Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

E6600 overclock help (newbie)

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
November 24, 2009 7:08:26 PM

Anyone with a good knowledge in OC'ing willing to walk me through towards successfully running to 3.0-3.4 stable? I have no idea what I am doing and simply reading tutorials is just making me more confused...

I have provided screens of my bios.

Just need to know what to change, and what programs I need to run to check stability.

Specs:
Mobo - EVGA 650i Ultra
CPU - Intel E6600
CPU Cooler - Arctic Freezer Pro 7
RAM - GSKILL DDR2-800 4gb
vCard - SAPPHIRE 4780x2 2GB
PSU - CORSAIR TX650W

BIOS screens:
http://img132.imageshack.us/i/p1020808.jpg/
http://img25.imageshack.us/i/p1020804y.jpg/
http://img43.imageshack.us/i/p1020805q.jpg/
http://img43.imageshack.us/i/p1020806k.jpg/
http://img195.imageshack.us/i/p1020807.jpg/

Thanks in advanced!

More about : e6600 overclock newbie

a b å Intel
a c 197 K Overclocking
November 24, 2009 8:59:37 PM

It doesn't work that way. Overclocking is a juggling match between CPU, CPU voltage, CPU temperatures, memory performance, stability, and cooler and case characteristics.

I can give you a starting point, but I (and the other 12 people who looked at this thread) expect you to do some of your own work. Two reasons for that: it will be very tedious to hand hold you every step of the way.Second, all systems - even similar ones - will act differently because of tiny variations in the microelectronics.

Plus, once you know how to overclock and test one system, with the appropriate guide, you can overclock anything. :) 

This should be your first stop.
HOWTO: Overclock C2Q (Quads) and C2D (Duals) - Guide v1.6.1
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/240001-29-howto-overc...

This should be your second stop. You need to know something about thermal management or you can fry your CPU. It's actually kind of difficult to fry a modern CPU, but it is possible.
Core 2 Quad and Duo Temperature Guide
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/221745-29-sticky-core...

Third stop will be a guide for your particular motherboard. Google is your friend.

If you don't have many hits, google "680i overclock". THe two motherboards have similar BIOS's

For anything higher than about 3.0 GHz, you will need better cooling. Here are two under $50 heatsinks that are pretty popular:
Sunbeam
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Xigmatec Dark Knight
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

They both require a somewhat different approach to applying thermal compound.
Suggestions for applying thermal compound:
http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...

And they are pretty large, so they might not fit inside your case.

And here's a good budget cooler:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Based on my experience (E6600 in an eVGA 680i motherboard), the ACF7P is going to limit you to around 3.2 - 3.3 GHz.

Go through the first two threads. Do not do anything until you have a good idea about what you are trying to do. Once you have definite questions (you will, you will :) ), come back and ask.

Keep in mind that these are guides, not cookbooks. YMMV. Your Mileage May Vary. Because of all the variables, you may not do as well as someone else with a similar system. Or you might do better.

Keep your CPU voltages under 1.5 volts and your core temps under 70 C.

A good testing progam is Prime95. THe small fft test will load both CPU's to 100%. CoreTemp is a good temperature monitor program. CPU-Z is good for analyzing your settings.
----------
Overclocking since 1978 - Z80 (TRS-80) from 1.77 MHz to 2.01 MHz


m
0
l
!