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Interesting thought... just for fun...

Last response: in Storage
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January 18, 2010 5:28:15 AM

I just built a new rig and upon deciding which hard drives I was going to go with (I used raid-0 on my Athlon FX and plan to do it again for this built) I came across a question I couldn't find the answer to. Now this isn't really a big deal YET but the way storage is going it may be soon.

I am sure most of you guys realize that now we have a barrier issue with the standard bios setup that won't allow for more than a 2tb drive to be recognized. From what I read this is exclusive to PCs and Macs are built to exceed this. My question is can you run two 2tb drives in raid-0 (or 2 1.5tbs for a total of 3tb) to get a total of 4tb? I'm curious since the raid controller is usually, if not always, seperate from the bios instructions. I bet within a matter of 5 years we will exceed the need for 2tb on most moderate to high end rigs as more HD media and gaming becomes standard.

Anyone try this just for the heck of it? I'd be curious to hear what would happen.
January 18, 2010 5:58:30 AM

The 64 bit (not sure on the 32bit version, prob not) Win7 version is not restricted to 2TB

windows Server 2003 also surpases the 2TB limit I understand.

The better NAS boxes also surpass the 2TB limit
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January 18, 2010 6:01:50 AM

Yeah but you need EFI to have a single drive surpass 2tb and while the operating system is equipped your bios isn't.
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January 18, 2010 6:09:56 AM

oop, yea, thought about that B4 posting, but getting tired here working through the night and forgot to add it - 8am now lol

though I think more MB's than you might think support over 2TB.

Will look into it later.
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January 18, 2010 6:15:47 AM

or as you say, with a BIOS update in many cases too
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January 18, 2010 6:18:42 AM

Well it's a different architecture... I have read somewhere that a few boards will support EFI starting around now but it has to be built for it not just able to be flashed.
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January 18, 2010 6:35:34 AM

Windows requires that the GUID Partition Tables be used in place of the standard Master Boot Record (MBR) partition tables. You will need Windows XP x64 Edition or Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1, Windows Vista, Windows 7, or later for GPT support

See:

http://carltonbale.com/how-to-break-the-2tb-2-terabyte-file-system-limit

for more info.

Have fun - getting back to some work for a little ;) 
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