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CPU temp questions

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November 16, 2009 8:02:20 PM

Currently I have my i7 950 at 3800 Mhz at 1.25 voltage and all the rest of the settings are at auto. It idles between 28C and 31C but then when I run prime 95 on small ffts it jumps to about 60C instantly and then slowly rises to about 74C which is to hot for these chips. My cooler is a Zalman CNPS9900LED, so I have a good cooler and I put the thermal paste on according to the arctic silver website. The cooler also goes to full rpm, about 2k I think when it gets that hot. I really want to get this passed 4.0Ghz on air. I dont feel like spending the money at this time on water cooling.

Computer Specs:
i7 950 @ 3.8
EVGA SLI classified
Zalman CNPS9900LED cooler
Thermaltake Speedo advanced package case

Any help is greatly appreciated

More about : cpu temp questions

a b K Overclocking
November 16, 2009 10:14:01 PM

1. The 9900 is an old tech cooler by the new standards. The new HDT coolers like the Core Contact Freezer are the new kings of the hill.

2. Try reducing vcore and/or speed.
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November 16, 2009 10:39:03 PM

I did some research and found out that the max temp for the i7's with D0 stepping is 85C. My i7 has D0 stepping and its maxing at 84C with small ffts at 1.375 voltage at 4.2Ghz. I will look into a new cooler though, what are some suggestions?

EDIT:

I found these five

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
I know I will need fans for this one, but thats ok

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

The first two are the only ones with the HDT core contact. Even though the last ones are good, is it even worth buying those ones when the first two have the HDT on them? is there that much difference in cooling performance?



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a b K Overclocking
November 16, 2009 11:32:13 PM

^ I was talking about the 120mm Core Contact btw ;) 

Here are the links:
CCF 120mm: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$20 after MIR

CCF LGA1366 bracket:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$5 after MIR

That heat sink has the best price vs performance imo. If you want more cooling performance add a Scythe Slipstream 110 CFM fan, which should drop temps up to 7C.

Top heat sink review site: http://www.frostytech.com/top5heatsinks.cfm
The Core Contact is ranked #4.
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November 17, 2009 1:36:36 AM

I will be considering that one because of the good price. But price isnt to much of an issue for cooling. Atleast for a heatsink that is. I want the best air cooling performance I can get. How would it be if I added two of those fans to that heatsink? or two of those fans to whatever the best heatink is that has the contact cooling on it. I do like the 3R system one.

EDIT:
Well I just read up on the 3R one and noticed that it doesnt seem to be sold in the US

Ive decided one two that I am considering

http://www.frozencpu.com/products/9209/cpu-ttn-03/Titan...

and

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I just need a fan for the 2nd one. Can the speed of all fans be adjusted through the MOBO if the MOBO supports that? with my zalman cooler, it automatically adjusts the speed depending on the temp. If I get that fan will it still be adjusted automatically?
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a b K Overclocking
November 17, 2009 2:17:55 PM

csflame4432 said:
I did some research and found out that the max temp for the i7's with D0 stepping is 85C.

csflame4432 ,

Where did you read this? I hope it wasn't here at Tom's. I'd really like to know.

You've now posted this on 2 threads :(  ... I seriously hope there aren't any others. :heink: 

Intel has no such "max temp 85c" specification for any Core i7 variant. Whatever you read was based upon speculation rather than specification. Just to keep our readers from becoming more confused :pt1cable:  than they already are, I am emphatically stating, for the record, that this information is wrong and misleading.

No disrespect intended, but please, do not spread FUD! :non:  It just takes a few forum members to grab that ball and run with it, which will multiply like cockroaches, making my work here at Tom's much more difficult, having to also stomp out yet another misconception.

I have already addressed this issue in your previous thread: Overclocking i7 950 - http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/255264-29-overclockin...

Once again, my objective is to assure that enthusiasts understand Intel's specifications, standards and test methods, so they can better decide how to apply and manage their overclocking options.

From Intel's Processor Spec Finder - http://processorfinder.intel.com/List.aspx?ParentRadio=...

All Core i7 9xx variants:

Vcore Max 1.375v
Tcase Max (CPU temperature) 68c
Tjunction (Core temperature) 73c

The Thermal Specification shown in Intel's Processor Spec Finder is Tcase Max (CPU) not Tjunction (Core), which is a very common misconception among most enthusiasts. Since there's a 5c gradient between the CPU sensor and the Core sensors, (shown in the following Intel document) - http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/0709/0709.1861.pdf - just add 5c to the value shown in the Spec Finder to determine the corresponding Core temperature, which is 73c for all Core i7 9xx variants.

Intel's second and frequently misunderstood Thermal Specification, Tjunction Max, (100c for all Core i7 9xx variants) applies to overtemp protection such as Throttle and Shutdown, so you don't toast your transistors. As such, any i7 9xx Core temperatures which exceed 73c should be considered "overtemp". Further, when specifications are exceeded, then processor degradation becomes a concern, which is explained in the following AnandTech article - http://anandtech.com/cpuchipsets/intel/showdoc.aspx?i=3...

Comp :sol: 
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a b K Overclocking
November 17, 2009 3:43:33 PM

^+1. I was going to correct it but I didn't think it was worth my time (or your time Comp) if people still don't understand this. It's not our stuff. Let them fry their stuff. The C2D/i7 temp guide has more than enough info.

@OP: If price really isn't an issue, why not get the Prolimatech Megahalems?
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a b K Overclocking
November 17, 2009 4:59:39 PM

Shadow703793 said:
^+1. I was going to correct it but I didn't think it was worth my time (or your time Comp) if people still don't understand this.

Actually, this is well worth my time, because down the road, I don't want to be clicking around the forums chasing down dozens of "OK to run i7 9xx at 85c" threads. Since processor temperature is such an unnecessarily complex topic, unless Intel re-words their specifications so they're clear to everyone, and includes a simple spec sheet in the retail box, there will always be newcomers who don't understand, especially as very few read my Guide or know where to find Intel's specifications.
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November 17, 2009 5:12:14 PM

I saw it on some other forum, dont worry this post was posted before you replied to the other one, so i wasnt posting something that you already addressed. I already knew about the temp guide, but I saw that post about the D0 stepping and thought maybe it was true. Now I know its not
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November 17, 2009 5:23:52 PM

I did look at the megahelms, but I like the HDT ones better.
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a b K Overclocking
November 17, 2009 5:26:45 PM

csflame4432 said:
I saw it on some other forum

So it was someone elsewhere than at Tom's Forums spewing FUD witout any facts or links to back it up, correct?
csflame4432 said:
I saw that post about the D0 stepping and thought maybe it was true. Now I know its not

Don't take my word for it, or anyone else's. If you click on the link I provided above to Intel's Processor Spec Finder, you can see for yourself that regardless of C0 or D0 Stepping, all Core i7 9xx variants have exactly the same voltage and thermal specifications.
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November 17, 2009 5:47:25 PM

Yes it was at another forum
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a b K Overclocking
November 17, 2009 9:25:44 PM

Yes, you've already said that, but do you remember anything else about it?
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a b K Overclocking
November 17, 2009 9:55:38 PM

csflame4432 said:
Here we go, I found it

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=22...

Thank you very much for finding that thread. :D  I just read through it, and it has some very bad advice. The member in question thinks that the CPU temperature sensor is still the old thermocouple-in-the-socket touching the underside of the CPU, which hasn't been the case for many years since before single cores became dinosaurs. He doesn't understand that the CPU temperature sensor is integrated into the processor package substrate layers, and clearly doesn't understand Intel's specifications.

Thanks again. :sol: 

I'm a member there, so I'll clear up those misconceptions ASAP.
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November 17, 2009 9:59:46 PM

No problem, thank you for your help
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a b K Overclocking
November 18, 2009 1:08:17 AM

You're very welcome. :sol: 
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a c 86 K Overclocking
May 1, 2010 9:16:29 PM

Think this thread is kinda done. It's 6 months old.

I'm happy for your new cooler I guess.

And stating your temps with no mention of fans, case, ambient temps, CPU, voltages, and overclocks means absolutely nothing.
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