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Would My PSU be able to handle tri-sli xfx 260s?

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  • SLI
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November 4, 2008 7:48:08 PM

More about : psu handle tri sli xfx 260s

November 4, 2008 8:19:50 PM

No to three. Not sure about two, you need more information.

When you are trying to determine whether your PSU is powerful enough, you need to look not just at the overall wattage but the amount of current on each rail. Your PSU has 1 12V rail rated at 60 Amps. That is a hell of a lot for one rail, but beings that there is only one, all of the 12 volt components in your system must not draw more than this amount.

According to Nvidia, a gtx 260 maxes out at 182 Watts. That's a little over 15 amps apiece. Tri-SLI would therefore draw about 46 amps. That wouldn't leave much for the rest of your system. Your hard drive(s), motherboard, processor, and other stuff like a DVD-drive, etc. all draw from that same 12 volt rail.

What you need to do is calculate out how much power each of your components use by checking the specs for those parts. Add it up and make sure it's less than 60 amps.

If you are going to buy a new one, an easy way to be sure is to just look at Nvidia's list of approved PSUs for tri and regular SLI applications. They have lists for each type of graphics arrangement. Although, just because it is not on the list doesn't necessarily mean it won't work.
November 4, 2008 8:37:36 PM

gimpy1 said:
No to three. Not sure about two, you need more information.

When you are trying to determine whether your PSU is powerful enough, you need to look not just at the overall wattage but the amount of current on each rail. Your PSU has 1 12V rail rated at 60 Amps. That is a hell of a lot for one rail, but beings that there is only one, all of the 12 volt components in your system must not draw more than this amount.

According to Nvidia, a gtx 260 maxes out at 182 Watts. That's a little over 15 amps apiece. Tri-SLI would therefore draw about 46 amps. That wouldn't leave much for the rest of your system. Your hard drive(s), motherboard, processor, and other stuff like a DVD-drive, etc. all draw from that same 12 volt rail.

What you need to do is calculate out how much power each of your components use by checking the specs for those parts. Add it up and make sure it's less than 60 amps.

If you are going to buy a new one, an easy way to be sure is to just look at Nvidia's list of approved PSUs for tri and regular SLI applications. They have lists for each type of graphics arrangement. Although, just because it is not on the list doesn't necessarily mean it won't work.


How about this one it has 3x 12v rails

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


and i found a cheaper from with 3x 12v rails

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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November 4, 2008 9:00:36 PM

You really should get a good 1000W PSU to run tripple SLi, or at least a minimum 850W. At 15A a card with 3 cards you're looking at devoting at least 540W to your video cards plus you have to consider the power draw of the rest of the system and peak power considerations.

You need a PSU like this Corsair just to have enough connectors

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Altho if you want to use adapters it's up to you. Just make sure you have enough volts on the 12v rails and that you don't overtax any one rail. If you just want to run two cards in SLi then the 750W Corsair PSU that you originally picked should be O.k.
November 4, 2008 9:02:42 PM

The top link to the 620 has 50 amps total on the 12v rails.
The coolermaster has 45 amps total on the 12v rails
November 4, 2008 9:32:51 PM

The Corsair 750w will have enough grunt for the 3 however the issue will be the amount of connectors you need.

Tri-SLI with 260's max power draw is 389w (not including the rest of the system.)
http://archive.atomicmpc.com.au/forums.asp?s=2&c=7&t=9354

The 620 and 650w psu's you picked next would be dicey at best. Just because it has more 12v rails doesnt mean its a better PSU.

The 1000w suggested by Megamanx00 is a great PSU, it has all the connectors you need and will be sufficient for any rig (seen these in a review with TRI-SLI 280's and solid as a rock).

If you dont have the mulah for the 1000w the 750w will adapters will be fine (however messy the cabling is)

EDIT: BTW that corsair 750w has one massive 12v rail, so no chance of overloading any of the rails as its just one big one ;) 
November 4, 2008 11:00:47 PM

A simple way to tell is if the PSU has the 6 pci-e connectors required for the three GTX260's(2 each).
Forget the wattage and amps, a Quality unit with 6 connectors will do the job.
This will have to be an expensive 1000w+ unit. PC P&C 1200 for example:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Do you really need tri-sli???
Dual GTX280 would be cheaper, and arguably better.
November 5, 2008 3:04:31 AM

geofelt said:
A simple way to tell is if the PSU has the 6 pci-e connectors required for the three GTX260's(2 each).
Forget the wattage and amps, a Quality unit with 6 connectors will do the job.
This will have to be an expensive 1000w+ unit. PC P&C 1200 for example:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Do you really need tri-sli???
Dual GTX280 would be cheaper, and arguably better.


Is this a joke I'm not getting? Are you seriously suggesting a PSU for almost $500 for tri-SLI GTX260's? I read on Anandtech this article, you should check it out, it'll help out a lot. http://www.anandtech.com/casecoolingpsus/showdoc.aspx?i... It shows how many watts you "ACTUALLY" need instead of buying what some guy thinks you should get.
November 5, 2008 3:32:47 AM

geofelt said:
A simple way to tell is if the PSU has the 6 pci-e connectors required for the three GTX260's(2 each).
Forget the wattage and amps, a Quality unit with 6 connectors will do the job.
This will have to be an expensive 1000w+ unit. PC P&C 1200 for example:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Do you really need tri-sli???
Dual GTX280 would be cheaper, and arguably better.


That PSU is way over priced especially since there are cheaper 1000W units from the likes of Corsair, FSP, and Antec. I'm also not too crazy about P&C stuff, but whatever.

Anyway just be mindful about picking out a good PSU. You can can always use the wattage calculator

http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculator.jsp

Just enter in all your components and see what it tells you to get a rough idea. Anyway, you should keep in mind that in general, the closer and longer you run a PSU at it's peak, the shorter it's life will be. Also, cheaply made PSUs usually can't sustain close to their rated output for more than an instant without dying, in some cases rather violently.
November 5, 2008 3:05:32 PM

The corsair 1000w unit would certainly be a better deal:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
If the psu does not have enough conectors, you will have to use pci-e adapters and hope that the psu is able to power them. I think it is much safer to use a PSU that has the native leads in the first place.

If one is spending the dollars on three high end vga cards, which is primarily for bragging rights, or professional use, then why not but the best psu out there.
November 5, 2008 3:16:15 PM

That Corsair 750 will handle a pair of 260s with no issues. For 3 of them, start looking at either the PC Power and Cooling 1kw PSU or the Corsair 1kw as others have suggested.
November 5, 2008 8:01:47 PM

Another thing for you to consider is that when you run 3 GPUs, you are going to start having a bottleneck with your CPU. Since you are asking about PSU basic capabilities (which is fine), I'll assume that you are not overclocking your CPU. Without overclocking, you will find that depending on the game you will not get the full potential out of tri-SLI.

I would recommend going with 2 GPUs. For one, 2 GPUs tend to scale better, meaning you will get a greater return on your investment. Second, it is far cheaper, not just in the GPUs themselves, but in all the other components you would need to run them. Third, 3 GPUs produce a lot of heat; there just isn't enough room between the cards. If you use two instead you can get far better airflow and maybe even overclock them to eek out some more performance (the 260 is a great overclocker)

If you want to run 2 GPUs, I would recommend this power supply. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

It gives nice clean power with 6 12v rails. The downside is it does not have modular cabling, but that's not the end of the world. It may be a little more than you want to spend, but you can get a good deal if you combo it with a case (I like the Centurion 590).
November 9, 2008 6:05:31 PM

+1 for the Corsair 1000

+1 for two GPU's instead of three.
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