerk316 said:
A Hertz is the measure of the time it takes for the CPU to cycle (IE, from a high power state to a low power state). At the start of this cycle, the CPU receives the instructions it is to perform, so a higher cycle rate will give the CPU instructions at a faster rate, theoretically increasing performance.

Instructions Per Cycle is the term used to measure how many instructions a CPU can perform in a single cycle. As such, a slower cycle rate (lower GHz) CPU can be faster then a CPU with a higher cycle rate if it can do more instructions per clock cycle. (Athlon vs Pentium 4)



This.

The measure of time can be shown as a sine wave.

Each component of your computer (regardless of clock speed) must cycle in time with the 'wave'. This is called the PLL or 'Phase Lock Loop'.

The clock is directed by a crystal oscillator which (IIRC) runs at either 33MHz or 40MHz. Ultimate clock speeds are determined by the use of 'multipliers' off the crystal.

The most prevalent operating status (i.e., clock cycle) of a microprocessor today is the 'wait state'. CPUs are now so fast they 'wait' for the system memory. Intel with the Core2s developed a more advanced branch predictor to 'forecast' the next memory read during the wait states.

A 'zero wait state' means that your cpu and memory are operating at the same frequency.

When you increase the FSB on an Intel Core2 microprocessor you are simply increasing the speed of the clock cycle therefore your calculations (and branch predictions) from memory are faster.

The i7 (and AMD) are a little different. AMD for example has a base clock of 200MHz (the 'crystal' speed x 5, I imagine). The CPU, the HT and the IMC/NB speeds are all based upon multipliers of the base clock.

I believe (but don't really know) that i7 is quite similar.
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