Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

External 1TB WD

Last response: in Storage
Share
March 3, 2010 4:04:20 AM

I occassionally watch movie's on my HD media player connected to my TV downstairs which I bought a few years back. I have a 250GB HD but it has an external power source (powerblock included) which has been very frustrating to drag around. I'm looking for a 1TB external HD without an external power source.
I noticed that the mypassport by WD looks very attractive but the review's are plagued with pre-installed software & connection issues.

Does anyone have any suggestions or recommendations?

More about : external 1tb

a c 329 G Storage
March 4, 2010 1:20:26 PM

Virtually EVERY external HDD unit based on the 3½" HDD size (the ones used as internals in desktops) will have its own power supply, and it SHOULD! These units consume more power than you can get from any USB port - the USB spec has an upper limit on how much power a port can provide. There are 3 ways around this:
1. Look only for external HDD units designed for use with laptop machines and based on the smaller laptop drive units. They use less power and have much smaller capacities, so many of them are available with no power brick. Some, however, use more power than a USB port can provide still. Those ones use the trick of connecting to TWO USB ports on your machine and drawing power from both of them to work. On a per-GB basis these are more expensive, but you can find units meeting your primary requirement.
2. Try to find an older external HDD made with a small desktop format drive that happens to have no power supply of its own. At this point it's likely to be older and used, and of low capacity.
3. Compromise - get a modern unit that requires its own power supply, but look particularly for one that has the power supply circuitry built into the case itself. That way the only cord involved is a relatively simple power cord from wall to drive unit, with no wall wart or flimsy low-voltage wires. It's still an extra cord, but maybe more convenient. You might consider it important whether this cord is permanently attached to the drive unit, or is removable. Removable might be handier for storage and transportation, but you do have a risk of losing or forgetting it.
Related resources
a c 329 G Storage
March 5, 2010 2:04:14 PM

Thanks to sminlal for pointing out that unit by WD. It IS a 1TB unit based on the larger (3½") form factor HDD inside, and it DOES use only one USB connection with NO other power supply required, it seems. I had not seen that combination before.

The user comments on that site are interesting, and a few point out a useful way to avoid problems some have had with included software.
a c 415 G Storage
March 5, 2010 4:24:21 PM

Paperdoc said:
It IS a 1TB unit based on the larger (3½") form factor HDD inside
No, the internal drive IS a 2-1/2" drive. The external enclosure is only 3.2" wide, so there's hardly room for a 3-1/2" drive inside it.

This unit uses the WD drives that were announced last year: http://www.cybertheater.com/western-digital-has-25-inch...

Note that although these are 2.5" drives, the bare drives are thicker than the standard laptop form factor so they won't work inside most laptops.
a c 329 G Storage
March 5, 2010 8:33:18 PM

You are right about the case dimension, of course. I was thrown of by the product description on that site under "Product Tour" tab, "High Performance Hard Drive" where it says it "is equipped with a high performance 3.5” hard drive ". I didn't check the product dimensions and spot their typo. But this makes a bit more sense. I am accustomed to seeing portable HDD units for laptop users based on the 2½" form and using less power. This one has nearly the max capacity I've seen in this form factor, PLUS it still only uses ONE USB connection.
April 5, 2011 5:53:24 AM

western digital my passport essential 1tb
Virtually EVERY external HDD unit based on the 3½" HDD size (the ones used as internals in desktops) will have its own power supply, and it SHOULD! These units consume more power than you can get from any USB port - the USB spec has an upper limit on how much power a port can provide. There are 3 ways around this:
1. Look only for external HDD units designed for use with laptop machines and based on the smaller laptop drive units. They use less power and have much smaller capacities, so many of them are available with no power brick. Some, however, use more power than a USB port can provide still. Those ones use the trick of connecting to TWO USB ports on your machine and drawing power from both of them to work. On a per-GB basis these are more expensive, but you can find units meeting your primary requirement.
2. Try to find an older external HDD made with a small desktop format drive that happens to have no power supply of its own. At this point it's likely to be older and used, and of low capacity.
!