Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Building Raid10 system for server

Last response: in Storage
Share
February 25, 2010 6:57:30 PM

I would like to build a RAID10 server wiht 1TB capacity for hosting local web server & database server.

I am going to do it first time, need some guide about what hardware to buy, and step by step guide to set this up.

Paert of storage may be used as NAS.
a c 127 G Storage
February 28, 2010 1:32:39 PM

Well you need to explain what OS you will be running; what RAID engine you will be running (software RAID, FakeRAID on motherboard or hardware RAID?) before i can give any targeted advice.

If you're on Linux, using software RAID might be your best bet. If you're on Windows, Hardware RAID might not be such a bad thing.

If you really care about performance and reliability, wouldn't an SSD be much more logical? Or you really need to large storage space HDDs provide?
m
0
l
a b G Storage
February 28, 2010 11:39:01 PM

Hi newcomer and welcome to the Tom's hardware forum.

The best RAID options for a server are:

1- Mirror array of the OS partition.
2- RAID 5 array for the database and others.
m
0
l
Related resources
March 7, 2010 11:36:31 PM

sub mesa said:
Well you need to explain what OS you will be running; what RAID engine you will be running (software RAID, FakeRAID on motherboard or hardware RAID?) before i can give any targeted advice.

If you're on Linux, using software RAID might be your best bet. If you're on Windows, Hardware RAID might not be such a bad thing.

If you really care about performance and reliability, wouldn't an SSD be much more logical? Or you really need to large storage space HDDs provide?


sub mesa said:
Well you need to explain what OS you will be running; what RAID engine you will be running (software RAID, FakeRAID on motherboard or hardware RAID?) before i can give any targeted advice.

If you're on Linux, using software RAID might be your best bet. If you're on Windows, Hardware RAID might not be such a bad thing.

If you really care about performance and reliability, wouldn't an SSD be much more logical? Or you really need to large storage space HDDs provide?


Going to use Linux. Looking for 500GB to 1TB storage space. Why software RAID on linux, why not hardware RAID on Linux. I feel hardware raid is going to over perform.

SDD is going to be bit expensive, so decided to go with SATA. I decided to use RAID 10 for storage as it costs little bit more than RAID 5 in term of money, and buys better speed.

I am looking for what RAID controller, disk, cpu, mother board I should be using.
m
0
l
a c 127 G Storage
March 9, 2010 11:24:05 AM

Software, hardware doesn't give you any benefit really. Software RAID is generally superior.
m
0
l
a b G Storage
March 9, 2010 12:05:01 PM

saint19 said:
Hi newcomer and welcome to the Tom's hardware forum.

The best RAID options for a server are:

1- Mirror array of the OS partition.
2- RAID 5 array for the database and others.


It actually depends on how high performance you are looking for. For a good database server, you want at least 3 distinct physical drives (or sets of drives, the underlying RAID gives you redundancy). 1 for the OS/swap, 1 for data, 1 for audit/log/redo files (depending on which DB). RAID 10 from what I've seen gives you the highest number of IOs in a random database environment. RAID 5 might save you some money, but is not better performing.

http://www.dba-oracle.com/oracle_tips_raid_usage.htm

http://www.rampant-books.com/t_oracle_raid.htm

http://www.orafaq.com/wiki/RAID - "Oracle refers to RAID 10 as SAME - Stripe and Mirror Everything, in which Everything merely means datafiles, tempfiles, redo logs and controlfiles.

RAID 10 is the ideal RAID level in terms of performance and availability, but it can be expensive as it requires at least twice the amount of disk space. If money is no objective, always choose RAID 10! "

I focused on Oracle here, but the concepts apply to any database. Obviously, a lot depends on your budget, and what you are trying to do. Databases can be complex, you need to know what you are doing for performance and to prevent data loss. Again, just based on my previous Oracle work, there are technologies such as ASM (automatic storage management), or alternately look at what Oracle calls OFA (optimal flexible architecture?? - it's been a while). These terms are Oracle specific but the concepts of spreading out DB info can be applied to any DB.
m
0
l
a b G Storage
March 9, 2010 12:06:20 PM

sub mesa said:
Software, hardware doesn't give you any benefit really. Software RAID is generally superior.


Doesn't hardware RAID offload processing from the CPU to a dedicated processor? The enterprise raid controllers I've worked with are also more sophisticated. I would not make that blanket statement.
m
0
l
a c 127 G Storage
March 9, 2010 12:16:10 PM

offloading to a 500MHz CPU yes; while you have a 3GHz quadcore or whatever in your host system; which is going to be faster you think?

And its not the parity calculations that are heavy, its the combining and splitting of I/O that is very memory intensive; that's what causes RAID5 to have more processing overhead. The parity calculations itself goes at memory speed (4GB/s+).

There is no reason a hardware controller would be better than a good software driver. Software has the fastest hardware available, and it doesn't have increased latency all hardware RAID has; the onboard SATA ports are extremely low latency.

Especially for simple levels like RAID0 and RAID1, using hardware RAID would slow down I/O slightly; its a solution inferior to a good software solution.
m
0
l
Anonymous
a b G Storage
September 10, 2010 10:54:09 AM

I am sorry to revive this thread, but I am doing some research to the same thing.

Although I think that what Sub Mesa said sounds plausible, I still think there is a risk with software raid. Maybe I am wrong and then I like to know that, but it seems to me that a software raid has a higher risk to fail as it uses the OS. So when the OS fails, your raid configuration will fail as well. If this is true, wouldn't it be more sensible to use a hardware raid as it will be separated from the OS?

Another question, is it possible to have redundant raid controllers?
m
0
l
!