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Did I fail at mounting this heatsink?

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December 12, 2009 8:42:26 PM

Ok so I was installing my Titan Fenrir and besides the complicatedness of the instructional manual written in Thailand with words like "side" spelled wrong I managed to get it on. I then notice its going to pull air from the back of the GPU....This is how its pictured on the instructions and and didnt seem to fit with the fan facing the top due to the huge heatsinks on the Asus Sabertooth, they are raised about an inch and a half to 2 inches off the mother board. That is on both the top and the side nearest the back. On the other side is did not seem to fit due to the Ripjaws heatsinks so although im not positive I think this is the only way it would fit. Does this not look odd to anyone else? As you can see, I fail lack of much knowledge in the Heatsink/Overclocking field.

Heres the pic, a bit blurry sorry, hard to see the fan becuase it is silver greyish:
http://img269.imageshack.us/img269/6272/dsc00299ca.jpg

More about : fail mounting heatsink

a b K Overclocking
December 12, 2009 10:15:46 PM

Looking at your photo I would say your heatrsink is off 90 degrees.

As you look inside your case, the typical 160mm tower style heatsink fan is installed on the right side of the heatsink. It blows air through the heatsink toward the exhaust fan on the rear panel.

Now, having said that, it is possible that a heatsink may have to be installed with the fan on the bottom so that it is blowing air toward an exhaust fan in the top panel of the case. Although unusual, it does happen sometime. The problem is usually the orientation of the mounting bracket that comes with the heatsink.

The ripjaw memory models have those extra tall heatspreaders that sort of look like a comb. The tall heatspreaders will definitely interfere with a cpu heatsink. There have been technical reviews clearly indicating they are a waste of time. They are not any better than standard heatspreaders. We had several other posts this past week about those ripjaws.

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a b K Overclocking
December 12, 2009 10:29:00 PM

I got curious why some of the posters got excited about the cpu heatsink in that other thread. I just finished reading six different technical reviews. I stumbled across a very good photo showing a heatsink installed in an Intel Core i7, socket 1366 system.

You can take a look and see how it was supposed to be installed with the heatsink fan blowing toward the exhaust fan on the rear panel of the case:

http://www.bjorn3d.com/read.php?cID=1552&pageID=6767

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December 12, 2009 10:34:25 PM

I do not full understand your post, you said the heatsink is possible to have to be installed with the fan on the bottom so that it is blowing air toward an exhaust fan in the top panel of the case, so you are saying to flip one of the fans of the top to intake so it flows air out of the case? My temps now are max of 37C on all cores with just folding/some chrome tabs open and max of 60C after about 10 mins of Short FFTs prime 95 torture, folding, and some other apps. With that said should I A pull the heatsink off and try to see if it will fit without interfearing with the Ram, I am not positive that it will not fit that way but I did only try once, or B should I flip the top intake fan over on the top panel or leave it as it? Please note that I am planning on overclock, but nothing past about 3.6GHz.
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December 12, 2009 10:39:20 PM

Also, I want to say the the case temps are max of 27C after being on about 30 mins with max rpms. That is being measured with sensors directly in the airflow going through the fan on the Touch2000 controller. The rear exhaust fan is 27C and the top intake directly about the heatsink is also 27C as it is getting the hot air from the heatsink. The top intake fan directly next to that one is 25C and the front intake only being 22C. That is a noticeable difference where it is. With the stock heaksink in there I can't remember it ever getting past 29C on lowest rpms.
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a b K Overclocking
December 12, 2009 10:54:01 PM

Normally the fans mounted on the top panel of a pc case are exhaust fans. They blow hot air out of the case. Your member configuration shows you have a Dragon Lord case. Those fans on the top panel are supposed to be exhaust fans. Did you flip them?

I am wondering if you have the heatsink bracket installed correctly. That web page with the photo clearly shows the heatsink and the fan blowing toward the back of the case. Did the heatsink come with more than one bracket for different sockets?
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December 12, 2009 11:06:58 PM

You are correct. I took the top off and checked, they way the top was vented made me think they were intakes. I installed the bracket correctly to the best of my knowledge, as I mentioned earlier the installation sheet was near useless.
Here is the bracket I used. The Bolt-through bracket is not used with that one, just the screws from the back. This bracket here mounts on top of the heatpipe spreader. I used the line screw holes, closes to the four corners.
http://www.frozencpu.com/products/10065/cpu-ttn-05/Tita...

This is the same bracket on the far right
http://www.frozencpu.com/products/image/10058/cpu-ttn-0...
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December 12, 2009 11:17:59 PM

get different heatsinks for the motherboard instead of the tall ones, but amek sure they hold inplace somehow!
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December 12, 2009 11:22:53 PM

shovenose said:
get different heatsinks for the motherboard instead of the tall ones, but amek sure they hold inplace somehow!



I kind of already have this $65 HSF out of the box...thanks for your advise....
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a b K Overclocking
December 12, 2009 11:45:22 PM

sonic-boom said:
Ok so I was installing my Titan Fenrir and besides the complicatedness of the instructional manual written in Thailand with words like "side" spelled wrong I managed to get it on. I then notice its going to pull air from the back of the GPU....This is how its pictured on the instructions and and didnt seem to fit with the fan facing the top due to the huge heatsinks on the Asus Sabertooth, they are raised about an inch and a half to 2 inches off the mother board. That is on both the top and the side nearest the back. On the other side is did not seem to fit due to the Ripjaws heatsinks so although im not positive I think this is the only way it would fit. Does this not look odd to anyone else? As you can see, I fail lack of much knowledge in the Heatsink/Overclocking field.

Heres the pic, a bit blurry sorry, hard to see the fan becuase it is silver greyish:
http://img269.imageshack.us/img269/6272/dsc00299ca.jpg


Fan mounts on front of the cooler blowning back, not on the bottom blowing up.
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December 12, 2009 11:49:45 PM

The fan can't mount on the other side of the cooler, it is on the side where the fan brackets lock on to the heatsink. I think? This is how the instruction sheet said to mount it onto the heatsink.
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a b K Overclocking
December 13, 2009 12:30:03 AM

OK! You mounted the heatsink fan in the correct location on the heatsink. No problem with that. It's cool!

I noticed you have the ASUS Sabertooth 55i motherboard which is an LGA 1156 motherboard. The heatsink bracket you linked to is advertised as an LGA 1156 bracket. No problem with that either. So far so good.

The problem is it looks like you need to rotate the heatsink 90 degrees to get it in the correct position. I noticed in the photos that the bracket has numerous holes in it for a variety of configurations. Is there a possibility you can rotate the bracket and the heatsink 90 degrees and still match up the holes? It just might be something as simple as that.

BTW - If that works, don't forget to remove the thermal compound from your cpu and heatsink. Clean them and then apply new thermal compound.

BTW #2 - I am thinking of getting the Intel Core i7 860 and the Asus Sabertooth 55i motherboard which is listed in your configuration. How do you like that combination? Any problems with it?
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December 13, 2009 12:35:31 AM

See, the bracket is not the problem, I CAN turn that 90 and it be fine, the problem is with the heatsink/fan not having enough room because of the mobo heatsinks and ram heatsinks. That is originally why I mounted it this way. I didn't screw around with it for 20 mins trying to get it to fit ther otherway, just long enough to be apparent that i didn't THINK it would fit. I can try to mount it that way but as mentioned the mobo heatsinks are very high and turned the way it is there is probably less than 1inch between the heatsink and the heatspreaders on mobo, therefore as it is longer than wider i think that it may be a problem turned that way, I also think its a problem on the ram side aswell.



I love the 860- Sabertooth config, epically with its Marine inspired design and couldn't be happier, until today.
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December 13, 2009 12:37:23 AM

Erm, hit submit on accident

Until today because of this mobo heatsink/ram heatsink problem. The Sabertooth seems to be only board with these odd, but possibly highly effective heatsinks on the board, more testing of them with aftermarket cpu heatsinks could have been nice. And such has been my only problem with it.
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a b K Overclocking
December 13, 2009 12:50:30 AM

I am looking a photo of the motherboard over at newegg.com. I blew it up so I can take a closer look. I'm also looking at that photo of the heatsink and fan installed in the LGA 1366 motherboard at the technical review I linked to in my previous post. It will be a tight fit but it should work. Since you've got those ripjaws you might have to remove the ripjaw from the two memory banks closest to the cpu. As near as I can tell the ripjaw should be the only problem.
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December 13, 2009 12:56:05 AM

This mobo uses,what would be if you counted them left to right, slots #2 and #4 as the first set of ram, therefore the are as far away as they can be already. Even still, should I pull it off and try to reset?
BTW really appreciate your help!
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a b K Overclocking
December 13, 2009 12:59:07 AM

If memory bank #1 which is closest to the cpu is already empty, then give it a try.
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a c 163 K Overclocking
December 13, 2009 1:06:55 AM

Heat rises.....so it's logical toi install HS fans to blow UP and out the top of the case .... unfortunately logic and reality sometimes don't jive. I had asked Prolimatech TS that very question just to "confirm" my logic. The morning after I installed their HS "logically", they responded that it should blow air out the back of the case; we have tested it extensively in many cases, including the Antec 1200 which you are using and we get better test results with air blowing to rear"

Go figure.....and no I didn't take it out and change it. However, while not set for optimal performance the Prolimatech does fit either way....your situation appears markedly different.
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a b K Overclocking
December 13, 2009 1:24:05 AM

Jack - You forgot something. Heat rises when the air is still. If there is sufficient pressure in a horizontal forced air system, then heat does not rise. Instead, it follows the air flow. Line up a series of 120mm, 1,200 rpm, 45cfm case fans inside a pc case and you can get something like a wind tunnel effect. You can definitely move warm air horizontally.

Jet fighters and the turbines inside their engines would be an extreme example. Cool air sucked in the front and really hot air exhausted out the back.
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December 13, 2009 1:36:54 AM

OK, I took it off and after playing with it for 10 mins i got it to fit. I had to pull the first ram dimm out set the heatsink and put it back in. I'm sure i bent a few fins in the process but oh well. Temps seem to be lower so far...
Thank for all your help JohnnyLucky.
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a c 163 K Overclocking
December 14, 2009 2:14:39 AM

JohnnyLucky said:
Jack - You forgot something. Heat rises when the air is still. If there is sufficient pressure in a horizontal forced air system, then heat does not rise. Instead, it follows the air flow. Line up a series of 120mm, 1,200 rpm, 45cfm case fans inside a pc case and you can get something like a wind tunnel effect. You can definitely move warm air horizontally.

Jet fighters and the turbines inside their engines would be an extreme example. Cool air sucked in the front and really hot air exhausted out the back.


But we ain't talkin air moving at 900 mph. We ain't quite got wind tunnel pressures here.

Think about 45 cfm.and your 2.5 CF HAF 932 case ....that's one turnover in air every 3.33 seconds ...with 2 in and two out /... under 2 seconds....and that's w/ fans on high....if your case fans are on 50% speed for quietness.....much lower.

No doubt you can and will move air horizontally but you will also have rising air currents .....which is why the most prevalent case design lets air in at bottom front and out the top rear....this way you sue BOTh the air flow and convection to your best advantage

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Computer_case_cooling...

Take one of those laser thermometers to your HAF, I'd vbe willing to bet you have a measurable surface gradient on the side panels from bottom to tip.

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a b K Overclocking
December 14, 2009 3:04:55 AM

The reason blowing the fan horizontally works better than blowing it upward is that the above the graphics card is much hotter than the air at the front of the motherboard. Easy answer.

Of course there's always the matter of heatpipe orientation too, but without getting too far off track most systems with tower coolers work better when the fan blows from front to rear.
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December 15, 2009 8:44:07 PM

Here's a thread I've learned from. I've always mounted my hsf on the rear side of the hs sucking air off the heatsink.

Can anyone help me understand why there is any difference? In both cases, it would seem to me that the same air flow is being directed over the same hs. Perhaps the difference is that mounting on the front of the hs means the "source air" is more likely cooler, as doing it my way I may get air already heated as the flow through.

Perhaps I answered my own question.

I'll flip my fan, wouldn't it be great to see better cooling!

Bob
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a b K Overclocking
December 15, 2009 9:18:28 PM

bob5568 said:
Here's a thread I've learned from. I've always mounted my hsf on the rear side of the hs sucking air off the heatsink.

Can anyone help me understand why there is any difference? In both cases, it would seem to me that the same air flow is being directed over the same hs. Perhaps the difference is that mounting on the front of the hs means the "source air" is more likely cooler, as doing it my way I may get air already heated as the flow through.

Perhaps I answered my own question.

I'll flip my fan, wouldn't it be great to see better cooling!

Bob


Fans blow most of their air forward, but draw most of their air from the sides. In order to make a "suck" fan work properly the sink would need to be shrouded with the sides sealed. That's why cars need fan shrouds, and why so many customized cars with open fans overheat at idle.
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a c 163 K Overclocking
December 16, 2009 1:47:53 AM

Crashman said:
The reason blowing the fan horizontally works better than blowing it upward is that the above the graphics card is much hotter than the air at the front of the motherboard. Easy answer.

Of course there's always the matter of heatpipe orientation too, but without getting too far off track most systems with tower coolers work better when the fan blows from front to rear.


In the 1200, I have a bit of a wind tunnel blowing across the vid card......two fans in series at the front and two parallel in rear. But point to be considered is when running Prime95, GFX card ain't doing much. I'm not showing any difference w/ the infrared thermo....gonna try connecting some of the R2E's temp sensors and see what I can measure.
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a b K Overclocking
December 16, 2009 3:29:04 PM

Good read - Current HSF orientation is up (240 mm top fan, 120 back, 2 in front).
will change to blow toward rear and see what the diff is.
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a b K Overclocking
January 29, 2010 7:18:19 PM

I currently went from a horizontal to a vertical configuration with my Scythe Mugen 2, but I'm using an Antec 902, so there's a 200mm fan on top(600rpm/108CFM) and a 120mm (1600rpm/56CFM) rear to exhaust. I'm running 4.0ghz @ 1.525V, and my idle temps are 39-40C. From my previous horizontal config, idle temps were approx. the same, so I think it just depends on how good the airflow in your case is.
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