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Can Prolimatech Megahalems cool a 100 degrees cpu?

can Prolimatech Megahalems cool a 100deg celsius cpu?

actually i have a powermac g5 dual 2.7 GHz which operates at 87 deg celsius and i'm planning to replace the water cooling unit from it since it leaked and corrode some parts like processor, mainboard and psu. i have googled a lot of cooling units and i found out that PM fits on its mounting and dimensions. since its dual, one processor is at 74 deg C and the other one is 87 deg C which is as far as i know its too hot! because the cooling system design of tubes and flow of the water are not parallel to the proc besides the water from the radiator flow going to proc 1 then passes thru proc 2. i think proc 2 had all the burdens. i'd like to place 2 Prolimatech Megahalems on it. what do u think guys?
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More about prolimatech megahalems cool degrees
  1. A 100 degree celsius CPU is a dead or soon to be dead CPU.

    I'm typing from a box that has a Prolimatech on a 920 and it's temps are :

    CPU - 46 / Cores = 58, 54, 55, 54 at 3.7 Ghz under prime95
    CPU - 50 / Cores = 70, 67, 66, 65 at 4.3 Ghz under OCCT

    CPU temp from HWMonitor / Core Temps from Realtemp
  2. Lol, your cpu will be dead soon if it is 100c.

    The megahalem can cool any cpu out there right now very well. In fact it is the number 2 best heatsink according to frosttech.com.
  3. Which Intel cpu are you asking about?
  4. There really is no such thing as a 100c CPU, temperature is a measure of just that temperature, not a measure of heat.

    And LOL Johnny I love how you just outright say, that it's an Intel.
  5. i think he means 100F, he would not be typing if his CPU hit 100c....
  6. tkgclimb - Possible misunderstanding?

    I interpreted the question to be can a cpu heatsink cool a cpu operating at a temperature of 100 degrees Celsius.

    It is actually possible with a few very old cpu's such as the Intel Pentium M, AMD Athalon Thunderbird, and AMD Athalon MP. It is ancient history. That's why I asked the OP which cpu.
  7. I dont think so ovrclkr a few times ive gone up to 105 on a 920. (;

    its not fun, but it happend.
  8. Ovrclkr, probably right, but still he typed out "celsius"

    @Johnny my point still holds true, you could have a dual core and a more powerful quad core at 100 (on different coolers of course)
    and it would take a more of an improvement in cooling to cool the quad core down. Just because the quad puts out more heat. To fully answer the question the cpu, or even better the heat-out put is needed. (well actually a megalhem will probably cool it to as cool as needed)

    Overshocked remember your doing extreme oc'ing the OP is probably not.
  9. Haha, i would never overclock if it would take me to 105, ive just made some mistakes like not turning on the compressor of my phase change before i turned on my pc. Or just flat out f'ing up the mounting job to the point where the hsf or pot isnt even touching the cpu. This happens alot when there is a bunch of insulation in the way.
  10. Well in any case, your doing some pretty extreme stuff.

    Hey shouldn't the PC shut it self down at those temps (if they are in C). I know I've left my CPU fan unplugged once and the temps go so hot the PC shutdown (I P95ing after a new application of TIM), gave me a blue screen, and when I felt the HSF it was scalding.
  11. tkgclimb - We missed each other's points. There actually were a couple of cpu's like the Pentium M that had much higher maximum operating temperatures than we are currently used to. The Pentium M only dissipated 25 watts. A few specially designed cpu's were installed in spacecraft that were sent on exploratory missions.
  12. I was using hw monitor, so it must have either been giving the wrong temps, or the cpu was scaling down really extremely.

    Technically i think its supposed to shut off at 100c, but mebe thats cpu temp. I was giving you core temp.
  13. JohnnyLucky said:
    tkgclimb - We missed each other's points. There actually were a couple of cpu's like the Pentium M that had much higher maximum operating temperatures than we are currently used to. The Pentium M only dissipated 25 watts. A few specially designed cpu's were installed in spacecraft that were sent on exploratory missions.


    Sorry, I gotcha now

    Overshocked,

    I gotcha also
  14. Some of the old P4s can run at 100C without crashing, though they will begin to throttle and won't have a very long life :D.
  15. 100 tdp?

    he could mean a 100tdp cpu or something he saw in a box and through, it runs at 100c!
  16. actually i have a powermac g5 dual 2.7 GHz which operates at 87 deg celsius and i'm planning to replace the water cooling unit from it since it leaked and corrode some parts like processor, mainboard and psu. i have googled a lot of cooling units and i found out that PM fits on its mounting and dimensions. since its dual, one processor is at 74 deg C and the other one is 87 deg C which is as far as i know its too hot! because the cooling system design of tubes and flow of the water are not parallel to the proc besides the water from the radiator flow going to proc 1 then passes thru proc 2. i think proc 2 had all the burdens. i'd like to place 2 Prolimatech Megahalems on it. what do u think guys?
  17. Best answer
    O.o well it never hurts to try,

    although a liquid cooled mac? Is it custom? i mean they got them powerpc chips inside and not any x86 thing, and yet it fits PM?!

    who knows, maybe the heat characteristic of the setup is different and the liquid is as good as you can get (you did top it off and add new water and change it out and etc rite? and make sure the things aren't corroded inside etc. etc.)


    the PM IS better than the cheapo water cooling setup, but if you got a high end setup with multiple reservoirs and large cooling fans and good pump that cycles the water quick and nice water blocks on the cpus, PMs will not be able to beat that.
  18. thanks for the tip theholylance.........

    it has the powerpc 970 procies and it is in factory default but i noticed about the coolant. maybe apple is adding water on it. just coolant alone. maybe i should try water wetter first and distilled water because it work great for my car and i think it also work great for my g5.

    but i think apple's cooling system is great. maybe i should try your suggestion.

    thanks
  19. Best answer selected by 09rodney17.
  20. well yeah try cleaning it first, since it is after all a WC system and I can't think apple screwed up that much in terms of parts, but they can with the liquid if they wanted to make some more cash in service calls.

    well check with what is in there first, make sure it is non corrosive, I have seen noobie (and even manufacturer like apple) that used corrosive liquids and it caused issues in the long run (2-5 yr + )where the cooler is getting rusty and the cooling capability goes dramatically lower without a service call

    you can drain the system, and take apart the water block and check for rust inside if you think you know what to do, and since it appears you know some working of car cooling with these, maybe you can give it a try...

    or you can give it to apple and let them take a look, but be prepared to spend a pretty penny

    and read this:

    http://www.overclockers.com/watercooling-and-electrochemistry/

    maybe it will help you understand the underlying issue with using corrosive water coolant, which is cheaper and it guarantees that customers will be making service calls a few years down the road and you can fix it relatively cheaply and charge for a lot of money
  21. thanks holylance. you're a great help!
  22. NP hope it works out for ya, I studied up on all the WC stuff and even played with one in a friends place, but in the end air had to do since I move lots....

    Glad all that reading on anti-corrosion and fittings and what is a good water block is doing something...
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