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AMD Phenom X4 9950 (help overclocking)

Last response: in Overclocking
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December 17, 2009 8:42:41 AM

i have never really tryed to over clock and i think i want to try with this CPU i like it here's the spec.


2.6GHz true guadcore

4.0 mb total L2=L3 Cache

Socket AM2+


i would like to maby push it to 3.0ghz.
but i really dont know the Risks or the way to do it.
And if you could give me some insight i would be happy

thanks
December 17, 2009 1:35:29 PM

I'm assuming you know how to get to your BIOS. Somewhere in the BIOS you should see something about a CPU multiplier. I don't really remember what number it'll be at on stock settings, but the best way to do it is to raise the multiplier one number at a time, then leave your BIOS and screw around and see if its stable. I know the 9950 can OC to 3.0 just fine, so I don't see much of a problem of raising the multiplier to get it at 3.0 ghz.

Ryan actually posted a good OC configuration on my thread. http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/255687-29-phenom-9950...


Good luck. You may or may not want to look into a third party cooler if you're going to OC your CPU, but I don't know how hot the 9950 gets on the stock fan.
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December 17, 2009 1:43:55 PM

I believe the cpu you are talking about is a black edition processor, which makes overclocking simple.

This processor should allow you to change the multiplier of the cpu. At 2.6 Ghz, it takes the system bus speed (200 Mhz) and multiplies the bus X13 to get a processor speed of 2600Mhz, or 2.6 Ghz.

If you change the multi to 14x, that would give you 2.8 Ghz. A 15x multi would get you 3.0 Ghz, which is a nice little bump. I was able to clock my X4 9850 to 3.1 Ghz fairly easily, but settled for a 3.0 Ghz day to day OC to save wear and tear on my CPU.

I recommend downloading the latest version of AMD overdrive and play with the multiplier settings. Use the AOD benchmark between tweeks to get a quick glance at how the performance is improving. Use the stress test to monitor temperatures under load.

By far the most important thing to watch for when overclocking is temperature. Before undertaking any overclocking, you should ensure you have advanced cooling for your cpu. Look at aftermarket coolers such as the Thermalright Ultra 120, Xigmatek 1283, and the Zalman 9500-9700. Frostytech.com has reviews on the best cpu coolers available for your processor.
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December 18, 2009 1:48:14 AM

Cool thanks alot guys.......is there anything else that needs to be done i saw someone say something about memory timeings whats that and do i need to worry about it......also if i OC my CPU i will for shure need a new cpu cooler? and what should i spend on that and what temps. should i be looking for?

thanks

PS. how long will me CPU live for if i OC it to 3.0?
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December 18, 2009 1:54:05 AM

Elementgreen said:
I'm assuming you know how to get to your BIOS. Somewhere in the BIOS you should see something about a CPU multiplier. I don't really remember what number it'll be at on stock settings, but the best way to do it is to raise the multiplier one number at a time, then leave your BIOS and screw around and see if its stable. I know the 9950 can OC to 3.0 just fine, so I don't see much of a problem of raising the multiplier to get it at 3.0 ghz.

Ryan actually posted a good OC configuration on my thread. http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/255687-29-phenom-9950...


Good luck. You may or may not want to look into a third party cooler if you're going to OC your CPU, but I don't know how hot the 9950 gets on the stock fan.



Ryan seemd like he really know what hes doing i am going to try to fallow what he says and see were it takes me........thanks
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December 18, 2009 6:06:24 AM

You only need to worry about memory timings if your CPU is not a black edition. If it is not, then you need to change the CPU frequency, at least that is what it is called in my BIOS. Changing that number, unlike simply changing the CPU multiplier, affects the entire system: RAM and Mobo. Thus, if you do not have a black edition, overclocking requires you to fiddle with your memory timings and North Bridge Speed.

I have a Phenom X4 9750, which is not a black edition processor. As a result, when I overclocked it I had to lower the northbridge and up my RAM speed from 800Mhz to 1066Mhz to keep the system stable. I managed to get it from 2.4Ghz stock to 3.0Ghz perfectly stable. Keep in mind I have an after market cooler, the Sunbeam CCF (which I highly recommend by the way!), which kept my temps below 70 at full load.

Also keep in mind that as you increase the Multiplier, at some point, should you decide to push your overclock further, you will have to increase the voltage going to your CPU. My stock voltage was set at 1.2V and I had to raise it to 1.4V to get a stable overclock. You will find that most people do not like to push voltage above 1.5V and for good reason, at some point you WILL fry your CPU, but, so far as I am aware, as long as your temps remain below 70C at full load, you are fine. Just the same, try not to go over 1.5V, just to be safe. You can change your voltage in the BIOS. On my Mobo, the controls are on the same tab as the CPU multiplier and most of the important stuff, you may have to do some searching on yours.

As far as life span, so far as I am aware, unless you OC your CPU to the max, like from 2.6 Ghz to over 4 or something crazy like that (I have a friend that did just that with an Intel chip) the lifespan of your chip will not be affected in any way, provided you don't set the voltage too high :) 

Don't be afraid to fiddle with it. Two months ago I didn't know the first thing about overclocking, but after hours of reading, questioning, and screwing up, I finally managed to get a stable 600Mhz OC, which is pretty good considering the low OC headroom of the 9750.

Good luck!
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December 18, 2009 6:51:26 AM

Wow thanks allot u really are a big help so i should push me multiplyer to 15x but take in little steps and i dont have to worry about anny thing else SHWEET. and one more thing how can i chek to see if my set up is stable is there a program that will show me?

70c thats seems really hot im running at idol like 46 and under load (big) 57 is that right or is my HWmonitor wrong?

thanks
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December 18, 2009 5:12:00 PM

Yes, as I mentioned AMD overdrive has temp monitoring, a stress test, and a benchmark. Its fairly comprehensive.

And those temps are high, but not surprising with a retail heatsink. Further overclocking efforts will be enhanced with a new heatsink, not to mention protecting the investment of your CPU.
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December 18, 2009 5:14:45 PM

True test of stability? Doesn't crash while playing games. However aside from the stress test in AOD, Prime 95 torture test is how most enthusiasts test their system stability.

Bemchmarks like 3dmark06/vantage can show signs of instability as well.
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December 25, 2009 4:31:07 AM

thanks......so it seems that i just need a new CPU cooler befor i really go anywere with the OCing. and im gunna get a new case to so that should help as well im think the thermaltake V9 black edtion

thanks guys
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