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EVGA Working on 120 amp Prototype Power Supplies

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January 10, 2009 7:37:02 AM

EVGA working on 120 amp prototype power supplies



1200w modular and non-modular


by AuDioFreaK39

During CES, we have spoken to several EVGA representatives regarding the company's recent marketing plans and ideas. In our discussion, the company revealed two prototype PSUs that it has been considering for the retail market.

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January 10, 2009 7:44:46 AM

you're going to need a dedicated circuit to run that monster without tripping the breaker. monitor and speakers would put it over the limit if your wiring isn't tip top.
a b ) Power supply
January 10, 2009 11:04:37 AM

not at 12volts, at 12 volts 120amps is only 1.4Kw, which equates back to 6.5amps at the wall.
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January 10, 2009 2:51:01 PM

Don't forget to add 25% for lack of efficiency and if its running on 100v line then the load is going to be upwards of 16-20A from the socket which will push many sockets over their limit.

Here in the UK it will work from a socket but thats still alot of power for a computer to be using.
January 10, 2009 3:21:11 PM

13thmonkey said:
not at 12volts, at 12 volts 120amps is only 1.4Kw, which equates back to 6.5amps at the wall.


The dual +12v rails are supposed to run with 60a each, or 720w available.

The OEM is rumored to be Silverstone, although this hasn't been confirmed with EVGA yet.
January 10, 2009 6:16:48 PM

Is 100 volt lines new? I thought everything was rated at 110, with 120 possible? Also, Im hoping its higher than 75%, maybe over 80%
January 10, 2009 6:52:10 PM

100 volts may be a bit low, but its only a very minor brownout.

published efficiencies are also optimistic, like the gross HP ratings of 60's muscle cars and current electric motor power ratings.

efficiency drops off if the supply voltage is low, and when you are near the limits.

so 75% efficiency and 100 volts is going to be seen from time to time, unless the power grid is phenominal in your neiborhood

Are you going to want to check the wall voltage every time you want to play Crysis?

whe the weather is ****, or when its too hot to go outside are the best time to waste in front of a computer.

I'd want a dedicated 20 amp circut (thicker gauge wiring too, not just swaping out to a bigger breaker) for my computer if I "needed" a 1200 watt PSU.
January 10, 2009 7:01:16 PM

So, 12 gauge 20 amp? I guess for the best optimal scenarios. I wouldnt think youd need dedicated, but go light on that circuit maybe
January 10, 2009 7:47:38 PM

12 gauge/20 amp is a minor investment if your computer needs the kind of power this PSU pumps out.

more so for some one like you; living in the land of brownouts (California).

its easy to do if you have an unfinished basement. I ran 2 heavy lines when I redid my kitchen 1 for the fridge, 1 for the dishwasher and disposal.

I don't envision ever building a computer than needs more than a 750watt PSU myself.
January 11, 2009 2:42:21 AM

Well, they do have brownouts here, but not too many basements. Earthquakes ya know heheh. Yeah, 750 watter seems enough, funny thing is, people whod need a 1400 watter, theyd end up hiring someone else to do it, more than likely
January 11, 2009 3:39:15 PM

I wouldn't say 120A @ 12V would trip a healthy 15A breaker that often. Silverstone's efficiency at full load with high capacity PSUs seems around 82%, so 1440W leads to a 1756W AC draw, or 14.6A @ 120V. This is a power factor corrected PSU, so you don't have to bump wattage by 15-20% for volt-amps. During a brownout, efficiency does drop a few % down to 90V, but the circuit breaker would also need a higher amperage to trip. 90V is the lowest voltage most high-end PSUs are specified down to.

The main thing is that it's hard to perfectly load a 1200W PSU. Many people buy PSUs of a higher capacity for the individual rails, for more stable power, and in consideration of PSU aging (which has a measurable impact on capacity, not efficiency). A 1200W PSU certainly won't draw 1756W AC continuous running a tri-SLI i7 gaming system.

And if your circuit does trip - if the breaker is corroded after many years - any electrician can replace the 15A with a 20A at the offending juncture.
January 11, 2009 4:00:20 PM

breakers trip low very often, and I've seen a PSU test efficiency writeup that showed acual efficienciesdropping off very significantly toward 90 volts. If I remember, the 80plus they were looking at was closer to 70%.

I tripped a breaker with my old computer (350 watt psu), boombox, and aquarium. probably not much over 1000 watts. you may say it wasn't healthy, I say very few circuts are up to what they should be. that's why I say go a little overboard on the wall power if you go that much overboard on the PSU.

some people may actualy need that much 12volt draw if they've got TECs and/or waterpumps in the mix with all the fans and graphics cards.

I was also refering to the whole computer setup, not just the box. You need to remember to add in the monitor(s), powered speakers, wireless router, cable modem,light(s), printer(s)

There is a lot more than just some mathmatical equations under ideal conditions involved in all this.
January 12, 2009 12:06:38 AM

Hmmm...120V * 15A = 1800Watts or 1800VA. 12V * 120A = 1,440 Watts. 1440 * 1.25(for inefficiency based on 80% PSU) =

1800Watts at Full load. If you plan to have a system to consume this very large amount of power continuously, you would

need a new circuit designed for higher power draw. I don't think anyone would run this at 100% so let's pretend you use 80%

of its power. We have 1152W * 1.25(for inefficiency based on 80% PSU) = 1440W of power draw or 12A. 12A is below the

maximum of 15A but is still getting close, especially if you add other units to draw power off of the same circuit. Power Factor

correction brings the Capacitive Reactance and the Inductive Reactance closer to 0%. This doesn't compensate for the

inefficiency. Saying that you don't have to add the inefficiency to the power draw is assuming the PSU is 100% efficient. You

cannot replace a 15A breaker with a 20A breaker EVER! a 14 Gauge conductor can handle 15A, sure it may be able to handle

more in ideal conditions, but according to the National Electric Code it states 15A. A 12 gauge Conductor can handle 20A

according to the NEC as well. Changing a 15A breaker for a 20A is completely dangerous and can cause a fire that may

endanger anyone living inside. YOU CANNOT REPLACE A LOWER AMPERAGE BREAKER WITH ONE WITH A HIGHER AMPERAGE

RATING! EVER! Any electrical work should be done by a qualified and trained Electrician. I've seen some pretty nasty amateur

wiring jobs. If you ever consider upgrading your circuit you need to make sure all the components are of the same electrical

ratings.
January 12, 2009 12:51:58 AM

JAYDEEJOHN said:
Is 100 volt lines new? I thought everything was rated at 110, with 120 possible? Also, Im hoping its higher than 75%, maybe over 80%


Every 120V receptacle or outlet I have checked is 120V +/- 5%. It seems 110V is old because I hear lots of older people saying it's 110V, where my voltmeter says it is 120V. Your house or Apt, whichever it may be is 2 phase 120V/240V
January 12, 2009 12:57:45 AM

groo said:
100 volts may be a bit low, but its only a very minor brownout.

published efficiencies are also optimistic, like the gross HP ratings of 60's muscle cars and current electric motor power ratings.

efficiency drops off if the supply voltage is low, and when you are near the limits.

so 75% efficiency and 100 volts is going to be seen from time to time, unless the power grid is phenominal in your neiborhood

Are you going to want to check the wall voltage every time you want to play Crysis?

whe the weather is ****, or when its too hot to go outside are the best time to waste in front of a computer.

I'd want a dedicated 20 amp circut (thicker gauge wiring too, not just swaping out to a bigger breaker) for my computer if I "needed" a 1200 watt PSU.



Hey, I cannot stress enough that you simply cannot just swap out breakers of different Amperage. The Breaker that you are replacing it with has to be the same size or smaller. Electrons create heat which in turn can cause fires when smaller conductors get too hot due to the extra current flow. You are correct that 12GA conductors are rated for 20A. 14Ga for 15A, 10GA for 30A(Wires made of Copper not of Aluminum) Aluminum is not that great of a conductor, so it cannot handle the same loads that a similar sized copper conductor can.
January 12, 2009 1:24:38 AM

is nvidia's next gen cards so power hungry that they need 1200 watts and 120 amps just to run. lol
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