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LGA1156 and water cooling

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January 17, 2010 10:30:29 AM

I have an H2o-220 Compact liquid cooler I used with an LGA775 CPU (Q6600). I just upgraded to a Maximus III Formula with an LGA1156 socket (will be using the I7-860). Yes, I OC'd the Q6600 and will be OC'ing the I7.
The pump/water block does not fit the new socket. My question, before I order a new water block (Apogee XT) and seperate pump, do I really require the resevoir as part of the circuit (since it is not a seperate unit with the H20-220 Compact)? Is there an advantage to using the seperate resevoir? Should the new pump include a speed controller or would a full (single) speed pump be sufficient?

More about : lga1156 water cooling

a b K Overclocking
January 17, 2010 3:37:01 PM

1. You can get LGA1156 bracket for the Swiftech GTZ. Contact Swiftech
http://www.swiftnets.com/products/apogee-gtz.asp
You can grab the Universal bracket for LGA775/1366/1156 for ~$5.
Part #: GTZ-UHD
The GTZ is still a good block and unless really pushing the OCing you won't notice much of a difference between the XT and the GTZ. (see point # 3 first)

2. No, the microres mounted on the MCP655 is good enough. (IIRC that kit came with a MCP655-B?)

3. The ONLY major upgrade I recommend that that you get a 320/360 rad. The change in the rad would have more affect than the change in the CPU block.
Not much sure on the LGA1156 i7 860 but the i7 920 NEEDS a 320/360 rad esp. when OCing.


For rad reviews: http://skinneelabs.com/triplesv2.html

edit: see my 2nd post on this thread.
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a c 86 K Overclocking
January 17, 2010 3:48:03 PM

Yep, you need a new pump. The only thing worth keeping is the MCR220 rad with the built in res cap. Shadow already mentioned the new CPU block.

Get a D-5 (DDC655)

Or a DDC3.2 (MCP 355), you'll need a pump top for the right sized barbs.

And the 220 rad should be enough for an i5. They aren't as hot as a i7.
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a b K Overclocking
January 17, 2010 4:32:05 PM

^ Conumdrum, doesn't that kit use the MCP655? What about heat output of the i7 860 (haven't looked much at LGA1156 tbh)?

edit: never mind, the Compact uses the Apogee Drive:
http://www.swiftnets.com/products/h20-220-compact.asp
Quote:
Complete CPU liquid kit for Intel® socket 775 compatible motherboard (all CPU models), and AMD® socket 754, 939, 940, AM2 , F (all CPU models) compatible motherboards, including Apogee Drive 350 self-powered water-block, dual MCR220 QP Res radiator with built-in reservoir, fans, "Radbox" external radiator housing, Smartcoiled Norprene 3/8" tubing, fittings, Hydrx coolant, installation guide.

I was thinking about the Swiftech 220 Ultima/Apex,etc which has the Swiftech GTZ.

So yeah, OP would need a new pump, block, rad, and tubing. Basically, completely new loop.

My recommendations:

Swiftech XT, HK 3.0, GTZ,etc depending on price/budget.
MCP 655 + Micro res
A good 320/360 rad with Yate Loon/Scythe fans
1/2" Tygon or Primoflex LRT tubing with needed barbs,etc.
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January 19, 2010 1:41:32 AM

I'm fairly new to WC'ing, so take this with a grain of salt...

Reservoirs are not required, but they do make filling and bleeding the system a LOT easier. I've reconfigured both my sealed systems and had to bleed them several times without reservoirs. My method of filling/bleeding: submerge one component of the system (I do a radiator) in a bath of coolant. with one line to that component disconnected but still in the bath, let the system run. Giggle/tip/turn each part to get all the air out. Once you're happy with the look/noise of the system, Connect that last hose while everything is under water. Pull it out and dry it off - you've now got a sealed, air free system. Pros of a sealed system: no evaporation or risk of contamination. Just make sure your bucket, component you're submerging and hands are very clean to keep the crud out of the system.

Also, I have found the MP355 pump to be a bit too much for my setup - i5-750@3.8, 2 single 120 radiators, CPU and GPU blocks. I wish I would have gotten the MP350 for less noise.
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a c 324 K Overclocking
January 20, 2010 7:00:59 PM

I think the 350 was the one that had the problem with stalling at system startup/PSU switch-on. ??? That was the reason they made improvements and released the 355.
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a b K Overclocking
January 20, 2010 10:20:16 PM

^ Yup. Imo, why get the 3xx's now? The MCP655's are good, and not much more $.
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January 22, 2010 1:08:44 AM

rubix_1011 said:
I think the 350 was the one that had the problem with stalling at system startup/PSU switch-on. ??? That was the reason they made improvements and released the 355.

Thanks for the correction - didn't know about that - some of the older research I've done led me to believe the 350 was just a lower power and quieter pump.

Shadow703793 said:
^ Yup. Imo, why get the 3xx's now? The MCP655's are good, and not much more $.

Size and layout constraints are the reason I went with the 3xx series over the 655.
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a b K Overclocking
January 23, 2010 9:07:36 PM

Quote:

Size and layout constraints are the reason I went with the 3xx series over the 655.

Ah.... what case btw?
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January 23, 2010 9:16:47 PM

Originally a CM 341 mATX case, now in a mini P180.
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January 24, 2010 1:03:28 AM

I thank you for the replies. They have been most helpful.
I ordered the Apex Ultima kit and the 320 radiator. They should be here on Monday.
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January 24, 2010 1:10:19 AM

Oh, if you are wondering what case I am using, it is the Antec 1200 w/ the side fan (blue LED) installed.
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January 30, 2010 11:34:53 PM

Best answer selected by jebuchanan.
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