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My pc8500 misreads as pc6400

Last response: in Memory
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January 5, 2009 9:38:52 PM

So here is what I am workin with.

Gigabyte GA-EP45-UD3P

OCZ Reaper OCZ2RPR10664GK 4gb (2x2gb) PC8500

HIS HD4870 1GB

Rosewill 750w psu

Intel e8500 core2 duo

Cooler Master V8 HS/F


So I have oc'ed my cpu at 4.05ghz. I now want to start on my memory but first I have a question about what my max bandwidth readings are with cpuid.

It is showing that the max bandwidth is pc6400 (400mhz) even though my ram is pc8500. I thought i might be getting a bad reading so i checked with pc wizard and it said the same thing. I then checked my bios and that says I am at 1066. However, cpuid's website has a frequently asked question topic regarding this. And this is what it says.

Q4: Why does CPU-Z misreport my memory module specification ? For example, my DDR2-800 is reported as DDR2-667.
A: The memory theorical bandwidth is computed using the module access time information for the maximal CAS# latency value, included in the SPD area. If the computed bandwidth is lower than the one specified on the memory module, that means that the SPD information on the module is not correctly programmed, or most likely that the bandwidth is not given at the default memory voltage, but at a voltage defined in an extended profile (EPP or XMP).

So my question is... Can anyone help me make sense of what there saying here? Am I able to program the module my self or is it faulty memory. I have done memtest on it and it seems to be fine. my voltages seem to be fine as well. This maybe a silly question. but a am a newbie, so thanks in advance.

More about : pc8500 misreads pc6400

January 5, 2009 11:47:05 PM

Q4: Why does CPU-Z misreport my memory module specification ? For example, my DDR2-800 is reported as DDR2-667.
A: The memory theorical bandwidth is computed using the module access time information for the maximal CAS# latency value, included in the SPD area. If the computed bandwidth is lower than the one specified on the memory module, that means that the SPD information on the module is not correctly programmed, or most likely that the bandwidth is not given at the default memory voltage, but at a voltage defined in an extended profile (EPP or XMP).

I believe this means that at the default voltage (usually 1.8v), your RAM may run at different speeds, or that it is not represented correctly because it would need you to tweak the voltage.
a c 80 } Memory
January 5, 2009 11:50:44 PM

Since 1066 isn't an approved JDEC standard, an SPD table for that speed most likely doesn't exist (you can check the SPD tables with CPU-Z). You'll have to set them manually. EPP doesn't apply to Intel chipsets.
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