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My New Gaming Rig

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September 29, 2008 1:56:53 PM

Hi all, Im fairly new to the forums and am looking for some feedback regarding my new pc whch i intend to build in the coming Months. Theses are the specs:

Case: Antec Nine Hundred Tower Gaming Case with S/Window No PSU.

Power Supply: Thermaltake 850W ToughPower power supply.

Video Card: XFX GX-260N-ADD9 Geforce GTX260 XXX Edition, 896MB GDDR3, PCI Express 2.0, Dual DVI, HDTV, 3way SLI, 640/2300mhz.

Monitor: ASUS VW222U 22" Wide LCD Monitor 2ms 2000:1 HDCP Speakers.

Motherboard: eVGA 132-CK-NF79-A1 nForce 790i Ultra SLI Mainboard.

CPU: Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550 CPU, 2.83 GHz, FSB 1333MHz, 2x6MB L2 Cache, Socket LGA775.

RAM: OCZ 4GB Gold Edition Memory Kit, 2x 2GB, PC3-8500, DDR3 1066MHz, 240-pin DIMM (OCZ3G10664GK).

Hard Disk Drive: Samsung SpinPoint 750GB SATA II 7200rpm 32Mb SATA Hard Drive.

Operating System: Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium OEM DVD SP1 (64 – Bit).

DVD Drive: 22 x Dual Layer DVD SATA Black Drive.

Cooling: Asus Silent Square EVO CPU Cooler, Aluminum, Compatible with Intel LGA775/ AMD 754/939/940/AM2, 2300rpm, 22dBA, VAPO Bearing.



Jus give me some feedback let me know of an recomendations. BTW my budget is about $2,500.

Thanks in Advance

More about : gaming rig

September 29, 2008 2:50:59 PM

I am a bit biased but I would recommend switching to a x38/x48 based MOBO and the 4850 (1mb version) GPU. Better rating, better value. also, you chose a mobo with DDR3. At this point I would recommend staying with DDR2. There are plenty of DDR2 vs. DDR3 comparisons on this web site. So far none of the DDR3 boards/mem show much/any advantage over the DDR2 based systems.

RAM
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
mushkin 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory - Retail

MOBO-
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
ASUS RAMPAGE FORMULA LGA 775 Intel X48 ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail

GPU-
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
SAPPHIRE 100242-1GL Radeon HD 4850 1GB 256-bit GDDR3 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFire Supported Video Card - Retail
September 29, 2008 4:30:49 PM

If you want to stay with an ASUS line, then I'd recommend this one instead to save $50, since the X48 brings in no extra performance to the table.

ASUS P5E LGA 775 Intel X38 ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I'd also get these instead, you won't be making use of that 1GB at a 1680x1050 res anyway (You'd need 2560x1600 or 1920x1200 with a lot of AA for it to matter)

(2 of these) GIGABYTE GV-R485ZL-512H Radeon HD 4850 512MB 256-bit GDDR3 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFire Supported Video Card - Retail

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Agreed on the points made on the above post though, and on the memory.
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September 30, 2008 12:18:36 AM

Thanks for the feedback guys.

Quote:
I am a bit biased but I would recommend switching to a x38/x48 based MOBO and the 4850 (1mb version) GPU. Better rating, better value. also, you chose a mobo with DDR3. At this point I would recommend staying with DDR2. There are plenty of DDR2 vs. DDR3 comparisons on this web site. So far none of the DDR3 boards/mem show much/any advantage over the DDR2 based systems.


The main reson i want the MOBO and DDR3 is because i really want my computer to last 3 or 4 possibly 5 years with only minor upgrades, this includes SLI (Possibly TRI-SLI). Thanks for the feedback.

Quote:
I'd also get these instead, you won't be making use of that 1GB at a 1680x1050 res anyway (You'd need 2560x1600 or 1920x1200 with a lot of AA for it to matter)


In regard to that in the coming months i hope to be getting a new 24" monitor aswell.

So really the main reason for all the parts, and the MOBO, DDR3 Ram, GTX260, is that i want the computer computer to be futureproof. ie. with only minor upgrades.
September 30, 2008 7:30:25 AM

Sorry but I don't think no matter how you build it today you get it to fully last those last 4-5 years and to be able to perform somewhat decently. Your best bet is to probably build a cheap-mid range gaming rig and than to build a new one in 2-3 years and to just reuse some of the parts (dvd drive, power supply, case, etc)

And to just point something out, you won't be able to really throw anything all that much better into that mobo in a few years no matter what, since that socket type is at end of its life (nehalem uses a new socket type). The PCIe 2.0 will be of use espically with sli capabilities, but your cards will eventually be gimped by the CPU. And if there is no difference between DDR2 and DDR3 now, than I doubt there will be one in the future if your still using the same thing,

Sorry had to rain on your parade for the "future proof" idea but I had to, since I've wasted too much money on my laptop thinking the same thing a few years back. Got it in december in 2004 and in less than 2 years i was already wondering if I could play some games. My friend did the same thing twice, once with a laptop built a few months before mine, very hi-end XPS laptop after a year or 2 he broke down and had to build a new hi-end computer because the thing couldn't keep up with games and tasks he was doing before. Funny thing is he spent around 3-4k on it, and when I built my computer less than a year latter I could build something even better for less than 1k.

Sorry for rambling on, but moral of my post is, there is no such thing as future proof no matter how far you upgrade something today, it be obsolete tommrow. Sorry if I came off a a bit of a jerk (yeah just re-read it), but just had to share my experiences when I had this idea, and bring about the whole mid-range build, and rebuild it again in a few years concept (something I wish I thought of than). And yeah I don't normally post this kind of stuff, but from what you had in your budget $2,500 and how long you expected it to last in your last post, kindve inspired me to write something this long, so you know what you be getting yourself into.

September 30, 2008 7:57:43 AM

Thanks for your post and it does make sense, here is a revised version of my build:

Case - Cooler Master HAF RC-932, SECC, USB 2.0 x 4, IEEE1394a x1, eSATA x 1, Mic x 1, Audio x 1 (RC-932-KKN1).

Power Supply - OCZ 850W GameXStream Power Supply (NVIDIA SLI-Ready).

Graphics Card - XFX Geforce 9800GTX+, 512MB GDDR3, PCIE2.0, Dual DVI, HDMI, HDCP, SLI, PhysX, 738/2200mhz (PV-T98W-YDFH).

Monitor - ASUS VW222U 22" Wide LCD Monitor 2ms 2000:1 HDCP Speakers.

Motherboard - eVGA 132-CK-NF79-A1 nForce 790i Ultra SLI Mainboard .

CPU - Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550 CPU, 2.83 GHz, FSB 1333MHz, 2x6MB L2 Cache, Socket LGA775.

RAM - OCZ 4GB Gold Edition Memory Kit, 2x 2GB, PC3-8500, DDR3 1066MHz, 240-pin DIMM (OCZ3G10664GK).

Hard Disk Drive - Samsung SpinPoint 750GB SATA II 7200rpm 32Mb SATA Hard Drive .

Operating System - Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium OEM DVD SP1 (64 – Bit).

DVD Drive - 22 x Dual Layer DVD SATA Black Drive.

Cooling - Zalman CNPS9700NT CPU Cooler, 2-Ball bearing, Multi Socket, Ultra Quiet 110mm PWM Fan with green LED, 2 Modes operation: Normal and Silent Noise (CNPS9700NT).

I understand what you are saying, i curently havn't got the money for it yet i will hopefully have it by about march next year. From what i hear Nehalem will be out by then (fingers crossed) im hoping this will bring about a drop in prices. If anyone has any price info ragrding Nehalem and the new mobos please post. If the prices are reasnable enough ill go with it.

But in the meantime im only Fourteen and i want this cmputer to last 3-4 if not 5 years with only minor upgrades as previously stated, i will mainy be using it for gaming, video, and photo editing. With my SLi motherboard and a new power supply in the future i could have 3 gtx 280's and they should be able to keep up with the newest games out there, now that more games are using CF and SLI. So IMO (not trying to turn my back on your advice) i think with my system able to hold its own in the years to come considering it takes up to 3 PCIE 2.0 Video Cards Possibly, a New Quad-Core Exreme CPU ,some nice water cooling, IMO with all this my PC will be running the newest games for years to come.


In regard to the cooling is water and liquid cooling he same thing? Also can someone recommend a good budge one to me, it's just for the CPU. Thanks in advance.
September 30, 2008 9:21:51 AM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nehalem_(microarchitecture)

For more info on Nehalem, including prices.

As for the tri-sli 280gtx, I think you will need more than 850watt power supply though, not sure though. I think a 1.2k power supply is what is recomended going off memory, but if your waiting till next march than by than the 280gtx will probably drop in price and no longer be top dog.

And Nehalem will most likely be worth it, espically since the price difference probably won't be too outragous when it comes out (after a few months most likely), since they are trying to get people to build all new machines (ddr3, and new socket so they new a new mobo) instead of price gouging it out forever.

Oh and just a little note on intel's extreme cpu's is that it is just an ordinary CPU with the multiplier unlocked so it is easier to OC, but you can usually push the normal CPU's high enough as it is. So it's probably worth looking into OC a normal CPU than buying the extreme, you can save quite a bit of money that way. I recomend reading the article that is stickied on how to OC an duel/quad core CPU before thinking about buying an extreme edition CPU, as I be surprised if you couldn't push the standard version to how fast the extreme edition comes "stock".

And if you ever do go the water cooling route, research it thoroughly, and you can usually find some really knowledgeable people on the forums concerning that (im definately not one of them). I definately recomend posting on the forum or talking to someone knowledgable in this area before buying anything to do with watercooling since buying an inferior part can be costly if something bad happens, or it just may be rip off and provide inferrior cooling. I also heard something about being able to use a non-conductive liquid instead of water which may be worth looking into, as it may save you big time incase something bad happens and you spring a leak. Though personally I doubt you need a water cooling system as long as you get a good CPU heatsink and case. Which that cooler master case will definately provide good ventilation and look good doing it.

Oh and just something else I thought of when you mentioned your age. If you do end up building a very hi-end power hungry machine make sure it's alright with your parents, as it may just raise the electricity bill a bit if you have it on all the time. And just for reference just because a power supply says its a 850watt power supply doesn't mean it will draw 850watts, it will only draw as much power as it needs, so naturally it will use a little bit of power when idle and alot when it's under a full load.
September 30, 2008 2:19:34 PM

+1 to assasin's posts, It's extremely naive at best to think that PC will last you that long with only minor upgrades and still be powerful enough to play the latest games, the best cost-effective route is to build $1200-1400 systems every 3 years.

It would be more logical for you (especially with the kind of budget that you have) to wait for Nehalem and get a system there, since you seem adamant on getting a system and not tinkering it with it for a long time. But if you are still thinking the same way after 3 posts giving you advice against getting this type of build, then I don't know why you posted this in the first place, if you aren't going to take anyone's opinions into consideration.
October 1, 2008 12:39:26 AM

OK heres my situation,

Two of my frineds both built PC's 4 years ago one with a core 2 duo extreme one with a pentium D, the first an 8800gtx the second a 7600gt, both of these people are still playing currnet games, the first spent $2000 and he is still playing crysis on high, the second recently upgraded to a 9600 and e8200 and also plays crysis on high.

The second person spent $1000 - $1500 on each build and he aslo had to go throguh the trouble of getting all the new parts and assembling them, tinkering and so forth. The first one however has had no troubles and if he wants he can tri-SLI and own my friend for the same price the second friend payed in the long run.

Consider that and then post.

EDIT: Also if i go with Nehalem next year then my pc will be unrestricted by upgrade capabilites in the next 5-7 years.
October 1, 2008 1:41:20 AM

Well let me start with by saying that neither of those computers were even out on the market 4 years ago (That was more like Athlon 64 and Geforce 6/Radeon X800 time time to shine). The C2D and Geforce 8 series came out roughly 2 years ago, the Pentium D and Geforce 7 about 3 and a half years ago.

Your friend had amazing foresight, the Core 2 arch is an extremely good performer and the 8800GTX has held it's own even to this day, this is because he bought the stuff right on release and bought the right stuff.

Your second friend however bought a decent midrange performer (7600GT) for it's time, but it became quickly outdated (especially on shader-heavy titles), and the Pentium D was a failure since it's inception. This whole anecdote can be summed up by saying that one of your friends knew exactly what he was buying, while the other... not so much.

With that said, you're buying Core 2 arch almost before the release of the new Nehalem arch and nvidia cards that are currently are second rate midrange choices at best due to Ati's superiority. (Your friend bought the 8800GTX and it was god at the time, similar to what the HD 4870 X2 is right now.)

I get the feeling you don't want have to really touch the insides of your machine for a long while, if that's the case, then I suggest that you follow the same path that you 8800GTX friend, by waiting for Nehalem and getting it on release (obviously not the Extreme edition CPU, but one of the other two, more affordable offerings) along with an HD 4870 X2.
October 1, 2008 2:04:10 AM

emp has the right idea in the post above me. If you want longevity out of this system, be an early nehalem adopter. Get the ~$284 processor, which apparently clocks high, an X58 motherboard, triple channel some decent DDR3 RAM, and a 4870X2. These things will last for sure. pci-e 1.0 has barely reached full bandwidth saturation, and so you know that the amount of bandwidth you're getting from the pci-e 2.0 this motherboard will last in terms of graphics. Processor wise, you'll be getting a quad core with 8 threads, so this is sure to last well into the day we see multi-threaded games become common place. Nehalem screams longevity, you're best going with that. Be sure to post back here when you got money to spend, because we're all about helping peeps like you make the right choices.
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