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Will RAID 0 work in my situation?

Last response: in Storage
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March 22, 2010 1:24:20 PM

First off Hello. Alrighty so i have a WD HDD 300 gb installed right now. I took a seagates 250gb HDD out of my girlfriends old AT&T DVR box and was wondering if i would benefit from a RAID 0. I believe i have read that seeing as how my lowest HDD amount is 250 gb ill only be able to use 500gb altogether. Now my first HDD only has 60-70gb of free space left and i was wondering if i would have to remove some data or possibly wipe it...i really wouldnt want to have to remove all my torrented content and as of right now i dont have a 3rd HDD to transfer to. Im assuming what im dreading has to be done. Delete or transfer...someone please tell me im wrong :D 

Thanks for reading and any feedback would be great!

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a c 127 G Storage
March 22, 2010 2:16:24 PM

If you're setting up a RAID0 on two drives; data currently on the drive will be destroyed!

You may want to run two separate HDDs instead of running one RAID0. It sounds like you're using the HDD to boot from as well, meaning two HDDs might give you more performance than one RAID0, depending on your setup.

All in all, RAID0 is not worth it in your case.
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March 22, 2010 2:39:48 PM

sub mesa said:
If you're setting up a RAID0 on two drives; data currently on the drive will be destroyed!

You may want to run two separate HDDs instead of running one RAID0. It sounds like you're using the HDD to boot from as well, meaning two HDDs might give you more performance than one RAID0, depending on your setup.

All in all, RAID0 is not worth it in your case.


Well im running
win7 64bit
i5-750 3.6ghz
4gb ddr 1333 ram (dont remember oc number)
gtx 260 oc
and a 700w psu
with air cooling.

im not sure that this makes any difference for the RAID0 but i do have access to a third hdd to backup data if i needed to. and also if i ran the second HDD would i be able to load media from the HDD without any longer latency as if it was the main drive?
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a c 127 G Storage
March 22, 2010 2:42:55 PM

It helps your performance if you use two drives; one as system drive storing windows and installed applications, one for personal usage, depending on how you use your computer.

For example, someone using photoshop will prefer using multiple drives, where the scratch disk is separate from the windows disk. This has the advantage of separating usage patterns; your system drive will only issue windows-related I/O request, so you other HDD doesn't get hampered by windows; its dedicated to what you will be using the drive for. So essentially you're separating your I/O access between several devices; so each device only has to process a piece of the total load. This may work very well in a number of cases.
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March 22, 2010 2:54:52 PM

sub mesa said:
It helps your performance if you use two drives; one as system drive storing windows and installed applications, one for personal usage, depending on how you use your computer.

For example, someone using photoshop will prefer using multiple drives, where the scratch disk is separate from the windows disk. This has the advantage of separating usage patterns; your system drive will only issue windows-related I/O request, so you other HDD doesn't get hampered by windows; its dedicated to what you will be using the drive for. So essentially you're separating your I/O access between several devices; so each device only has to process a piece of the total load. This may work very well in a number of cases.


now seeing as how i have a tiny bit over 60gb left on my 300gb HDD (main drive) if i put the 250gb hdd in would it be better to throw as much on that drive as possible and then just fill up my main drive like normal? I understand what your saying with having specific drives for specific purposes but that would probably make more sense if i was using a tiny SSD and a 1TB or something like that...if you havent notice my HDD knowledge is kind of limited lol so with this bit of info ill leave it up to you smart people to help me out lol

WD main drive:
Total-300gb
Free space:60-70gb

Seagates:
Total:250
Free:250
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a c 127 G Storage
March 22, 2010 7:07:16 PM

My recommended setup:

C: Windows (size: 20GB - 40GB max on drive1)
D: backups and other passive data (remaining capacity on drive1)

E: active data set (max size).

In this example, the system drive is partitioned with a small C: drive to store Windows and installed apps, and D: which are backups and other data that is only rarely accessed. The E-partition would be on a different physical harddrive; drive2.

The advantage here is that you have isolated windows system disk to one HDD, that HDD is not used for anything else than windows and backups. Also, by creating a small partition for the C-drive you force that data to be on the fastest portion of the harddrive. While with a large partition and few free space, it would fragment alot all over the disk causing a lot of seeking and thus low performance.

So by creating a small C-partition at the beginning of the drive and limiting it in size, will help your performance.

The second HDD does most of the work and accessed your active data set (all your personal data - everything except installed windows/applications).
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March 22, 2010 7:11:22 PM

Best answer selected by white4lfe.
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