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Best HDTV anteena

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Anonymous
February 7, 2005 4:53:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.equipment.broadcast,alt.video.digital-tv,alt.video.tv-sets,rec.video (More info?)

Can someone more familiar with the market recommend some good attic-mount
antennas for over-the-air HDTV? Brand and model nos. appreciated.

Many thanks.

More about : hdtv anteena

Anonymous
February 7, 2005 4:53:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.equipment.broadcast,alt.video.digital-tv,alt.video.tv-sets,rec.video (More info?)

"Andrew Chalk" <achalk@XXXmagnacartasoftware.com> wrote in message
news:ISzNd.37991$iC4.36864@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
> Can someone more familiar with the market recommend some good attic-mount
> antennas for over-the-air HDTV? Brand and model nos. appreciated.

Tough job. You need to tell us whether you want UHF, VHF or both, as well
as
how far away the transmitters are.

Maybe you know a few because you see their towers. For others, you can call
the station and ask where
they transmit from or you can go to the FCC website and look up the stations
you don't know. See
http://www.fcc.gov/mb/video/tvq.html

Even through you asked about attic-mount, putting a recommended outdoor
antenna from
http://www.antennaweb.org/aw/welcome.aspx in your attic may work for you.
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 7:12:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.equipment.broadcast,alt.video.digital-tv,alt.video.tv-sets,rec.video (More info?)

Thanks. In this case the only thing I want is over-the-air HDTV. I thought
these were all being pushed out of UHF into VHF.

- Andrew
"Sal M. Onella" <salmonella@food.poisoning.org> wrote in message
news:jQANd.33433$0u.18166@fed1read04...
>
> "Andrew Chalk" <achalk@XXXmagnacartasoftware.com> wrote in message
> news:ISzNd.37991$iC4.36864@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
> > Can someone more familiar with the market recommend some good
attic-mount
> > antennas for over-the-air HDTV? Brand and model nos. appreciated.
>
> Tough job. You need to tell us whether you want UHF, VHF or both, as
well
> as
> how far away the transmitters are.
>
> Maybe you know a few because you see their towers. For others, you can
call
> the station and ask where
> they transmit from or you can go to the FCC website and look up the
stations
> you don't know. See
> http://www.fcc.gov/mb/video/tvq.html
>
> Even through you asked about attic-mount, putting a recommended outdoor
> antenna from
> http://www.antennaweb.org/aw/welcome.aspx in your attic may work for you.
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 7:12:12 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.equipment.broadcast,alt.video.digital-tv,alt.video.tv-sets,rec.video (More info?)

"Andrew Chalk" <achalk@XXXmagnacartasoftware.com> wrote in message
news:vUBNd.26621$wi2.11967@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
> Thanks. In this case the only thing I want is over-the-air HDTV. I thought
> these were all being pushed out of UHF into VHF.

Yes, I think this is the FCC's stated goal, for 2009; however, some big
city stations (Chicago and Dallas, for sure) have some HD on VHF. In
SoCal, where I live, the whole VHF rack is full, so our digitals are all
UHF.

That FCC website is extremely thorough and detailed. You can, for example,
enter your location by LAT and LONG, specify a distance radius and TV
service (DT, for example) and the computer will list all the stations.
Then, if you click each station, you can see how much power they're using
and conclude whether you should even try to receive their signal.

It is worth it, however, as the pictures are just beautiful. As a bonus,
some broadcasters are multiplexing on their DT signals. Our KOCE, KPBS,
KLCS and KCET public stations all have two or more programs going out
simultaneously. Two of them, KPBS and KCET usually have one HD program and
one SD program. KNBC and KNSD have the NBC national weather service as a
second program. (It is just starting up and they are bad, bad, bad. Was
the Weather Channel this bad 20 years ago? I don't remember.) KABC has ABC
programs, plus local news tapes plus SoCal Doppler Radar on their three
channels. (I don't know what they'll put on the radar channel during the
summer, when it will likely be blank for months -- not reruns, I'm sure :-)

If you are just wanting UHF, the reliable 4-bay bow-tie antenna is a winner.
If your signals come from more than one direction, you can fit it with a
rotator. Such a rig will fit in most attics ... I have done it.
Alternatively, two or more 4-bay bowtie antennas, each feeding a good
quality coaxial switch near the TV, can be aimed to the desired directions
from within the attic. That is my current arrangement.
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 11:43:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.equipment.broadcast,alt.video.digital-tv,alt.video.tv-sets,rec.video (More info?)

Hmm.. that sight suggests that the digital signals are all UHF. Does
'digital' imply HDTV?

- Andrew
"Andrew Chalk" <achalk@XXXmagnacartasoftware.com> wrote in message
news:vUBNd.26621$wi2.11967@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
> Thanks. In this case the only thing I want is over-the-air HDTV. I thought
> these were all being pushed out of UHF into VHF.
>
> - Andrew
> "Sal M. Onella" <salmonella@food.poisoning.org> wrote in message
> news:jQANd.33433$0u.18166@fed1read04...
> >
> > "Andrew Chalk" <achalk@XXXmagnacartasoftware.com> wrote in message
> > news:ISzNd.37991$iC4.36864@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
> > > Can someone more familiar with the market recommend some good
> attic-mount
> > > antennas for over-the-air HDTV? Brand and model nos. appreciated.
> >
> > Tough job. You need to tell us whether you want UHF, VHF or both, as
> well
> > as
> > how far away the transmitters are.
> >
> > Maybe you know a few because you see their towers. For others, you can
> call
> > the station and ask where
> > they transmit from or you can go to the FCC website and look up the
> stations
> > you don't know. See
> > http://www.fcc.gov/mb/video/tvq.html
> >
> > Even through you asked about attic-mount, putting a recommended outdoor
> > antenna from
> > http://www.antennaweb.org/aw/welcome.aspx in your attic may work for
you.
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 1:09:20 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.equipment.broadcast,alt.video.digital-tv,alt.video.tv-sets,rec.video (More info?)

Sal M. Onella wrote:


>
>>Thanks. In this case the only thing I want is over-the-air HDTV. I thought
>>these were all being pushed out of UHF into VHF.
>
>
> Yes, I think this is the FCC's stated goal, for 2009;

Incorrect. The idea of digital is to push TV out
of channels 52-69. Channels 2-68 (except 37)
will remain. To make channels 2-6 work well will require
substantialluy more power than is used now for them,
and perhaps even more than for analog TV, but with
say 200 kW average power they will work very well.


Doug McDonald
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 2:42:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.equipment.broadcast,alt.video.digital-tv,alt.video.tv-sets,rec.video (More info?)

"Andrew Chalk" <achalk@XXXmagnacartasoftware.com> wrote in message
news:4TFNd.26770$wi2.21541@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
> Hmm.. that sight suggests that the digital signals are all UHF. Does
> 'digital' imply HDTV?

Yes and no.

What we have today in both the U.S. and many other countries are
new digital television broadcast standards, such as the "ATSC"
system in the U.S., and "DVB" in much of the rest of the world. These
systems will accomodate both standard-definition (i.e., 480- or 576-line)
and high-definition (720-line and above) programming. So you can
most certainly be watching "digital" television and yet not be
watching "HDTV". Having said that, most of the over-the-air
terrestrial digital in the U.S. right now is "HD". (As opposed to, say.
direct satellite services such as DirecTV or DISH Network, where
the programming is all digital but only a minority of it is "HD".)

Bob M.
February 7, 2005 5:18:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.digital-tv (More info?)

On Sun, 6 Feb 2005 21:07:42 -0800, "Sal M. Onella"
<salmonella@food.poisoning.org> wrote:


>Yes, I think this is the FCC's stated goal, for 2009; however, some big
>city stations (Chicago and Dallas, for sure) have some HD on VHF. In
>SoCal, where I live, the whole VHF rack is full, so our digitals are all
>UHF.

Correct for Chicago, but only one digital station (CBS) here is on
VHF, the other 15 or so are all UHF.
Anonymous
February 8, 2005 12:26:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.equipment.broadcast,alt.video.digital-tv,alt.video.tv-sets,rec.video (More info?)

"Doug McDonald" <mcdonald@SnPoAM_scs.uiuc.edu> wrote in message
news:cu83rj$7of$1@news.ks.uiuc.edu...
> Sal M. Onella wrote:
>
>
> >
> >>Thanks. In this case the only thing I want is over-the-air HDTV. I
thought
> >>these were all being pushed out of UHF into VHF.
> >
> >
> > Yes, I think this is the FCC's stated goal, for 2009;
>
> Incorrect. The idea of digital is to push TV out
> of channels 52-69. Channels 2-68 (except 37)
> will remain.

< snip >

Thanks for the correction.
Anonymous
February 8, 2005 12:37:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.equipment.broadcast,alt.video.digital-tv,alt.video.tv-sets,rec.video (More info?)

Thansk!
"Bob Myers" <nospamplease@address.invalid> wrote in message
news:4207b7b5$1@usenet01.boi.hp.com...
>
> "Andrew Chalk" <achalk@XXXmagnacartasoftware.com> wrote in message
> news:4TFNd.26770$wi2.21541@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
> > Hmm.. that sight suggests that the digital signals are all UHF. Does
> > 'digital' imply HDTV?
>
> Yes and no.
>
> What we have today in both the U.S. and many other countries are
> new digital television broadcast standards, such as the "ATSC"
> system in the U.S., and "DVB" in much of the rest of the world. These
> systems will accomodate both standard-definition (i.e., 480- or 576-line)
> and high-definition (720-line and above) programming. So you can
> most certainly be watching "digital" television and yet not be
> watching "HDTV". Having said that, most of the over-the-air
> terrestrial digital in the U.S. right now is "HD". (As opposed to, say.
> direct satellite services such as DirecTV or DISH Network, where
> the programming is all digital but only a minority of it is "HD".)
>
> Bob M.
>
>
Anonymous
February 8, 2005 12:44:10 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.equipment.broadcast,alt.video.digital-tv,alt.video.tv-sets,rec.video (More info?)

"Bob Myers" <nospamplease@address.invalid> wrote in message
news:4207b7b5$1@usenet01.boi.hp.com...
>
> "Andrew Chalk" <achalk@XXXmagnacartasoftware.com> wrote in message
> news:4TFNd.26770$wi2.21541@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
> > Hmm.. that sight suggests that the digital signals are all UHF. Does
> > 'digital' imply HDTV?
>
> Yes and no.
>
> What we have today in both the U.S. and many other countries are
> new digital television broadcast standards, such as the "ATSC"
> system in the U.S., and "DVB" in much of the rest of the world. These
> systems will accomodate both standard-definition (i.e., 480- or 576-line)
> and high-definition (720-line and above) programming. So you can
> most certainly be watching "digital" television and yet not be
> watching "HDTV". Having said that, most of the over-the-air
> terrestrial digital in the U.S. right now is "HD". (As opposed to, say.
> direct satellite services such as DirecTV or DISH Network, where
> the programming is all digital but only a minority of it is "HD".)

As I understand it, all digital transmitters will support more than one
program at a time, although not all broadcasters use the capability. The
primary channel is always -1 (spoken as, "dash one", I presume). The
additional channels might be -2, -3, etc. For example, KOCE, Orange County
Educational, puts out three programs -- on channels 50-1, 50-2 and 50-3, all
from the same transmitter. Some broadcasters have digital HD on air most or
all the time, but when they are doing HD, they can only have one additional
program, and it will be in SD. For example, KPBS is San Diego has always
had an HD program on 15-1 every time I've tuned it in. 15-2 is their
regular" TV channel (same program as on their analog transmission).
So, in this country, all HDTV is digital, but digital is HDTV only when the
station chooses to broadcast it, which might be never.
Anonymous
February 8, 2005 2:56:35 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.equipment.broadcast,alt.video.digital-tv,alt.video.tv-sets,rec.video (More info?)

Sal M. Onella (salmonella@food.poisoning.org) wrote in alt.video.digital-tv:
> As I understand it, all digital transmitters will support more than one
> program at a time, although not all broadcasters use the capability. The
> primary channel is always -1 (spoken as, "dash one", I presume).

This isn't true. There is no rule as to what sub-channel must be used for
the "primary" channel. Locally, I have *two* stations that use -3 for the
"primary" and -4 for their weather radar, and one station that doesn't
multicast at all and uses -2 for the only sub-channel.

Using PSIP, most STBs re-map them to -1, -2, etc., because they are the
first, second, etc., sub-channels found. But, when one station was having
PSIP problems, other people couldn't receive it without a channel re-scan,
but my receivers that are set to use the un-mapped sub-channel IDs had
no problems.

--
Jeff Rife | "I'm reading a great John Grisham novel...it's
| about a young Southern lawyer who fights an
| evil corporate giant."
| -- Dick Solomon, "3rd Rock from the Sun"
Anonymous
February 8, 2005 9:52:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.equipment.broadcast,alt.video.digital-tv,alt.video.tv-sets,rec.video (More info?)

In article <JkYNd.33821$0u.22209@fed1read04>,
"Sal M. Onella" <salmonella@food.poisoning.org> wrote:


> from the same transmitter. Some broadcasters have digital HD on air most or
> all the time, but when they are doing HD, they can only have one additional
> program, and it will be in SD. For example, KPBS is San Diego has always
> had an HD program on 15-1 every time I've tuned it in. 15-2 is their
> regular" TV channel (same program as on their analog transmission).
> So, in this country, all HDTV is digital, but digital is HDTV only when the
> station chooses to broadcast it, which might be never.

This isn't true either. We run a 1080i signal full time ( granted 3/4 of
the day is it UPCONVERTED 1080i, but still a valid 1080i format ).
We also run a second channel, which we call 7too (7.2) that is a "new"
tv station running some news repeats and also old shows like GreenAcres
and such. We run a 3rd channel, a WX channel, just maps, 2M bandwidth.

The PBS station in town runs 5. The first two are SD, the second two are
SB with simply an ID, and the 5th is PBS HD. They look pretty good.

So, you CAN have more than one additional program while running HD.

Alan
Anonymous
February 9, 2005 1:19:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.equipment.broadcast,alt.video.digital-tv,alt.video.tv-sets,rec.video (More info?)

"Alan N" <alann19@cox.net> wrote in message
news:alann19-17EE0A.18524608022005@news.east.cox.net...
> In article <JkYNd.33821$0u.22209@fed1read04>,
> "Sal M. Onella" <salmonella@food.poisoning.org> wrote:
>
>
> > Some broadcasters have digital HD on air most or
> > all the time, but when they are doing HD, they can only have one
additional
> > program, and it will be in SD.

> The PBS station in town runs 5. The first two are SD, the second two are
> SB with simply an ID, and the 5th is PBS HD. They look pretty good.
>
> So, you CAN have more than one additional program while running HD.
>
> Alan

Right you are. I don't remember where I got the original "bum-dope" from,
but I have
banished it. Thanks.
Anonymous
February 9, 2005 1:27:56 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.equipment.broadcast,alt.video.digital-tv,alt.video.tv-sets,rec.video (More info?)

"Jeff Rife" <wevsr@nabs.net> wrote in message
news:MPG.1c72b95211911844989b51@news.nabs.net...
> Sal M. Onella (salmonella@food.poisoning.org) wrote in
alt.video.digital-tv:
> > As I understand it, all digital transmitters will support more than one
> > program at a time, although not all broadcasters use the capability.
The
> > primary channel is always -1 (spoken as, "dash one", I presume).
>
> This isn't true. There is no rule as to what sub-channel must be used for
> the "primary" channel. Locally, I have *two* stations that use -3 for the
> "primary" and -4 for their weather radar, and one station that doesn't
> multicast at all and uses -2 for the only sub-channel.
>
> Using PSIP, most STBs re-map them to -1, -2, etc., because they are the
> first, second, etc., sub-channels found. But, when one station was having
> PSIP problems, other people couldn't receive it without a channel re-scan,
> but my receivers that are set to use the un-mapped sub-channel IDs had
> no problems.

What I meant was that I always get a "dash-one", whether or not there are
any additional channels. It's the display generated by my STB. I put it
poorly. "Regular" KPBS programming is on -2.
!