Transfering "My Documents" to its own partition

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Hi
Will transfering "My Documents" to its own partition cause any problems with
the OS or NTFS and is this procedure recommended by Microsoft? Why do "My
Documents and Settings" and "My Documents" appear so often in "Explore"?
Please recommend any reading material on these subjects. Thanks.
2 answers Last reply
More about transfering documents partition
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    How to Change the Default Location of the My Documents Folder
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;310147

    --
    Carey Frisch
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows XP - Shell/User
    Microsoft Newsgroups

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    "firewire" wrote:

    | Hi
    | Will transfering "My Documents" to its own partition cause any problems with
    | the OS or NTFS and is this procedure recommended by Microsoft? Why do "My
    | Documents and Settings" and "My Documents" appear so often in "Explore"?
    | Please recommend any reading material on these subjects. Thanks.
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    firewire wrote:
    > Will transfering "My Documents" to its own partition cause any
    > problems with the OS or NTFS and is this procedure recommended by
    > Microsoft? Why do "My Documents and Settings" and "My Documents"
    > appear so often in "Explore"? Please recommend any reading material
    > on these subjects. Thanks.

    In the future - if you feel you must - cross-post instead of multi-posting..
    Please.

    Your "Documents and Settings" folder is different from your "My Documents"
    folder.

    The %systemroot%\Documents and Settings\ folder is where every user's
    profile is stored.

    Under each of those users profile directories is usually a folder called "My
    Documents" - where that individual user's documents are stored by default.

    Moving it is as easy as right-clicking on the folder, choosing properties,
    selecting the "Target" tab, clicking on the "Move" button and choosing the
    new location.

    Where it is located has very little to do with FAT32 or NTFS unless you are
    concerned with file/folder permissions - in which case you need to be using
    NTFS to utilize those.

    What is "Explore"? Do you mean "Windows Explorer"? If so - what do you
    mean by "appear so often"?

    C:\Documents and Settings\USERNAME

    Put anything you want everyone to see in the "ALL USERS" start menu.
    Put anything you want for the individual users in their corresponding Start
    Menu/Desktop folders.

    Essentially, you may (if you want some users to have some things
    and others not have these things) have duplicate copies in
    different Start Menu/Desktop areas.

    HOW TO: Create and Configure User Accounts in Windows XP
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/279783

    HOW TO: Set, View, Change, or Remove Special Permissions for Files and
    Folders in Windows XP
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308419

    Doug's Windows XP Security Console
    http://www.dougknox.com/xp/utils/xp_securityconsole.htm

    Windows XP is a multi-user OS, even when used by one person only, the
    fundamentals don't change.

    Documents and Settings is the directory that contains your user
    information/documents/etc. It also contains a few extra directories used by
    Windows.

    One is "Default User" - This is used whenever a new account is created. It
    bases the initial setup of that account off this directory.

    Another is "All Users" - This is used by.. all users. If you want something
    to appear on the desktop of every user of the machine, you put it on this
    users desktop (in the desktop folder.) Etc.

    You may also see "Administrator" - depending on your setup, this is the
    original administrator user and if you know that account's password, you
    should leave him alone and use him only in an emergency.

    You could also (if you have it where you can see ALL files) see
    "LocalService" and "NetworkService" folders. These are service accounts,
    normally unused by the standard user.

    --
    Shenan Stanley
    MS-MVP
    --
    How To Ask Questions The Smart Way
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
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