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Replacing the thermal compound on my gigabyte northbridge

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February 7, 2010 12:53:28 AM

Hello all,
I just selected the best answer in another thread, so Im gonna post this here,
I hope thats the right way to go about, please let me know otherwise.

With both arctic silver 5 and arctic silver ceramique in hand, because Im not sure which to use, I am ready to attempt the removal, cleaning, reapplicatin of thermal compound, and reinstallation of my north bridge heatsink on my GA-MA770T-UD3P motherboard.
Is there anyone that has had to do this or is familier with the process?
The heatsink is held down by 2 plastic posts with springs and look like I will have to release them from the underside of the mobo. Is this correct?
The heatsink is loose on the northbridge and I wish to make it right.
Thanx to anyone in advance.
Jeff

Okay, did the deed last night.
Removed the heatsink, cleaned the mating surfaces, added just a drop of as5, reassembled everything.
Restarted the puter.
ran prime for 40 minutes. (it was late and I was getting tired.
Here are the results.


And this morning after starting up the box and adding Everest.

I cannot make sense of the different temperature sensors.
The CPU at 78c in everest must be wrong as my system is stable, no issues.
Ive looked all over the place and did google searches cannot find conclusive answers as to what each testpoint represents.
I could really use the help if anyone would kindly offer some feedback and guidance

a b K Overclocking
February 7, 2010 4:47:07 PM

I have purchased motherboards that came with loose northbridge and southbridge heatsinks. I removed the heatsinks; cleaned the chipsets and heatsinks; applied new thermal compund; and reinstalled the heatsinks using #40-4 nylon nuts, bolts, and washers. They do a much better job of securing the heatsinks than the typical push pins.

The push pins are relased from the bottom of the motherboard. Look for two tiny flanges that spread and catch the backside of the motherboard. Carefully squeeze them together to compress them so that they will move through the mounting holes.

The #40-4 nylon nuts, bolts, and washers do a much better job of securing the heatsinks. Gently hand tighten only. It doesn't take much to hold the heatsinks in place. I purchase the nylont nuts, bolts, and washers at my local Ace Hardware store for 8 cents each. I learned that trick over at the Asus motherboard forum.

Use the Arctic Silver Ceramique for the chipsets.
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February 7, 2010 5:01:40 PM

Thanx for the reply Johnny,
Should I redo it using the ceramique instead?
I used the as5 last night.
That dang northbrdge chip is SMALL!!!!!!!
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a b K Overclocking
February 7, 2010 5:08:48 PM

GEE! You must have posted the screen shots while I was busy answering your original questions.

You used Artic Silver 5. The compound requires 200 hours of operation and numerous turning on and off cycles before the compound cures and stabilizes. Temperature readings will appear strange until then.

The consensus is that different utilities and applications used to monitor temperature produce different results. Currently the two favorite utilities seem to be coretemp and hwmonitorpro.

In the meantime, the next time you start your computer go into BIOS. Find the temperature readings and post the results.
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February 7, 2010 5:13:05 PM

Thanx man,
I'll do that now, then restart and compare.
then repost here
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a b K Overclocking
February 7, 2010 5:21:15 PM

hehehehe happened again.

If you don't mind taking things apart again, then I would recommend switching to the ceramic compound.

Yes, the chipset is tiny compared to the heatsink. The first one I did was on an AMD motherboard. Great big heatsink with a great big thermal compound pad and a tiny little chipset. I used a toothpick to apply a tiny amount of compound.
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February 7, 2010 5:21:29 PM

according to the bios

system 30c
CPU 41c
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February 7, 2010 5:24:31 PM

JohnnyLucky said:
hehehehe happened again.

If you don't mind taking things apart again, then I would recommend switching to the ceramic compound.

Yes, the chipset is tiny compared to the heatsink. The first one I did was on an AMD motherboard. Great big heatsink with a great big thermal compound pad and a tiny little chipset. I used a toothpick to apply a tiny amount of compound.

I can do that while im watching the super bowl later today.
Im thinking I should put a tiny drop on then spread it with a toothpick, is that the way to do it?
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a b K Overclocking
February 7, 2010 5:33:17 PM

OK! That's fine for now. I'm assuming you used AS5 for your cpu and that you did it recently so it has not had a chance to cure. Is that correct? If yes, then the cpu temp will drop once the compound has cured. If your case has excellent ventilation, airflow, and cooling the results should be quite good.

Are you using a stock AMD heatsink or did you replace it?


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a b K Overclocking
February 7, 2010 5:36:57 PM

The chipset was so tiny I used a toothpick just to get the little dab of compound on the chipset. I let the pressure from the heatsink spread it out.

I have to get ready for a Super Bowl party. May not be back online until tomorrow morning.
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February 7, 2010 5:38:02 PM

thanx for the help, johnny.
enjoy the game, as will I
Stock amd cooler,
Completed the build last wednesday.
I used the thermal compound that came on the amd hsf
Think I should redo the compound on the cpu while im at it.
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Best solution

a b K Overclocking
February 7, 2010 5:44:55 PM

Yes. Would not hurt to switch to ceramic compound for the cpu.

Before I forget again - The temps that you see in the utilities are usually for a sensor on the motherboard, a sensor in the cpu, and/or sensors in each cpu core. Each one usually shows three temps - the current temp, the lowest temp measured during monitoring, and the highest temp measured during monitoring. The current favorite is the cpu core temperature. The utilities do not include temperature readings for the northbridge or southbridge chipsets.
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February 7, 2010 6:10:46 PM

Thanx man,
dont know if youre stll online but what does the 78c represent?
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February 14, 2010 5:21:08 AM

Best answer selected by jhandley.
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a b K Overclocking
February 14, 2010 7:08:41 AM

78 degrees Celsius
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February 14, 2010 3:03:03 PM

LOL
I figure as it doesnt change at all it is a bad sensor, but otherwise, thanx man!
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!