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7200 vs 10000 rpm in laptop

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February 24, 2010 9:50:36 AM

Hello

I just purchased a Dell laptop, and the only option was a 5400 RPM harddrive. This seems quite low to me, so I was wondering whether the upgrade to a 7200 or even 10,000 was worth it.

I am juggling between these two drives:
Seagate Momentus 7200.4 - 500 Go SATA
Western Digital VelociRaptor 300 Go SATA (10 000 rpm)

My questions are:
1. Will the performance of my otherwise high-end laptop increase noticibly if I upgrade from my 5400rpm drive
2. How will the 7200 and the 10000rpm affect battery life
3. Is there a significant difference between the 7200 and 10000, or isnt the difference worth the upgrade to 10000?
4. Is there an increased risk of loss of data with a super fast drive (such as the 10000rpm)?


Thanks

Zach

More about : 7200 10000 rpm laptop

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a c 127 G Storage
February 24, 2010 10:03:34 AM

The Velociraptor needs a 3,5" mount for cooling. Using it without its caddy in a normal laptop would make it fail fairly quickly due to overheating. So this isnt an option.

An 7200rpm only has marginal performance increases. The only real upgrade performance-wise is an SSD and SSDs don't consume any real power too so you won't have to worry about temperatures.

1) Only if you replace with an SSD
2) Same with 7200rpm; decrease for 10.000rpm as it uses 4 times as much power
3) yes there is; in both power and latency.
4) i'd say the risk is close to 100% dying within the first year.


Cheers,
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a c 415 G Storage
February 24, 2010 4:50:29 PM

Don't I remember from something I read a few months back that the Velociraptor isn't a true laptop drive because it's too thick?

This post seems to confirm that.
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February 24, 2010 5:36:45 PM

A Velociraptor is too thick to work in most laptops.

When I went from a 5400RPM to a 7200RPM, I did notice a difference. I'd only upgrade RPM's if you're upgrading size as well. 7200RPM drives are similar in price to 5400RPM drives. The 10,000RPM drives are a large price increase for a small performance increase.

I just went from a Velociraptor to an OCZ Agility SSD and it is such a difference. Don't waste your time with Velociraptor's. Get 5400/7200RPM for size or SSD for speed.
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a b G Storage
February 24, 2010 9:22:05 PM

A velociraptor will not work. Not only is it too thick, it also has different power requirements. Notebook drives only use 5V and 3.3V supply, while desktop drives use 12V and 5V. The SATA connector is identical for both, but in notebooks, the 12V pin is not connected. Because of this, a Velociraptor would not even spin up (even if you got it to fit), as it is designed for desktop and server use, and requires 12V.

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February 25, 2010 7:12:36 AM

Thanks for the replies.

I see that SSD specs are noted in read/write in MB/s. Can anyone tell me the average (or guess at the average) read/write in MB/s for 5400rpm and 7200rpm drives?

I am highly considering getting an SSD, but the price difference between the 100mb/s read/writes and the 200MB/s read/writes is HUGE. Before I buy, I'd like to know how these compare to harddrives (objectively).
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a c 127 G Storage
February 25, 2010 7:38:21 AM

Check these benches, and you'll see where SSD's really shine; in random I/O:

http://www.anandtech.com/cpuchipsets/showdoc.aspx?i=360...

For sequential I/O, harddrives are reasonably fast too, SSDs maybe doubling its performance over HDDs. But in random I/O, it can be a factor of 100 improvement over a HDD; that's why booting and launching apps is so much faster on SSDs. That you can never achieve with a HDD.
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February 25, 2010 1:44:32 PM

Thank you very much for the article, I spent most of the morning reading through it.

Now that I know more about SSD I am a lot more hesitant to purchase one. It seems as if it is not a long-term solution (very limited total read and writes), not efficent over time (as soon as all the pages are full you get a significant reduction in speed), and has a few 'bugs' (can read/write pages but only delete blocks).

The impression that I get is that this is an overpriced hd alternative, with many things that need to be sorted out before it can be seriously considered for a work laptop.

Also, I see a lot of people using this as a boot drive. That's fine, but I don't think that my studio xps 16 can support dual harddrives anyway.

Finally, it seems that unless you are willing to pay a premium ($10+ per GB), you will end up with problems such as stuttering, which you have to work around (by disabling OS components, changing program configs so they dont write small files often to the disk, etc.)

Thanks, but no thanks!
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a c 127 G Storage
February 25, 2010 3:29:29 PM

The Intel drives are at $3 per GB as far as i know. That's alot, but for your system drive you don't need that much GB. A small 80GB system drive is fine for OS + applications. Those will run very fast and benefit the most from the massive speed improvements the SSD brings.

For mass-storage, SSDs are unattractive. They may be more reliable and resilient against physical damage/temperature variations, but as mass-storage data is often accessed sequentially, the speed benefits here are pretty small.

About the endurance of SSDs; a good SSD like the Intel will last longer than a HDD. Better yet, you can predict when it will fail, and when it does you can still read your data from it so you don't have to lose data again. Of course, all piece of equipment can fail, but HDDs fail alot more than other electronical components because they are very susceptible to wear and damage by external influence, due to them having mechanical components. Still the reliability of a good SSD is vastly superior to any HDD.
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February 25, 2010 3:31:09 PM

I paid $2/GB and it really is noticeably faster than my 10000RPM drive. As long as you do your research, you shouldn't end up with any stuttering or problems. It is expensive, but you get incredible speed. Plus Windows 7 automatically configures the system to your drive.

For you, a 7200RPM hard drive would probably be fine. I have a Seagate Momentus 7200.4 320GB, and it is more than enough for the average user.

7200RPM - cheap, lots of space
SSD - Fast, cool, longer battery life, reliability
What do you want out of your new hard drive? They both have their Pros and Cons.
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a b G Storage
March 12, 2010 3:10:57 AM

Best answer selected by r_manic.
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March 13, 2010 9:31:56 PM

I suggest to buy a SSD. It's a lot more expensive but if you have a laptop, there are other reasons besides more speed. How about no moving parts and making things lighter? Keep the stock HDD as a backup or sell it. Get a SSD and basically, from what I've read and seen on YouTube, a SSD can be 2x as fast as the HDD. Also, there is TRIM and what is called 'Garbage Collection' which 'cleans' up the drive and improves the performance. I read that it can 'fix it' to factory or original level so as good as it was when you got it. That's pretty good. The main negative after you spend the money is the capacity is low. So, if you can find the money, get a SSD and a 1TB HDD for your storage (data and any extra programs, say...).

Right now, the best SSD is probably the Intels but some new ones with different controllers are to come out soon.
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November 6, 2011 7:55:57 PM

Canuck1 said:
I suggest to buy a SSD. It's a lot more expensive but if you have a laptop, there are other reasons besides more speed. How about no moving parts and making things lighter? Keep the stock HDD as a backup or sell it. Get a SSD and basically, from what I've read and seen on YouTube, a SSD can be 2x as fast as the HDD. Also, there is TRIM and what is called 'Garbage Collection' which 'cleans' up the drive and improves the performance. I read that it can 'fix it' to factory or original level so as good as it was when you got it. That's pretty good. The main negative after you spend the money is the capacity is low. So, if you can find the money, get a SSD and a 1TB HDD for your storage (data and any extra programs, say...).

Right now, the best SSD is probably the Intels but some new ones with different controllers are to come out soon.


Intel has some seriously negative reviews over combatibility and fails. Crucial seems to have a very good rating overall for stablility and live as long as advertised.
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a c 244 D Laptop
a b G Storage
November 7, 2011 5:31:24 AM

This topic has been closed by Maziar
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