Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

HDD for non-HardCore gaming?

Last response: in Storage
Share
March 17, 2010 3:04:55 PM

I'm looking for a HDD in 50-75$ price range.

At first I was aiming for SEAGATE 7200.12 500gb (because of it's single platter design), then I saw tons of people complaining that a portion of those drives turn out faulty, so you must run a bunch of tests and then RMA it and etc.

I would definitely get SAMSUNG Spinpoint f3 500gb, if I find one in Canada.
(all stores seem to be out of stock, if anyone knows when they'll be in stock please tell me)

Another option is WD Caviar Black or Blue. Some people praise WD, yet some say it's not as awesome as everybody claims.


Here are my options, please reccomend one of these:
1. Seagate 7200.12 500gb costs 54$ -- PRO: Fastest , CON: Risk of getting a faulty product
2. WD Caviar Black 640gb costs 74$ -- PRO: Fast , CON: Noisy (chance of pricematching to 65$)
3. WD Caviar Blue 640gb costs 62$ -- PRO: Not so fast , CON: tell me if you know

More about : hdd hardcore gaming

March 17, 2010 7:27:49 PM

bump
m
0
l

Best solution

a c 127 G Storage
March 17, 2010 7:34:40 PM

Does it all matter that much? Its not like HDDs differ all that much. Sure you have 5400rpm - 10.000rpm, different sizes, different platter capacity. But ultimately, every drive fails.

If you worry about drives failing, that implies that you are not using proper backups. Because if you do, you would care only about warranty period so your product gets refunded when it breaks. Your data will be safe either way.

Generally, i would get a single platter 500GB drive if you care about speed. Perhaps in a few years you would want an SSD to do the job for your system drive, though. And use HDDs only to store large (often unimportant) data.
Share
Related resources
March 17, 2010 8:34:52 PM

sub mesa said:
Does it all matter that much? Its not like HDDs differ all that much. Sure you have 5400rpm - 10.000rpm, different sizes, different platter capacity. But ultimately, every drive fails.

If you worry about drives failing, that implies that you are not using proper backups. Because if you do, you would care only about warranty period so your product gets refunded when it breaks. Your data will be safe either way.

Generally, i would get a single platter 500GB drive if you care about speed. Perhaps in a few years you would want an SSD to do the job for your system drive, though. And use HDDs only to store large (often unimportant) data.

I see your point. good reasoning!
m
0
l
March 24, 2010 10:14:48 PM

Best answer selected by aquicl.
m
0
l
!