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Why don't manufacturers test thier crap?

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August 24, 2008 7:09:03 PM

Why don't the manufactures do some sort of burn in testing before shipping parts? how much would it ad to the price?

I've never had a CPU arrive DOA, but I assume they do some sort of testing when they bin the parts.

but my person DOA/quick failure rate is astoundingly bad for memory, vid cards (last 2 have been good) and most of all, motherboards. its not that I buy cheap crap either. my last 2 motherbards have been top of the line HTPC Gigabyte boards. the first died before I was able to install the OS, the second died after just of a month of virtual non-use, days over the RMA limit, now I've got to deal with a factory warantee.
August 24, 2008 7:40:31 PM

Because testing takes time, which the manufacturers can't afford and neither can we.
August 24, 2008 7:47:00 PM

also becuase... They already know its crap before they decide to test it ;) 
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August 24, 2008 8:11:55 PM

It's made in china ergo crap.
a b B Homebuilt system
August 25, 2008 1:23:09 AM

Think of it this way, look how cheaply you get it. If they test, they have to pay someone for their time to test, IE you pay more. So I think myself I'm willing to risk a DOA part once in a while to get lower prices, I haven't gotten too many doa's either.
August 25, 2008 1:42:40 AM

SirCrono said:
Because testing takes time, which the manufacturers can't afford and neither can we.



Exactly his point! If you can't afford time, then why do you spend time on something that it might not work, then spend more time troubleshooting to find what is wrong and then spend even more time taking it back to RMA, then wait for a replacement and then again spend more time to put the replacement in and cross your fingers that this time it will work. If not... well... spend some extra time to do all this over again!

I agree with the author, only it is THEIR time and not THIER. hehe...

I would rather pay $20 extra to have something tested and increase the chances of it working straight off the box, rather than spending endless hours troubleshooting and in the end giving up, waiting for an RMA without a working computer, because someone decided not to test it.

An extra $20 on top of the time and money that i have already spent on troubleshooting and pulling my hair out is absolutely nothing and justified!
August 25, 2008 2:37:13 AM

DOA once and a while?????

how about once or twice a build on average. I have NEVER had a "clean" build.

my current build is a total nightmare. I've come across bad memory, 2 bad motherboards, an old PSU failure, an old mouse die, a bad eSATA converter, and an old OS that always leaves me pulling out my hair. I am using OB video, so I'm not having vid card problems this time. I still haven't even ordered the more exotic parts yet, because I want to sart off with a good stable system first.

an extra $20 for a known good mobo would be well worth it, and testing should cost less than that.
a b B Homebuilt system
August 25, 2008 3:31:24 AM

Now on my last 2 builds I've had relatively few problems. My current build, very little to complain about. The one before that, I think I had problems because of a very very low quality PSU, I kind of think it fried the motherboard. But the vendor made it right so all was well. But when you are doing homebuilds you can expect that. Also not every guy knows how to really put things together safely. You can have a motherboard that you know for a fact is good and then somebody touch it wrong and zap it because of ESD or something along those lines. You can have the best parts and if you don't know how to install things, think that your pc is junk vs another guy may get bargain basement parts, but know what he's doing and never have a problem.

Typically though if you buy decent parts to begin with, you don't have as many problems. If you buy lower end parts, probably a little more likely to have problems. The biggest problem on my current build I've had was a stick of ram seems to have overheated and went bad. The other thing was I added an add in NIC card because I was having internet connectivity problems. But now I can't honestly say if it was a problem with the mobo's card or not because they've had to do repairs here to get the situation rectified after internet completely shut down for a period of time.
August 25, 2008 5:29:47 AM

only DOA i've had was on eBay all my parts always work out of the box.
August 25, 2008 11:39:13 AM

groo said:
DOA once and a while?????

how about once or twice a build on average. I have NEVER had a "clean" build.

my current build is a total nightmare. I've come across bad memory, 2 bad motherboards, an old PSU failure, an old mouse die, a bad eSATA converter, and an old OS that always leaves me pulling out my hair. I am using OB video, so I'm not having vid card problems this time. I still haven't even ordered the more exotic parts yet, because I want to sart off with a good stable system first.

an extra $20 for a known good mobo would be well worth it, and testing should cost less than that.


I've had one bad Dimm (Out of 4 Dimms) for the parts for my last build.
That was the only bad part I received in the last 6-7 that I have built.

You must have some really bad luck but if you are not already doing so..............

#1 - Buy Reputable Brands, not cheap no name.
#2 - Avoid Open Box.
#3 - Be more careful about Static.
#4 - Consider Purchasing from a Local Computer Reseller. It will make the Return Process Easier if you luck is that bad.
August 26, 2008 6:23:26 PM

I have to agree with Zenmaster...you have to be doing something wrong. I have been doing builds for people for 6 years at an average of 4-5 boxes a year (I know, nothing major) but the worst I have had is 1 set of 2x1gb DDR2 that was DOA.

Computer hardware doesn't require a sterile clean-room and rubber gloves, but seriously, tell the FedEx guy to stop using your boxes as trampolines.

:) 
August 27, 2008 12:35:10 PM

#1 I build with the goal of ending up with better quality, so I always go for quality on the major components
#2 never bought open box.
#3 the only static I encounter during builds is from the packing peanuts, but thats seams to disipate fairly quick once rhe shipping box is opened.
#4 I tried that before I found newegg for my first build (cbw across town) It didn't go well. the local mon-n-pops are usualy a generation behind and double the price of etailers. not to mention the whole store hours thing, I work an afternoon shift and go to school.

I personaly feal overjoyed if FedEx actualy finds the house (dont ask my why they cant, its not hard) or UPS knocks on the door

I don't think its me, because I've swapped cases and motherboards a couple of times without problems.

I know it's luck, I'm very unlucky about some things (like always being picked for random drug tests, at least passing isn't a problem), but a little quality assurance would go a long way.
August 27, 2008 4:40:49 PM

Manufacturers generally take a random sample from a production batch to test. If the sample passes all tests then it is assumed that the entire batch is fine. A random sample could be 1% - 5% of the production batch.

If the manufacturer was to test each and every component, then it would probably led to a significant increase to overall production costs. Maybe 10% - 20% increase? That's why random samples are taken.

There are some manufacturers that do perform "burn-in" testing for their high end product. The only ones I know of are NEC and Eizo. Since their professional monitors tend sell for over $1,000 they make the extra effort to test each and every one of those monitors.

Some on-line stores like www.mwave.com offers an option to test all components before shipping for a nominal amount and will probably add 1 or 2 days to the shipping time.
August 27, 2008 4:41:54 PM

For the record, I suppose I have been fortunate enough to never have recieved a single component that was DOA.
August 27, 2008 7:03:44 PM

Ive had mostly issues with video cards, both Nvidia and ATI over the years. Number for that is at 4 and counting, 2 ATIs and 2 Nvidias.

Never had issues with Gigabyte or Asus mobos. I have had to flash BIOS's upon receiving a board to fix an issue though.

Never had issues with Corsair or Mushkin RAM. Did have one stick of Corsair go bad on me after 6 months or so. Corsair is top notch in the warranty department and sent me new RAM, no questions asked.

HDs are usually Seagate, but Ive used WD in the past . No issues with either. Had an IBM Deskstar go south on me after 2 months though, but those had really high failure rates.

I consider CD and DVD drives pretty much throw away at $20 a pop anymore. But I usually buy Sony or LG drives. I will not buy a Plextor burner anymore. Both of my last 2 failed after about a year. Next burner will be either a Pioneer or LG.

I never scrimp on PSUs. Ive been using PC Power and Cooling and Enermax for years with no issues. Next build will be using a Corsair.





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