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Probably Every Benchmark You'd Ever Need

Last response: in Overclocking
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November 16, 2009 8:35:13 AM

hm.. thanks for info..
a b K Overclocking
November 16, 2009 9:10:17 AM

Where's 3D Mark 2001, the last great product from Futuremark? :cry: 
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a c 197 K Overclocking
November 16, 2009 9:27:30 AM

Thanks. One stop shopping ...
a c 231 K Overclocking
November 16, 2009 10:03:03 AM

randomizer said:
Where's 3D Mark 2001, the last great product from Futuremark? :cry: 


It may still be available in Futuremarks crusty old archive, but its not supported anymore, but you already know that, right?
a b K Overclocking
November 17, 2009 12:56:54 AM

4Ryan6 said:
It may still be available in Futuremarks crusty old archive, but its not supported anymore, but you already know that, right?

Of course, but it's the only benchmark that makes my PC look really fast. :sol: 
a c 231 K Overclocking
November 17, 2009 9:42:26 AM

randomizer said:
Of course, but it's the only benchmark that makes my PC look really fast. :sol: 


:lol: 
November 20, 2009 11:26:27 PM

whats the risk with benchmarks?
a b K Overclocking
November 20, 2009 11:29:13 PM

Loss of epeen thanks to a low score, and possibly overheating, but that's unlikely unless you have no fans in your case.
November 20, 2009 11:40:00 PM

lol. that's why your the moderator
December 11, 2009 3:54:33 AM

This is good! Thanks for the link!
December 24, 2009 5:16:54 AM

jajajaj, how many cats are here, i love cats
December 29, 2009 11:46:55 PM

Hurm...seem that I can try my newly OCed Q8400 (3.06GHz -just a minor OC though...please don't laugh)
January 29, 2010 12:59:55 PM

I just got a Q9400. Anyone OC this yet with success?
a c 231 K Overclocking
February 25, 2010 11:02:27 AM

WARNING

Since I am the one that posted these benchmark programs here I feel the need to also throw in some caution about using these seriously stressing programs that are used for stress testing your overclock like Prime95 for example.

First of all there are different routes to go with various CPUs to successfully overclock them, if you're the owner of a CPU with an unlocked multiplier and your path to overclock is simply raising the CPU multiplier and Vcore voltage and not taking your FSB out of spec at all, once you find the proper Vcore to run the raised multiplier, serious long term stress testing is flat out not necessary.

If your raised multiplier and Vcore voltage aren't in the pocket then you won't even complete 3DM06, however your FSB settings are default settings so there is no instability there, the only instability is using the exact Vcore to match the multiplier and that's done by trial and error rebooting until you discover the sweet spot relation between multiplier and Vcore, and you're there.

When you're overclocking a locked multiplier CPU, its a lot more complicated juggling voltages, FSB speed, PLL, VTT, GTL Etc., so stress testing is definitely necessary in those situations, because you're changing and manipulating the set specifications of the hardware communication and the new settings you choose have to be tested to ensure they're stable.

However and here is the Caution; I seriously question the need for all this 24hr testing going on your brand new CPU, I see numerous cases here at THGF of guys bragging about their 24hr stress testing, or saying someones overclock is not stable because they haven't benched for 24 hrs.

A stress test is running all of your CPU cores flat out for however long you run the test, unless of course a core drops out because your overclock is unstable, I see the need for short term testing say an hour or so, because it won't take that long for an unstable overclock to show itself, but 24hrs is not necessary.

There is not a thing on this planet designed to last forever, your precious CPU included when companies like Intel and AMD, guarantee their CPUs for 3 yr warranty time period, they're confident their CPUs will actually go past that time period, however that calculation is based on 3 yrs and beyond of normal use.

They know their CPUs are capable of lasting under normal spec'd use longer than the 3 yrs or they would not warranty them that long.

Now the cold hard fact is that overclocking your CPU will shorten its lifespan, but we accept that for the additional speed we gain, most of us will replace that cpu with an upgrade before is life expectancy arrives anyway, so taking it out of specifications is acceptable.

However that's with normal day to day use, surfing the web, audio and video editing and converting, gaming, office documentation Etc, and though serious bench stress testing is necessary to achieve a stable overclock, what damage does stress testing over a 24 hr time period actually do to shorten the lifespan of your new CPU.

For example if you stress test your new quad core CPU for 24hrs, and all 4 cores are running at 100% for 24 hrs, how much normal daily processing is lost, because no daily application uses all 4 cores at 100%, so at least think about that when you overclock your CPU, and use at least some kind of wisdom in your stress testing.

Because if you don't think you're adding to shortening the life of your CPU, you're wrong! Ryan
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