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Building First Gaming PC - Need Advice/Opinions Etc

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Anonymous
August 23, 2008 4:41:52 AM

EDIT 8/23/08 - Added/Changed/Updated Motherboard, CPU Cooler, Cooler Bracket, Thermal Compound, PSU, DVD Drive, Case and OS.

EDIT 8/24/08 - Updated to final build.

Hey guys,

Basically, I am a first time builder and you can say I have never touched the insides of a computer before. However, recently I was able to convince my parents to let me spend about $1200 to $1500 on my first real gaming rig. At first I considered getting a premade Alienware but after a bit of researching, I see that by building my own I could make an even more powerful PC for the same price; and learn a bit about computers in the process.

I'm not particularly tech saavy, so I don't even know where to start when it comes to looking for parts. But I went onto Newegg and tried to put together a setup using my budget and my limited knowledge as guides.

My current setup is below -

Processor
Intel Core 2 Duo E8400 Wolfdale 3.0GHz 6MB L2 Cache LGA 775 65W Dual-Core Processor
Processor Cooler
XIGMATEK HDT-S1283 120mm Rifle CPU Cooler
Processor Cooler Bracket
XIGMATEK ACK-I7751 Retention Bracket
Thermal Compound
ARCTIC COOLING MX-2 Thermal Compound
Motherboard
ASUS P5Q-E LGA 775 Intel P45 ATX Intel Motherboard
Video Card
POWERCOLOR AX4870 512MD5-PPH Radeon HD 4870 512MB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFire Supported Video Card
RAM
CORSAIR 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory
Hard Drive
Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 ST3500630AS 500GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive - OEM
Power Supply
CORSAIR CMPSU-750TX 750W ATX12V / EPS12V NVIDIA SLI Ready ATI CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS Certified Active PFC Power Supply
DVD Drive
LITE-ON Black 20X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 8X DVD+R DL 20X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 12X DVD-RAM 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 32X CD-RW 48X CD-ROM 2MB Cache SATA 20X DVD±R DVD Burner - OEM
Case
COOLER MASTER RC-690-KKN1-GP Black SECC/ ABS ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
OS
Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium SP1 64-bit English for System Builders 1pk DSP OEI DVD

Total - $1154.89 ~ $1155.00

Basically, I want this computer to be able to do the occasional school work, and to play the latest games out right now (ie. Crysis, CoD4 etc) if not on high settings, then at least decently. Also, I want this rig to last me a couple of years until I need to upgrade again.

My main questions are
- Is this setup good? Is everything compatible? How would it handle demanding games such as Crysis?

-What do you think I need to change? Am I getting jipped in any of the prices?

-What OS should I use for gaming?

-What other crucial parts am I missing? Besides mouse, keyboard and monitor.

Thank you guys so much for reading all this. I really appreciate any kind of input. :bounce: 
August 23, 2008 4:59:00 AM

You've got 4 gig of ram listed. Go with a 64bit OS so you can use it all.

Might consider another HD for raid 0.

Nice setup.
August 23, 2008 5:16:43 AM

i suggest you to change the p35 mobo into p45 chipset,it's a newest mainstream chipset so it would optimize your system,my recommendation is Asus P45Q.but if u want keep the p35 chipset take Asrock p35 conroe1600 (i forget the exact name)it supports ddr2 n ddr3 ram,u can get it only about $110.happy building :) 
Related resources
August 23, 2008 5:30:21 AM

I would get the P45 asus board (p5q pro and seagate 500gb combo deal on newegg for $180) which is actually $10 less than the current 250gb hdd and p35 board.

Maybe the xigmatek S1283 cooler and a better case? (cooler master 690 perhaps?)
Anonymous
August 23, 2008 12:49:40 PM

:na:  Thanks for all the replies guys, I really appreciate it.

So to recap.

- Use Vista 64bit as OS so I can utilize all my RAM.
Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate SP1 64-bit English 1pk DSP OEI DVD for System Builders - $179.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

- Change from a p35 chipset into a p45 chipset motherboard.
How this? ASUS P5Q Deluxe LGA 775 Intel P45 Intel Motherboard - $199.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

- Better CPU cooler
XIGMATEK HDT-S1283 120mm Rifle CPU Cooler - $34.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

- Bigger/Better Case
COOLER MASTER RC-690-KKN1-GP Black SECC/ ABS ATX Mid Tower Computer Case - $84.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

And also, I'm thinking to get a e8500 for the cpu instead of my original plan of an e8600. I'm wondering is the $100 or so dollars difference in price worth it for the e8600. I hear the e8600 was a great overclocker, but as I'm just a novice when it comes to PC's; I don't think I will be overclocking anything anytime soon...maybe in the future.

But back to my old questions, how well will this new PC handle Crysis and the like?
And most importantly, is everything I'm getting compatible with each other?

Anyways, thanks a ton for all your helpful opinions. It's great to know that even as a total noob; I still have a great place where I can get honest and knowledgeable opinions. I look forward to your replies, thanks again. :bounce: 

PS - Whats is RAID 0?
August 23, 2008 3:20:31 PM

I wouldn't spend the extra on the E8600, an E8400 ($170) would probably suffice. Add in the CPU cooler and an E8400 could easily reach E8600 speeds, if you decided to overclock (which not everyone does).

Note you will want the mounting brackets for that CPU cooler and some thermal paste, Arctic Cooling MX-2 is well regarded. Although if you aren't planning to overclock at all you could just stick with the retail CPU package it comes with thermal paste already applied to the cooler and is very easy to fit, unlike some aftermarket editions. This may also save you a few dollars.

I would expect this setup should play through Crysis very nicely. I wouldn't worry too much about that! You might not be able to get the max settings in very high resolutions but you'll get somewhere close.

No reason why there should be any problems with these components either.

For RAID see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redundant_array_of_indepen...

Generally RAID 0 will make your system faster but more likely to experience instability and if one of your in the array is corrupted you will loose all your data. I'm not entirely sure how significant the performance benefits are. If you did choose a RAID solution I would recommend one that uses parity, although then you might be looking at 3 disks. Other solution - use RAID 0 and then back up the system regularly.

Hope that is useful.
Jeremy
August 23, 2008 3:54:01 PM

definitely drop the e8600 to the cheaper one...everything else seems really solid...I got vista ultimate 32 from a college for like $30 (if your school is a microsoft sponsored school, you can get all sorts of microsoft software for mad cheap)...I didn't have the smoothest experience with Vista and ended up opting out to XP...but that was just me, and I know plenty of ppl that haven't had any trouble...
Anonymous
August 23, 2008 4:09:16 PM

Thanks a lot for your inputs Jeremy and Ahslan. :sol: 

I think I'll go with the e8500 instead of the e8600 and save the $100 bucks.

As for the CPU Cooler brackets and thermal paste, would these work? I didn't realize I had to get other components for the cooler.

XIGMATEK ACK-I7751 Retention Bracket - $6.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

ARCTIC COOLING MX-2 Thermal Compound - $6.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Anyways, its great to know that such a graphically demanding game like Crysis would be able to run nicely on this setup. Well, if everything looks okay to you guys, I think I might start ordering in the parts tonight once I get the OK from my parents. haha I'm so excited. :kaola: 

By the way, thanks for the link about RAID 0, but I don't think I'm going to do that... I think I'm still a bit too green.

As always, thanks to all you guys for taking the time to read and reply to me. I am really grateful for the help you guys have provided. I'm still open to any suggestions, and continue to look forward to your replies.
August 23, 2008 7:18:10 PM

Quote:
I didn't realize I had to get other components for the cooler.

You could skip the retention bracket and thermal compound. The cooler has the stock Intel push-pin mounting system and some stock thermal compound - enough for the initial installation. (thermal compound is the plastic packet in the lower right)

The optional retention bracket is popular since it allows an easier, more effective and more secure mounting procedure.
The AC MX-2 thermal compound is great stuff, easy to apply and probably worth a degree or two better cooling than the stock compound and you'll have enough for several applications.

August 23, 2008 7:30:24 PM

Im not sure you really need the extra features of Vista Ultimate over Vista Home Premium.

Check out this comparison: Vista versions compared
Vista Home Premium 64bit SP1

Save $80 and maybe use $20 to upgrade your power supply: Corsair 750TX
I noticed that OCZ GameXStream PSU has just 2 six pin power connectors for the video card - the Corsair 750 has four of the 6+2 pin connectors. Handy if you ever get a 2nd 4870 video card.
August 23, 2008 7:33:02 PM

Also..... the ASUS P5Q Deluxe is $199, not the $129 you have listed.
And I suggest you swap out the IDE DVD burner for a SATA model Liteon Sata DVD burner The SATA data cable vs IDE data cable makes the case look a lot neater, and the SATA cable doesnt block case airflow like the wide IDE ribbon cable can.
In the P5Q Deluxe accessory pack the IDE cable is the wide black cable just above the first red SATA cable on the left side middle of picture
August 23, 2008 8:01:45 PM

You have made some good decisions and you are getting decent advice, I'd like to add:

1) Get a better data storage system. You have the budget, so why not build RAID to get data security. I assure you, there is no single worse thing in PC land than losing all your data storage so an extra drive for RAID is easy and cheap enough for the first time builder. Just get two whisper quiet WDC RAID optimized drives with at least 16M cache and 7200RPM and let your motherboard (and Windows) do the rest.

2) Your case stays with you, possibly longer than any other component. Be smart, get it bigger rather than smaller, aluminum rather than steel, slide out tray, big roomy PSU area, sturdy buttons and connectors. I have an 8 year old case that not only performs better than nearly every case today but has lasted through 6 motherboards and 4 power supplies and 7 video cards each one bigger than the one before it. Consider your case wisely.

3) PSU: I have no personal experience with that OCZ model you mentioned, I'm strictly an Enermax user. But I will say that that model only supplies 18A over the 12V rails. The safety and industry maximum is 20A, but some power supplies are providing more than that current on the 12v line, such as 22A or even higher. Modern cards, such as the 4750 require that much current so you should consider a PSU that has a higher A (amperage) rating than 18A on 12V1, 12V2, 12V3, etc. I'm sorry I don't know precisely how much amperage the 4750 draws from the PSU, I just tried checking that and came up empty, my best guess is that the card plus your other components will put you over 18A on a 12V line.

Here's a NewEgg item to consider, I use two and they are almost perfect, a Zalman Heat Pipe aluminum HDD silencer/cooler:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Can't go wrong with NewEgg either. Best of luck on your rig, partition wisely!
August 23, 2008 8:14:56 PM

Comment on WR2. The reason for the mounting bracket is that people have found the Xigmatek cooler difficult to mount, hence using the bracket to make things easier.

I would agree with a different PSU; Enermax are good if pricey or Corsair are good quality and reliable. Having a bit of extra juice on the 12V rail is no bad thing and some extra connectors would not go amiss just in case.

Jeremy
Anonymous
August 23, 2008 8:34:11 PM

Wow WR2, thank you for the very detailed replies.

I'm taking your advice and switching out the Vista Ultimate to Home Edition, you're right, I don't need all the features the Vista Ultimate has over Home Edition. Very informative article btw. I'm also getting the PSU you're recommending; I guess its always better to have a PC that is more easily upgradable in the future.

Thanks for pointing out my typo, silly me. I wish it was $129.99... and I'm changing the DVD Drive to the one you mentioned as well. I see it does what the one I originally picked out did, and more; And it it'll look neater in my case too, sweet.

Awesome, and after all these changes, I end up saving $5 bucks too.

Anyways, I'm thinking of ordering in the parts tonight; do you guys think this is the best possible, or at least close to the best, rig I can get on my $1200 - $1500 budget?

As always, thanks a lot for all the advice you guys. To be honest, I didn't count on there being so much helpful and knowledgeable replies. You guys are the best.
August 23, 2008 8:35:30 PM

As others mentioned, you can very modestly and safely overclock the e8x00 series CPUs higher than any of the stock e8X00 speeds; for this reason I'd go with the 8400 since it's the cheapest.

A big difference in the ASUS P5Q 45 mobos seems to be in the PCI and expansion slots, although there are other dissimilarities. I noticed since you only listed a single radeon 4870, you may be able to satisfy all your needs with a P5Q SE for half price (but no crossfire) or a P5Q Pro for scarcely more and crossfire 8x. The deluxe just seems overkill to me unless you have a specific reason.

Excellent RAM but you may want to consider DDr2 1066 memory (I think G.Skill and OCZ are good) if you plan to overclock your CPU. I don't know enough about OC'ing RAM to say anything about it, but I have a feeling yours may be good for that too.

If you do plan to go crossfire with another 4870, you will need a bigger PSU.

VisionTek has a lifetime warranty for the 4870; not sure if powercooler does or not.
Anonymous
August 23, 2008 9:37:05 PM

:bounce:  Thanks for all the replies guys.

@bf2gameplaya


Though I would love to be able to have more data security, I'm still pretty much a novice when it comes to building PC's. This is the first time I'm attempting something like this, and I'm afraid if I make things too complicated; I might screw things up. But, would I be able to build RAID in the future for my PC if I choose to, without losing my data? It might be something I would consider once I get enough experience.

On the issue of the PSU, WR2 suggested that I changed from the OCZ model into a Corsair 750TX. What do you think? I believe it reads +12V@60A; but I might be mistaken.

Corsair 750TX
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

As for the case, I'm all good for getting more room. But do you think my case is big enough? The physical specs of the one I thinking of getting now are, 20.7" x 8.4" x 19" - which is much larger than what I'm currently using at home. What do you recommend?

@Jeremy

Thanks for your input from before, it was indeed very helpful. :) 
But on the topic of the PSU as well, do you think the Corsair 750TX is a good alternative for the one I had before? Does it have enough power? And I believe WR2 mentioned it has more connectors than the OCZ PSU I originally planned on getting. So that's a good thing I guess.

@milkshake

If that's the case where I can safely overclock an e8400 to higher speeds than the stock speeds; then I will very much consider getting it, I'm all ears when I can save some money. But, is it hard/safe to overclock? I hear people overclocking their CPU's to insane speeds but never really had the chance to do it myself.

Is the motherboard that much of an overkill? :na:  I don't know if I want to eventually Crossfire two Radeon 4870's; but I don't want to eliminate my ability to do so. But what would you suggest if you were in my situation? And just out of curiosity, if I ever do want to Crossfire two Radeon 4870's, do I have to have it be an exact same card, or can I get a 4870 from VisionTek and one from Powercolor?

As for the RAM; do you think it will be an issue in the future if I overclock my CPU but stick to my original plan and use this?

CORSAIR 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Once again, thank you guys so much for your honest opinions. You've made my first attempt at PC building so much easier.



August 24, 2008 3:24:06 PM

The 750TX could be considered overkill really. Gives a bit of headroom for later upgrade.

I'd just like to reiterate about RAID 0 that if you loose either drive in the array because there is no parity you will permanently lose all of your data. If you have a good backup routine to an external HDD then this isn't really a problem. IF you have good backup.....
You could use RAID 1 which makes 2 copies of everything over two disks but this won't give you any speed boost.

Re Crossfire. In my experience if you don't start with a dual graphics card machine and you aren't intending to put a second card in straight away then you are very unlikely every to crossfire. By the time you get round to it there will be faster cards on the market for a good price that may well outperform a crossfire solution.
Although if there is very little difference in non-Xfire and Xfire I would take the Xfire board. Depends if you want to save money or not!

Jeremy
August 24, 2008 6:09:28 PM

That corsair DDR2 800Mhz RAM would allow you to get to 3.6 GHz with an e8400 and you may not even need to turn up the voltage. That's very fast and considered stable for that chip...you would only need DDR21066 if you wanted to go past that (e8400 goes well past 4.0) but kind of overkill for normal purposes.

I just think that for the price range of the P5Q Deluxe (200$) you would be doing yourself better to look into the x38/x48 motherboards which are a step up in terms of supporting multiple GPU's. To me, crossfire/SLI require more power/heat/price than what they offer in performance versus single GPU setups....the 4870 will handle any game very well, most on highest settings, you just won't be able to max crysis and a few other titles. Many smarter/more knowledgeable people would disagree though.

My vote is e8400+ASUS P5Q Pro+Corsair 750TX PSU+VisionTek4870.
August 24, 2008 8:28:18 PM

Not a bad vote milkshake. I'd back that.

Had we discussed quad core options? It would be possible to add a small overclock on a Q6600 and be knocking on the door of dual core performance, especially with that Xigmatek heat sink.
Just another option really.

Jeremy
August 24, 2008 10:19:33 PM

Quote:
:bounce:  Thanks for all the replies guys.

@bf2gameplaya


Though I would love to be able to have more data security, I'm still pretty much a novice when it comes to building PC's. This is the first time I'm attempting something like this, and I'm afraid if I make things too complicated; I might screw things up. But, would I be able to build RAID in the future for my PC if I choose to, without losing my data? It might be something I would consider once I get enough experience.

On the issue of the PSU, WR2 suggested that I changed from the OCZ model into a Corsair 750TX. What do you think? I believe it reads +12V@60A; but I might be mistaken.

Corsair 750TX
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

As for the case, I'm all good for getting more room. But do you think my case is big enough? The physical specs of the one I thinking of getting now are, 20.7" x 8.4" x 19" - which is much larger than what I'm currently using at home. What do you recommend?


No RAID for you first time around? Not a problem, just don't put anything on a disk you don't care if you can't ever get back. (not that RAID guarantees perfect data) you can always add another drive later, just make sure your first drive is easy to find in a year.

That's a honking PSU, 60A on one rail can handle most any CPU and GPU combo you throw at it or can afford, plus free shipping and the price is right.

Those are decent case dimensions, the 19" length is critical as video cards are at least 9" long and connectors can stick out of them several inches including wires.

Carry on!


Anonymous
August 24, 2008 11:13:31 PM

Wow, thanks for all the great advice guys; I actually just put in the order to Newegg about 8 hours ago this morning, right before I went out and way before I read these replies. As of now, what I'm currently ordering is

Processor
Intel Core 2 Duo E8400 Wolfdale 3.0GHz 6MB L2 Cache LGA 775 65W Dual-Core Processor
Processor Cooler
XIGMATEK HDT-S1283 120mm Rifle CPU Cooler
Processor Cooler Bracket
XIGMATEK ACK-I7751 Retention Bracket
Thermal Compound
ARCTIC COOLING MX-2 Thermal Compound
Motherboard
ASUS P5Q-E LGA 775 Intel P45 ATX Intel Motherboard
Video Card
POWERCOLOR AX4870 512MD5-PPH Radeon HD 4870 512MB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFire Supported Video Card
RAM
CORSAIR 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory
Hard Drive
Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 ST3500630AS 500GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive - OEM
Power Supply
CORSAIR CMPSU-750TX 750W ATX12V / EPS12V NVIDIA SLI Ready ATI CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS Certified Active PFC Power Supply
DVD Drive
LITE-ON Black 20X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 8X DVD+R DL 20X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 12X DVD-RAM 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 32X CD-RW 48X CD-ROM 2MB Cache SATA 20X DVD±R DVD Burner - OEM
Case
COOLER MASTER RC-690-KKN1-GP Black SECC/ ABS ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
OS
Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium SP1 64-bit English for System Builders 1pk DSP OEI DVD

I believe all I changed was the motherboard and the hard drive. Late last night, I think WR2 also suggested that the P5Q Deluxe was overkill and suggested I change it to a P5Q-E; where I can still keep my crossfire options open, save $40, but not lose out on that many major features the Deluxe had to offer. (It's weird that I can't seem to find his post now.)

And as for the hard drive, I figured 250gb seemed to be on the low side, so I changed it into a 500gb one.

This whole build came out to be $1,193.32(shipping included), which, I'm quite surprised to say, is below my original budget of $1200-$1500.

So unless there is any last minute changes you guys think I should make, or you guys see any major compatibility errors; I think its Mission Accomplished for me. :sol: 

Also, I just wanted to say that all you guys are the best, you made my first PC building experience go so smoothly. And I know you're all probably tired of hearing this from me, but I really appreciated all the help you guys gave me. Really. :bounce: 
August 25, 2008 1:54:46 PM

ehh weird, all my posts are now under the name "Anonymous."
August 25, 2008 5:08:55 PM

There was forum maintenance activity Saturday and it probably happened then.
Also several posts are missing - including the P5Q SE / P5Q-E / P5Q Deluxe discussion.

A few things you can do while waiting on the UPS guy. Get as many of the manuals as you can find to download (especially the motherboard) and start reviewing them. You can find the MFGRs website through the items listed on NewEgg on the Manufacturer Info tab in the bottom left.
Find a review or two on your major components: Asus P5Q-E (P45) Motherboard Corsair TX750

Looking over a Vista tweak guide is probably a good idea; http://www.tweakguides.com/VA_1.html
Basic security software; AVG anti-virus - Zone Alarm Firewall - Windows Defender Anti-Spyware

August 25, 2008 8:55:02 PM

Thanks WR2, thats not a bad idea. I'm definitely going to do that. But, just wondering, how long do you think it will take for a complete beginner like me to put everything together with no assistance at all? What would I have to watch out for, is there a lot of room for error? Basically, what I'm most afraid of, is accidentally breaking a delicate part unknowingly, shorting out the motherboard or whatnot.

Also, another option I was thinking of lately was maybe taking all these parts to a PC shop and asking them to put it together for me. The few shops I've asked all charge about $90-$100; which is a bit steep, but not a problem. However, what's keeping me from taking this route is the possibility of the people in the shops taking my parts or subbing in crap ones... because all the shops I asked said they can't let me watch them put it together; which is understandable but doesn't help my fear.

So basically, I'm also asking you guys, if there's a way for me to check in the BIOS or something (I don't know), for the serial numbers or model numbers of the parts I gave to them to install; besides having to open the case itself, which is also always an option...
August 26, 2008 3:58:09 PM

Each of your parts should have the MFGR/Part Number and Serial number on the packing - except maybe for the OEM HDD and DVD burner. And you can see those Part Numbers in the BIOS and in the System Properties through Windows. It seems to me it would be easy to detect if a computer tech changed out parts on you.

Depending on your comfort level, and how many times you have to look at the manuals an average build might take 30 minutes at the low end to 90 minutes at the high end. Thats with having already opened the boxes, looked over the instructions, looked over the parts to compare the instructions with the actual parts, etc.

Building a PC isnt all that difficult but you only have to read the forum topics to see all the "builds gone wrong" help requests. Problems range from parts arriving DOA or failing on power on (some figures suggest up to 10% initial failure rate) to build errors. Like failing to install the motherboard standoff screws and so allowing the motherboard to touch the metal of the case tray and shorting out when the power is turned on.
Build success is hard to judge. Some people we'd never guess would succeed have zero problems, others with extremely high levels of knowledge and good prior experience have horrible problems.

The major advantage a computer shop tech has (apart from his knowledge and experience) is the tools and parts to troubleshoot any initial issues. If he suspects a possible hardware problem he has known good parts in the shop to swap out and continue testing.

There is an immense amount of satisfaction in doing it yourself of course. And you do end up learning quite a bit.
You could always give it a whack. And if the ride gets bumpy you could always go to plan B and look for help at a local computer shop.
!