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Media Player 11

Last response: in Windows XP
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March 15, 2011 12:35:50 AM

HI
Does any one know how to make the Windows Media Player 11 password protected..Other people use my PC
and I don't want them messing with my videos. There is a link on the internet saying how to activate media
player passwords but the options described are not on player 11.
Hope someone can point me in the right direction.
Regards

More about : media player

March 15, 2011 5:17:50 PM

Are you talking about something like this http://www.ehow.com/how_4700978_lock-windows-media-play...

That has nothing do with with the version of Media Player, you are just setting the user rights on the files. I don't see any way to setup Media Player to be locked with a password within the program.

If you found a link with instructions for another version, post it here so we can check.
March 15, 2011 5:36:36 PM

hi
The link that you posted is the one that I found. It claims that it does lock Media Player but I cant find the options expected.

I can't believe that microsoft would not have a privacy option for this type of program. It would be very easy to include and make it user selective.

Thanks for the reply
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March 15, 2011 6:16:50 PM

If you don't have a Security tab, you are probably using Simple File Sharing. Open up a folder, go to Tools, Folder Options, View tab. Scroll to the bottom and uncheck "Use simple file sharing". You can also just setup different accounts on the PC, they won't have rights to your personal files unless they are admin accounts.

Making Windows Media player locked by certain users won't keep your files safe, WMP only indexes and plays the files, the files themselves are just stored in your user folders (C:\Documents and Settings\username\My Documents). WMP does have privacy options, but you don't control access to it by the program, you do it with setting up user accounts and file permissions in Windows in general.

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/setup/winxp/ac...
March 15, 2011 6:26:05 PM

Thanks

I will have to take time to go over your explination.

I will get back on this

Many thanks
March 16, 2011 9:31:44 PM

Hi hang-the-9

I read your comments. But I think its my ignorance of WMP 11 that is the problem.

Using WMP 11, I can play a downloaded video clip..When its playing I can't find it in any of my folders, or even see an option to save the clip. There is no trace of it in my doc, or my video. When the clip has finished, or closing WMP there is no trace of it stored on my PC. The problem is that I don't know how to save clips. If I could, then I may be able to find the video folder, follow your advice, and cancel the simple file sharing.
My previous WMP had options for saving clips. I wish that I had never upgraded now. WMP11 is so different. There is a now playing and library button, but nothing saying save or offering a destination folder. I just can't find one.
March 17, 2011 2:27:40 PM

Ah, if you were playing streaming clips, it only streams the part to the computer that it needs and then clears out the temp files (otherwise you would end up with a full drive from watching YouTube, Netflix, etc...).

Where are you trying to save from? There are flash download programs file Real Player, etc... you can use to save internet video.

Many streaming online videos you won't be able to save due to rights.
March 17, 2011 2:48:31 PM

Someone else using your PC shouldn't even be able to see your files, let alone play them with Media Player. This assumes that you store your files under your profile (e.g. in "My Music") and that your disk is formatted as NTFS. Security settings make these files only visible to the user who created them. Not even an Administrator can access your private files by default.
March 17, 2011 2:51:29 PM

Ijack said:
Someone else using your PC shouldn't even be able to see your files, let alone play them with Media Player. This assumes that you store your files under your profile (e.g. in "My Music") and that your disk is formatted as NTFS. Security settings make these files only visible to the user who created them. Not even an Administrator can access your private files by default.


An Admin account can view any files on the PC unless the user specifically removes the account. I'm looking on my user files now, and Administrators group has full rights to them. Unless you are talking about a network admin account that does not have local admin rights.
March 17, 2011 3:06:20 PM

I'll take your word for it as I haven't got a XP system running to check. I was basing what I said on server systems where Home Directories are created with only the owner having rights to them. (Of course the Administrator can take ownership of the files, change their permissions, and then see them - that does tend to leave a pretty big footprint.)

But, if you're talking about Admins then all bets are off. There's no way to stop them accessing anything on the computer if they want to.

Edit: Yep. Just fired up an XP64 system and you're right (although my comment about if it's an Admin still applies). Interestingly, Windows 7 behaves more like the server software that I am used to; Administrators don't have access to users' files by default but can easily grant it to themselves - just as easily as they could undo any security changes made to the Media Player executable.
March 17, 2011 3:13:53 PM

Server rights are a bit different, but even then usually user directories have built-in Admin user rights, plus the user.
March 17, 2011 3:21:00 PM

(Also see the edit to my previous post.)

I'm 99.9% sure that you are wrong about Windows Server. I used to administer a Windows Server 2000 network of about 1,000 users and I know that the Administrator(s) couldn't access users' Home Directories by default, as long as you allowed the system to create those directories when adding a user. Default setting was access by owner only, even access to security settings, and the owner was the user. The only loophole was that an Administrator could take ownership of the directory and/or files, and then change the security settings. But then the Administrator couldn't change ownership back to the user so a canny user would know what had happened. I can't think that later versions of Server have more lax security settings.
March 17, 2011 3:29:08 PM

Just checked my network directory.

Local Administrator for the computer (admin account)
Me
Owner
System

Network Admins are not included but in almost all places Network Admins are part of the local administrators group on the PC, thus having access to user directories.
March 17, 2011 3:33:35 PM

But the network share isn't on the Local computer; it's on the Server. Surely that would be the relevant computer in the security settings? And the Local Administrator isn't the same as a member of the Local Administrators group, it's a specific account. If the server is a DC there is no Local Administrator unless you start up in Directory Restore mode.
March 17, 2011 3:43:34 PM

Ijack said:
But the network share isn't on the Local computer; it's on the Server. Surely that would be the relevant computer in the security settings? And the Local Administrator isn't the same as a member of the Local Administrators group, it's a specific account. If the server is a DC there is no Local Administrator unless you start up in Directory Restore mode.



That is true it's not on your own Local computer, but it IS on a Local computer which is the Server (meaning your user folder is on the drive attached to the server or configured using that server). Even the server has a local Administrators group (as it's basically a Windows Server OS PC).

I was talking about the Administrators group, not just the admin account, got lazy in typing my last post. I guess the point is that unless you specifically remove all users but yourself from rights, Windows by default will add several defaults that include the local Administrators group. And since pretty much you have some admin accounts in the local administrators group, you can gain access to any user file. This is way more true for a stand-alone PC that does not have security auditing checks.

March 17, 2011 3:47:35 PM

I can only say that your setup is not, as I recall, the default one. It's quite possible that a particular shop will decide to add admin into the permissions for obvious reasons. But I'm still sure it's not the default.

Whatever, it doesn't really matter. The point is that once you make your users Administrators there's little point in asking "how do I stop them doing so-and-so".
March 17, 2011 9:06:51 PM

TBH WMP11 is now my default player, after I foolishly selected the upgrade. If I click onto a "web clip" (you call it streaming) it comes up playing the clip. My earlier WMP version allowed me to save this Web clip into its library, and then create a playlist etc. I havn't figured out to save clips using WMP11 yet. The help says that any clip played gets auto put into the library, but I can't find them. I just want a simple player, not a bells and whistles version. Thats half the problem. As far as priviledges. I suppose that I am the administrator, as my PC is a single user and I don't use an account password.
As I am the only real user I can't be bothered, just occasionaly my grandson gets to use it and I want to keep him out of any files etc.
As far as administrators, any proper software hiearchy should only allow access to a limited depth, for account management etc, not to all user levels. Microsoft software is crap. They lost control and credibility when they allowed software liscencing and any tom dick or harry to get into the core system structure.

But back to my problem......What happens to web clips. how can I get WMP11 or any other compatable player to store downloaded streaming clips. And how can they be protected from casual viewing.

Regards
!