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These Seagate 7200.12 1TB HD TUNE PRO screens are normal???

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February 10, 2010 1:30:14 PM

Hi, please answer me these questions:

Q1: in the health screen there are two yellow things, is normal?

Q2: are these speed in benchmark screen normal? my 500gb disk is more faster!!!

Q3: are the random access screen normal? i think not, because haves high ms points...




February 10, 2010 2:27:49 PM

please answer faster, i have only 1 day to return the hard drive to the shop...
February 10, 2010 3:20:18 PM

Everything looks good to me.
This is a 1g caviar black drive.




Why are those lines highlighted in yellow? Probably a flag by Seagates own
firmware working with the smart data. Nothing to worry about.

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February 10, 2010 3:38:11 PM

thx, some more oppinions?
February 10, 2010 4:03:21 PM

check the third screen, haves a lot of points near 100 ms... this is normal?
February 10, 2010 6:38:49 PM

no one?
February 10, 2010 7:53:50 PM

guys!
February 10, 2010 8:19:36 PM

Seriously calm down. Run seagate wintools on the drive.
http://www.seagate.com/ww/v/index.jsp?locale=en-US&name...

SeaTools for Windows
SeaTools for Windows has replaced SeaTools Online and PowerMax. SeaTools for Windows is a comprehensive, easy-to-use diagnostic tool that helps you quickly determine the condition of the disc drive in your external hard drive, desktop or notebook computer. It includes several tests that will examine the physical media on your Seagate or Maxtor disc drive and any other non-Seagate disc drive.
http://www.seagate.com/ww/v/index.jsp?locale=en-US&name...

edit: I used this on my drives, I heard the short test spin my raptor up and down in a way, I've never heard during normal use, interesting. all passed.
February 10, 2010 8:21:50 PM

notty22 said:
Seriously calm down. Run seagate wintools on the drive.
http://www.seagate.com/ww/v/index.jsp?locale=en-US&name...

SeaTools for Windows
SeaTools for Windows has replaced SeaTools Online and PowerMax. SeaTools for Windows is a comprehensive, easy-to-use diagnostic tool that helps you quickly determine the condition of the disc drive in your external hard drive, desktop or notebook computer. It includes several tests that will examine the physical media on your Seagate or Maxtor disc drive and any other non-Seagate disc drive.
http://www.seagate.com/ww/v/index.jsp?locale=en-US&name...


its done and no errors found

but, please, answer to my 3 questions, i see other screens like these 3 with other hard drives and does not have these things bad like in screen 3
a b G Storage
February 10, 2010 8:43:36 PM

Bad? Nope. It's fine. All of your test results look normal. There's nothing to worry about.
February 10, 2010 8:59:08 PM

cjl said:
Bad? Nope. It's fine. All of your test results look normal. There's nothing to worry about.


random acces too? check these lot of points near 100 ms... in my 500GB seagate does not happen these points on this test
a b G Storage
February 10, 2010 11:12:17 PM

A few points up near 100ms aren't that unusual when the drive being tested is the system drive. As long as the averages are within reasonable ranges (and yours are), you're fine.
February 11, 2010 6:19:13 AM

cjl said:
A few points up near 100ms aren't that unusual when the drive being tested is the system drive. As long as the averages are within reasonable ranges (and yours are), you're fine.


its not the system drive!!! it's an empty drive :S
February 11, 2010 11:38:41 AM

up
a b G Storage
February 11, 2010 11:52:14 AM

Empty as in unformatted?
Else Windows can still access the drive. You can check disk access with Disk Monitor in HD Tune Pro.
a b G Storage
February 11, 2010 6:36:31 PM

saezito said:
its not the system drive!!! it's an empty drive :S

It's still fine. As I said before, the average is what matters.

Oh, and how many times are we going to have to tell you that it's fine before you accept that fact?
February 11, 2010 9:31:08 PM

Saezito, stop freaking out.
February 12, 2010 6:00:39 AM


Yeah, looks normal though... wait between 3 to 9 months, and it will die suddenly...

Seagate with 7200.12 - Relocated sector count error and spin try count error is now all over the place...
a c 127 G Storage
February 12, 2010 6:06:15 AM

HDDs die, live with that. Any brand can fail; so what does it matter anyway. Make sure you invest in a backup and focus on the warranty to replace the hardware.

If you don't want any drive failures; buy an SSD.
a b G Storage
February 12, 2010 6:09:30 AM

vaughn2k said:
Yeah, looks normal though... wait between 3 to 9 months, and it will die suddenly...

Seagate with 7200.12 - Relocated sector count error and spin try count error is now all over the place...

The .12s are quite reliable. No drive is perfect, but the .12s are not a problem. Now, the .11s, those were a different story.
a b G Storage
February 12, 2010 6:11:18 AM

sub mesa said:
HDDs die, live with that. Any brand can fail; so what does it matter anyway. Make sure you invest in a backup and focus on the warranty to replace the hardware.

If you don't want any drive failures; buy an SSD.

Even that isn't failsafe. SSDs do fail, they just have different failure modes. The real point is that if you care about your data, make sure you back it up. At the very least, have it on two independent (preferably different) drives, but better still if you have it on an offline drive that you only connect for backups, and best is an offsite copy (so that anything like a house fire can't destroy the data).
a c 127 G Storage
February 12, 2010 6:37:39 AM

SSDs do fail, but that date is predictable; once the number of write cycles go beyond the rated number of cycles. When it runs out of write cycles, it will switch to read-only mode. That still means you do not lose your data.

Of course, electronical circuits can fail too, and are susceptible to static/moisture/voltage variations/extreme temperature etc. But it shouldn't be 'normal' that an SSD simply fails from one moment to the other, like HDDs do (unpredictable failures). So while SSDs fail, their failures are much more predictable. With a simple app showing the average number of write cycles, you can say "this SSD is on 22% of its lifetime". So its lifespan becomes measurable and predictable.
a b G Storage
February 12, 2010 5:54:47 PM

Not necessarily. The lifetimes are statistical, not absolute. I have also seen some data implying that SSDs can suddenly fail in some circumstances. It isn't likely, but it is still worth backing up your data if you absolutely need reliability.
February 12, 2010 8:55:17 PM

Its kind of silly to discuss HDD vs SSD in terms of absolute reliability. If you need absolute reliability then multiple offsite backups are far more of an issue than onsite hardware.
February 12, 2010 9:09:23 PM

i have the same yellow warning in HD tune program for my Seagate 7200.12 1 TB (model:ST31000528AS) like you and i have this drive now for 3 weeks and it is fine.
also i have old Seagate 120GB (model:ST3120022A) who has the same warning when drive enter the power(green) mode so you may disable the power saving of HD in windows and see if you still receive this error
also i test it (Seagate 7200.12 1 TB) with latest SeaTools for Windows and it is pass the test so don't worry
also i would like to point that this 1Tb Seagate (ST31000528AS) drive is really fast

here is my HDTune result for Seagate 7200.12 1 TB (model:ST31000528AS) Drive:



here is my HDTune result for my old Seagate 120GB (model:ST3120022A) Drive:


a c 127 G Storage
February 13, 2010 12:01:35 AM

dndhatcher said:
Its kind of silly to discuss HDD vs SSD in terms of absolute reliability. If you need absolute reliability then multiple offsite backups are far more of an issue than onsite hardware.

Point taken, but if harddrives were as reliable as, say, processors and RAM; then i think home users won't use things like RAID1/mirroring all that often.

Of course, a CPU and Memory chip can fail too - but more likely either in factory or when handling them. A sudden dropout is rare. For a HDD, its not rare at all. It's actually so common. I would guess 80% of the hardware that failed for me, were HDDs. The root cause can be found in the case that they are high-velocity moving parts which may wear/tear and is much more fragile and vulnerable to any mechanical failure; even though the electronical circuit is just fine.

So i guess my point was, that SSDs are now potentially as 'safe' as the rest of your electronical system and SSD failures are much less common. That still doesn't mean you shouldn't keep backups - if only because of potential virusses, filesystem damage or other dataloss not related to a disk failure. But as SSDs are often used as system drive, its a less likely target for personal files. Not many files on the SSD would need to be backupped. And it can take awhile before SSDs are cheap enough to use them for mass-data storage (i.e. having 1TB SSDs for a reasonable price and pairing 4 or 6 of them in a ZFS array). Right now, my mass data storage is handled by HDDs still, though i use SSDs to act as cache device in the ZFS array, meaning it will be used to store the most accessed parts so latency to these parts is very low (0.1ms). But that won't affect reliability, sadly.

a b G Storage
February 13, 2010 1:52:08 AM

If it makes you feel any less worried I have a 1TB, 7200.12 and here are my results that I ran about a week ago or so, this is all I've got...





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