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External Raid 0 fail, recovery CRITICAL, please help!

Hey guys. Im assuming stuff like this has been posted before here but this is critically important and I cant wait long looking for answers. Google has run dry and Im all out of options. A friend of mine had some very important information backed up to one of these
http://www.g-technology.com/Products/g-raid.cfm
The external stopped working eventually, and now we obviously cannot access the information easily from any way we can find. We tried an external disk reader and it detected both drives but of course could not access or interact with either (due to raid 0 configuration). Now Im not sure if the raid array on the chipset in the external failed, or if one of the hard drives failed. Our options are now limited to sending the disks in for professional recovery or anything you guys suggest... We considered buying a second identical external and swapping the drives, I dont know if that would be successfull. Unfortunately while I can figure out most other computer problems I know little of raid systems (obviously) and dont want to risk losing more info accidentally (if any is left on the disks). If any of you have any idea PLEASE help!! This is really important!!!!
17 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about external raid fail recovery critical help
  1. hahahahahahahahah


    sorry

    you're screwed....
  2. Try RaidReconstructor (from Runtime.org); if that fails see above.
  3. So thats my only option? Putting it in another identical housing wont likely read? I assume that if I use raidreconstructor Ill have to put them in a raid array in my desktop...or how does that particular program do its work? Thanks!
  4. So all you want is to recover data from a RAID0; and the disks themselves are fine?

    So, what's the problem? Just apply any RAID-engine on the disks and start recovering. Any open source OS should be able to do this, most notably Ubuntu and FreeBSD.
  5. MrLinux said:
    Try RaidReconstructor (from Runtime.org)
    RAIDReconstructor is the shiznit! I've used it a few times for botched RAID5 and RIAD0 arrays. It's free to evaluate to see if it will recover your data, but you must pay for a license to enable full functionality. IMO, it's totally worth paying for!

    Digital Dissent said:
    So thats my only option? Putting it in another identical housing wont likely read? I assume that if I use raidreconstructor Ill have to put them in a raid array in my desktop...or how does that particular program do its work? Thanks!
    Read the docs for RAIDReconstructor, it's an easy application to use, just be sure to have an extra drive to copy your data to.

    Anonymous said:
    So all you want is to recover data from a RAID0; and the disks themselves are fine?

    So, what's the problem? Just apply any RAID-engine on the disks and start recovering. Any open source OS should be able to do this, most notably Ubuntu and FreeBSD.
    Sub mesa is right, if not RAIDReconstructor, this is another way to recover your data.
  6. And its 100% free. :)

    And if properly done without any risk since its a read-only operation.
  7. Hi newcomer and welcome to the Tom's hardware forum

    A RAID 0 array can't be recovered, rebuild or any other similar thing.
  8. Why not saint19? If, assuming, all data is still on the disks it is of course recoverable. You just temporarily lost access to it; that access can be restored by two things:

    - recreate the RAID using the same RAID engine using the same settings (dangerous)
    - use another RAID engine (Linux/BSD) to perform read-only virtual RAID recovery.

    Both options are real, and if the data on the physical disks is still fine, there is no reason a RAID cannot be recovered; whether its RAID0/1/3/4/5/6; you can recover all, including (complex) nested RAID arrays.

    Essentially all you need is a driver that reads from the correct locations from the multiple HDDs; if it uses the correct settings a RAID array is accessible from any RAID engine (windows/linux/BSD - all can access the contents on the RAID).
  9. Great to hear it. I know my computer can pull that off, being a desktop running ubuntu 9.10 (64bit). Thing is that this data is important enough to justify sending it in to proffessional recovery and paying the premium, so the trick here is the danger level. The problem is Im rather new to ubuntu and just barely understand the command line. I dont want to risk loss of data so where is a good place to learn how to use this program and apply it (must work safely). Alternatively Im understanding that using another identical external and swapping the drives wont work? Is the risk of this, being rather new, significant enough to justify sending it in for pro recovery or can I likely pull it off safely? Thanks guys youve been a great help!
  10. If the drive has physical damage is not possible recover the data. Now, assuming that the HDD is good he needs a Linux distribution with enough space in the HDD to recover all the data of the array.
  11. Recovering to another networked PC is most easy in my opinion. When the OP has verified he has access to his data, he can mount any CIFS filesystem from the network; so any Windows PC with file sharing enabled and configured would do.
  12. Well, is a very good option to recover the array without lost the data....but i still prefer the RAID 5 and mirror.
  13. So if I do this under ubuntu, I should be able to recover the data (given I succeed in accessing it) and sending it to an external hard drive? It would take forever yes I know. Im thinking e-sata?
  14. First verify that using Ubuntu you can access your files on the RAID
    Then determine where you want to backup/copy your data. This can be the HDD on another computer on the network, which i find the easiest, or you can drop in another internal/external drive big enough to store the data you want to retrieve.
  15. Best answer
    Lesson here, never, ever for any reason store critical data on a RAID 0 array. In the storage world, it is the worst of bad ideas.
  16. Best answer selected by r_manic.
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