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Core I5 Voltages & Clock Rates

Last response: in Overclocking
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January 27, 2010 2:19:41 PM

Okay, so I'm fairly new to overclocking, my first overclocks being a Radeon HD 4870 (with custom cooler) and my old C2D E8400 to about 3.6GHz.

Well I just finished building my new I5 build, and I really don't know much about it - I just understand the basics. Well I put in my RAM, which is DDR3-1600, into my ASRock P55 Extreme, and it ran at 1333, so I decided to use "profile 1" to set my CPU to BCLK to 166, my QPI to 100, and my RAM to DDR3-1600 CAS 9-9-9-24.

Then I noticed that the voltage of my I5 was set to 1.3v, which I knew couldn't be correct with my 47c idle temp, so I put it back to 'Auto'. Now when I rebooted I get a 1.00v (as in 1.07 or so) voltage, which seems relatively low, and I was just wondering how low you can actually push the stock 2.67GHz on the I5.

(Temps as of right now are 40c Idle, 55-75c Load, intel stock HSF.)

The Build:

Core I5 2.67GHz @1.07v
8GB G.SKILL Ripjaws DDR3-1600 CAS 9-9-9-24 @ 1.5v
ASRock P55 Extreme Mobo
Radeon HD 5850 @ Stock
Corsair CMPSU-750TX PSU
NZXT M59
500GB WD HDD
Generic SATA DVD Burner
Windows 7 Home Premium

Best solution

a b K Overclocking
January 27, 2010 5:15:10 PM

Where to begin....

1. You probably already know that the i5 has an integrated memory controller, this memory controller will run the ram at a 2:10 ratio. This ratio is in effect with the base clock. The base clock is at 133 if your not overclocked.

2. Any thing above a 2:8 ratio is considered overclock, but 9/10 times it will work fine.

4. You raised the base clock to raise the ram speed which is fine. When you set the XMP profile it automatically set the vcore unnecessarily high because not all chips can boot at a lower vcore with such a high speed.

5. You are one of the lucky ones that can lower the voltage so low.

~hope the helps...
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a b K Overclocking
January 27, 2010 7:31:06 PM

overshocked said:
Where to begin....

1. You probably already know that the i5 has an integrated memory controller, this memory controller will run the ram at a 2:10 ratio. This ratio is in effect with the base clock. The base clock is at 133 if your not overclocked.
Since its a 2:10 ratio and a 133 base clock your memory frequency will be 1066.

10x133=1066

2. Any thing above a 2:8 ratio is considered overclock, but 9/10 times it will work fine.

3. You should have raise the memory ratio to 2:12 to get the full performance from your ram.

4. You decided to raise the base clock instead, which is fine, im just letting you know it could have been done other ways. When you set the XMP profile it automatically set the vcore unnecessarily high because not all chips can boot at a lower vcore with such a high speed.

5. You are one of the lucky ones that can lower the voltage so low.

~hope the helps...

i5 only supports up to 2:10. :( 
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a b K Overclocking
January 27, 2010 7:44:20 PM

andy5174 said:
i5 only supports up to 2:10. :( 


my bad, i was thinking of i7.
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January 28, 2010 2:24:13 PM

Thank you for the very useful info!

I was actually surprised that it ran stable in windows with such a low voltage, but I got a BSOD upon starting Crysis, so I raised it to 1.15v or so (not actually at the PC to check), and it runs perfectly stable with 2 hours of testing.

My new issue is that the memory absolutely refuses to run stable at the rated DDR3-1600. I currently have it at DDR3-1333 CAS 9-9-9-24. I understand this is because the P55 chipset has issues with 4 sticks of RAM, and I am just wondering if I can push it to DDR3-1600 stable without overvolting. (If not, the performance difference is minimal, and I'll live.)
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January 28, 2010 2:25:04 PM

Best answer selected by winglerw28.
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